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Ring o project[1]
Ring o project[1]
Ring o project[1]
Ring o project[1]
Ring o project[1]
Ring o project[1]
Ring o project[1]
Ring o project[1]
Ring o project[1]
Ring o project[1]
Ring o project[1]
Ring o project[1]
Ring o project[1]
Ring o project[1]
Ring o project[1]
Ring o project[1]
Ring o project[1]
Ring o project[1]
Ring o project[1]
Ring o project[1]
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Ring o project[1]

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  • 1. A collection of activities based off books with science/math and language art standards connected to Gardner ’ s multiple intelligences. Ring O Project Education 356
  • 2. Leo The Late Bloomer <ul><li>Review from Amazon.com </li></ul><ul><li>Leo isn’t reading, or writing, or drawing, or even speaking, and his father is concerned. But Leo’s mother isn’t. She knows her son will do all those things, and more, when he’s ready. ‘Reassuring for other late bloomers, this book is illustrated with beguiling pictures. </li></ul>
  • 3. Leo The Late Bloomer <ul><li>Read the book aloud, and use it to lead into a discussion. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Talk about how we all grow and bloom differently. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Talk about how we all have different features such as size, shape, hair, skin and eye color. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Have students complete the “Here’s Looking at You” activity from the Indiana Academic Resources. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.indianastandardsresources.org/files/sci/sci_2_4_6.pdf </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Students must work together and socialize with their classmates in order to complete this activity. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>It also a good way for students to learn about their classmates. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Students will tally up how many students have certain physical features. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>At the end of the lesson have students add up the tally's in each section. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Have students look at their data and write two about findings they found from their data. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Standards </li></ul><ul><li>Science 2.4.6- Observe and describe the different external features of people, such as their size, shape, and color of hair, skin, and eyes. </li></ul><ul><li>Mathematics 2.1.12 - Represent, compare, and interpret data using tables, tally charts, and bar graphs. </li></ul><ul><li>Garner </li></ul><ul><li>Mathematical/Logical – (Working with numbers) </li></ul><ul><li>Interpersonal – ( Be with other and socialize) </li></ul>
  • 4. I Saw an Ant on the Railroad Track <ul><li>Review from Amazon.com </li></ul><ul><li>&quot;Well, I saw an ant on the railroad track. The rail was bright. The ant was black. He was walking along, tickety-tack.&quot; Speaking this sprightly rhyme is Switchman Jack, whose job it is to make sure that trains don't collide. But when he spots a tiny ant on the track, it is his job is to make sure &quot;an eastbound ant&quot; doesn't run into a &quot;westbound train.&quot; There are also a few breath-holding moments as the ant keeps up his steady march toward the train. Then the switch gets stuck! But the ant is smarter than it looks and veers off the track--all the better to share lunch with Jack. Prince's text is rhythmically perfect, and it will be lots of fun to read aloud. Pamintuan's computer-enhanced artwork makes use of all sorts of interesting perspectives, some from the tiny ant's view, and some from tall Jack's. </li></ul>
  • 5. I Saw an Ant on the Railroad Track <ul><li>Activity </li></ul><ul><li>Read the book aloud to the class </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Explain to students that ants also have body parts like humans and each part serves a purpose. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Explain to the students the different body parts of an ant. The ant had three main body parts the head, thorax, and abdomen. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Show students this website about Ants from Zooomschool.com </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.zoomschool.com/subjects/insects/ant/ </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Start a discussion about ants and let the students tell any interesting stories or adventures they have with ants. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Then setup station with microscopes and magnify glass. Have the students examine the ants with the microscopes and magnify glass. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Tell the students too look for the body parts discussed earlier and any other parts that they can notice </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Finally have the students return to their seats and write about what they saw. Have them use descriptive words to describe each part of the ants body the head, thorax, and abdomen. Then write about any other interesting things they noticed on the ant. ( Putting a list of descriptive words up on the board might help them get started) </li></ul><ul><li>Standards </li></ul><ul><li>Science 2.1.2- Use tools, such as thermometers, magnifiers, rulers, or balances, to gain more information about objects. </li></ul><ul><li>Language Arts 2.5.5 - Use descriptive words when writing. </li></ul><ul><li>Gardner </li></ul><ul><li>Naturalistic </li></ul><ul><li>Verbal Linguistic </li></ul>
  • 6. Rattletrap Car <ul><li>Review from Amazon. Com </li></ul><ul><li>Junie and Jakie suggested a trip to the lake. Poppa worries about whether or not their old car will make it (&quot;It doesn't go fast and it doesn't go far&quot;), but the family decides to give it a try. They haven't gone far when &quot;boomsssssssss. The tire went flat.&quot; Junie knows what to do-she puts her beach ball in the place of the wheel, sticking it on tight with chocolate marshmallow fudge delight. Then, &quot;whumpety whomp!&quot;-the floor falls off. This time, Jakie knows just what to do. A series of other near-disasters follows, each finding a silly remedy with an item that had been packed for the outing, and they make it to the lake. Cumulative stories are most successful when they have a little twist or surprise at the end, and there isn't one here, but the bouncy, creative language more than makes up for that lack. The internal rhymes, alliteration, and creative car sounds make a perfect read-aloud. The watercolor illustrations are full of action as the rattletrap car bounces off the road and seems to rush off the page. The words for the car sounds bounce, too, in their larger, uneven fonts. The illustrations contribute humorous detail capturing the family's alternating despair, inventiveness, and glee at moving again. </li></ul>
  • 7. Rattletrap Car <ul><li>Activity </li></ul><ul><li>Read the book Rattletrap Car, after the story talk about the different parts of the car that broke down in the story. </li></ul><ul><li>Explain to the students that cars are made of many different parts, and so are a lot of other things </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Ask the students to think of other things that are made of parts. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Make a list of the items the students come up with, and talk about how these objects are made of parts. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>After the discussion, have students the students create a different ending to the Rattletrap Car story. The students could have more car parts fall off or they can have the family go to a different destination. </li></ul><ul><li>Standards </li></ul><ul><li>Science 2.6.1- Investigate that most objects are made of parts. </li></ul><ul><li>Language Arts 2.3.2 - Create different endings to stories and identify the problem and the impact of the different ending. </li></ul><ul><li>Garner </li></ul><ul><li>Verbal Linguistic – writing a different ending </li></ul>
  • 8. Stuff!: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle <ul><li>Review from Amazon.com </li></ul><ul><li>This cheerful community story illustrates all three parts of the environmentalists’ mantra named in the subtitle. Pinch is a pack rat, in both behavior and species. His house is a temple to hoarding: objects spill from his windows, doors, gutters, and chimneys—even onto the street. When his neighbors invite him to join their tag sale, he declines: “I like all my stuff!” But after he realizes that there is money to be made at the sale, he wheels cartloads of junk to the town square, sells almost everything, and finds that he enjoys seeing others value his overlooked objects. A closing twist brings in Pinch’s pack rat relatives for a community greening effort. Veteran author Kroll’s well-paced text folds the recycling and reuse concepts into an enjoyable story that’s greatly expanded in Cox’s mixed-media, digital illustrations. </li></ul>
  • 9. Stuff: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle <ul><li>Activity </li></ul><ul><li>Read aloud the story Stuff: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle </li></ul><ul><ul><li>At the end of the story ask the students to try and identify the moral or lesson of the story. Give them clues from story to help guide them towards the right answer. The morale of the story is one man’s trash is another man’s treasure. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Discuss what that morale means and how it relates to reduce, reuse, and recycling. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ask the students what they think reduce, reuse, recycle means? Then explain what each part means and that it is called the Three R’s </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Listen to the song from Jack Johnson called 3 R’s. This is a great song and the students will enjoy it. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dKdZYYmTT9A </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Finally have the students spilt up into groups and brainstorm about items that are thrown away at their house that can be reused again. Have the students make a list of the items, and how they could reuse them. Each group will share their list and ideas with the classroom at the end. </li></ul><ul><li>Standards </li></ul><ul><li>Science 2.1.7- Recognize and describe ways that some materials, such as recycled paper, cans, and plastic jugs, can be used again. </li></ul><ul><li>Language Arts 2.3.7 - Identify the meaning or lesson of a story. </li></ul><ul><li>Gardner </li></ul><ul><li>Musical </li></ul><ul><li>Interpersonal </li></ul>
  • 10. Stuff: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle ( 2 nd Activity) <ul><li>Second Activity </li></ul><ul><li>Build A Bird Feeder from the Indiana Academic Resources </li></ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.indianastandardsresources.org/files/sci/sci_2_1_6.pdf </li></ul></ul><ul><li>In this activity students will design and build their own bird feeder. The students will be given a handout where they have to give measurements on how long their string will be to hang their feeder. How tall their feeder will be, and how many cups of birdseed will fit into their feeder. Each measurement should be rounded off to the nearest inch, foot, or cup. After the student have completed their design they must have the teacher approve their measurements before they start building their feeder. ( Make sure the birdseed measurement is a reasonable number) Once the teacher has approved their plans, give the student their milk carton and let them begin. If you want you can setup stations for the students to measure out their string and birdseed. </li></ul><ul><li>Before you start the lesson talk about how we are reusing the milk jugs, instead of throwing them away. </li></ul><ul><li>Standards </li></ul><ul><li>Science 2.1.6 - Use tools to investigate, observe, measure, design, and build things </li></ul><ul><li>Science 2.1.7- Recognize and describe ways that some materials, such as recycled paper, cans, and plastic jugs, can be used again. </li></ul><ul><li>Math 2.5.1 - Measure and estimate the length to the nearest inch, foot, yard, centimeter, and meter. </li></ul><ul><li>Math 2.5.5 - Estimate and measure capacity using cups and pints. </li></ul><ul><li>Gardner </li></ul><ul><li>Mathematical (estimation of measurments) </li></ul><ul><li>Bodily Kinaesthetic (hands on activity) </li></ul>
  • 11. Those Darn Squirrels! <ul><li>Review from Amazon.com </li></ul><ul><li>This simple tale has a sneaky, edgy humor that erupts into hilarity as well as a warm, stabilizing feeling for humanity in all of its quirky manifestations. &quot;Old Man Fookwire was so old that when he sneezed, dust came out. He was also a grump. He hated pie. He hated puppies. The only thing he liked was birds.&quot; This verbal introduction to the main character is enhanced with paintings—reminiscent of some of the best European children's book illustrations—of an exaggeratedly skinny, flannel-shirted caricature with a long neck, long nose, oversized glasses, and protruding Adam's apple. He never smiles, even when he's painting pictures of the birds that visit his yard every summer. In an attempt to keep the birds around when autumn arrives, he builds wonderful birdfeeders. They do indeed attract the birds—but they also catch the eye of the squirrels. The cheerful, brilliant, and adorable creatures are shown using pulleys, weights, and remarkable cooperative planning to foil Fookwire and raid the feeders. The old man fights back. But the squirrels, still smiling and hopeful, stay up all night for a planning meeting and devise a daring escapade that relies heavily on their deep understanding of physics and their willingness to be launched through the air. What happens to the squirrels, the birds, and to Old Man Fookwire is a symphony of regret, respect, and sweetness. Readers will want to linger over this book and treasure every page. </li></ul>
  • 12. Those Darn Squirrels <ul><li>Activity </li></ul><ul><li>Read the book aloud and talk about how the seasons change in the book. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>List on the board the following discussion topics: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What weather changes occur with each of the four seasons in temperate climates? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How does the season changes affect the natural environment, your activities, and the clothing you wear? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What is your favorite season? Why? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Pass out a blank white sheet of paper and explain art activity </li></ul><ul><ul><li>On white paper, use washable paint and paintbrushes to paint one picture that shows something relating to each of the four seasons. Include plants, animals, clothing, and activities. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>After the students complete the painting have them write on the back of the paper what their painting is about. Tell students to use descriptive words to explain each part of their painting. </li></ul><ul><li>Then have each student read the description of their painting to the classroom. </li></ul><ul><li>Standards </li></ul><ul><li>Science 2.3.1 -Investigate by observing and then describe that some events in nature have a repeating pattern, such as seasons, day and night, and migrations. </li></ul><ul><li>Language Arts 2.7.12- Use descriptive words when speaking about people, places, things, and events. </li></ul><ul><li>Gardner </li></ul><ul><li>Bodily Kinesthetic ( Hands on, Painting) </li></ul><ul><li>Spatial ( Create painting about four seasons) </li></ul>
  • 13. Stellaluna <ul><li>Review from Amazon.com </li></ul><ul><li>Attacked by an owl, Stellaluna (a fruit bat) is separated from her mother and taken in by a bird and her nestlings. Dutifully, she tries to accommodate--she eats insects, hangs head up, and sleeps at night, as Mama Bird says she must--but once Stellaluna learns to fly, it's a huge relief when her own mother finds her and explains that the behavior that comes naturally is appropriate to her species. With a warm, nicely honed narration, Cannon strikes just the right balance between accurate portrayal of the bats and the fantasy that dramatizes their characteristics. Her illustrations, in luminous acrylics and color pencils, are exquisite. The appealingly furry, wide-eyed, fawn-colored bats have both scientific precision and real character; they're displayed against intense skies or the soft browns and greens of the woodland in spare, beautifully constructed (occasionally even humorous) compositions. </li></ul>
  • 14. Stellaluna <ul><li>Activity </li></ul><ul><li>Read the book aloud to the class </li></ul><ul><li>Discuss how Stellaluna gets lost and lives with the family of birds </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Point out that the bird family gave Stellaluna food and shelter, even though they are not the same type of animal. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Discuss how animals help each other out with shelter and food in nature. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Have students write a brief narrative about a time were lost, if the students haven't been lost have them create a story about being lost. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Make sure the students include a setting, characters, objects , and events in their narrative. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Tell students that the events in their story must in order of how it happened. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Each student will work alone and create their own narrative </li></ul><ul><li>Standards </li></ul><ul><li>Science 2.4.2-Observe that and describe how animals may use plants, or even other animals, for shelter and nesting. </li></ul><ul><li>Language Arts 2.5.1- Write brief narratives based on experiences that: move through a logical sequence of events (chronological order, order of importance) and describe the setting, characters, objects, and events in detail. </li></ul><ul><li>Gardner </li></ul><ul><li>Intrapersonal (working alone, a chance to be individual) </li></ul><ul><li>Verbal Linguistic (write a narrative) </li></ul>
  • 15. I Love Rocks <ul><li>Review from Amazon.com </li></ul><ul><li>I Love Rocks is a rookie reader these books actively engage young readers, encouraging language development, building fluency, and promoting independent reading. By targeting a skill, like learning about opposites, young readers are building fundamental reading skills with the help of fun, lively, colorfully illustrated stories. </li></ul>
  • 16. I Love Rocks <ul><li>Activity </li></ul><ul><li>Show an example rock to the classroom and ask students to describe the rock is it big, small, smooth, bumpy, light, dark, spotted, heavy, round, flat. These are all ways to classify rocks, and the book I Love Rocks talks about all the different types of rocks. Then have the students estimate the weight of the rock. Take different estimations from the students; after that show the students how to measure the weight of the rock on the scale. Students will have to complete these steps in their groups later in the activity. </li></ul><ul><li>Take the students outside to the playground or parking lot and have each students find 5 rocks. </li></ul><ul><li>Take the students back to the classroom and split them into groups </li></ul><ul><li>Have the groups put all their rocks together and classify them by size. Once the rocks have classified by size, have the students pick another way to classify the rocks. Remind them of the ways discussed earlier. </li></ul><ul><li>Finally have the groups take their largest and smallest rocks and estimate its weight. Record the groups guesses on the board, and then have each group weigh their rocks on the scale. See if the groups estimations were close to the actual rock weight. ( Maybe even give a prize to the winning group!) </li></ul><ul><li>Standards </li></ul><ul><li>Science 2.3.3 - Investigate by observing and then describing chunks of rocks and their many sizes and shapes, from boulders to grains of sand and even smaller. </li></ul><ul><li>Math 2.5.6 -Estimate weight and use a given object to measure the weight of other objects </li></ul><ul><li>Gardner </li></ul><ul><li>Naturalistic </li></ul><ul><li>Mathematical </li></ul><ul><li>Bodily- Kinaesthtic </li></ul><ul><li>Interpersonal </li></ul>
  • 17. Telling Time: How to Tell Time on Digital and Analog Clocks! <ul><li>Review from Amazon.com </li></ul><ul><li>Beginning with a robust &quot;TICK&quot; and ending with an equally bold &quot;TOCK,&quot; Older acts as both an encouraging coach and cheerleader for youngsters learning about time. He defines the concept clearly, citing two meanings-when things happen and how long things take. After delving into how time can be broken down (from a second to a century), the author gets down to the nitty-gritty of telling time. He begins with the easier digital-clock face. Once that is thoroughly explained, he ponders the more difficult analog clock. Readers are taken through the process of reading it, and little tests are thrown in to keep students on track. Answers are given in the text, along with rewarding smiley faces. (&quot;Yes! It's seven-thirty. You deserve another smiley face!&quot;) The cartoon illustrations, showing children and many, many types of clocks are colorful, plentiful, and inviting. A rather silly poem is appended to help readers remember how long things take: &quot;Sixty seconds make a minute,/that's a lot of seconds, innit?&quot; Although a.m. and p.m. are discussed (&quot;-breakfast is at six A.M., but supper is at six P.M.&quot;) </li></ul>
  • 18. Telling Time <ul><li>Activity </li></ul><ul><li>After reading the book have the students go back to their seat and fold a piece of paper into fourths </li></ul><ul><ul><li>In the first box have students estimate when they wake up in the morning for school, the second what time they eat lunch, what time they eat dinner, and what time they go to bed. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Get a clock with hands and display some of the times the students have written down </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Explain 5 minute intervals to the students, and then explain how quarter hours work. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Explain the difference between the a.m. and p.m. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Show students on the clock when the time changes from a.m. and p.m. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Finally ask questions to assess the students. Use the times the students wrote down, and ask them questions about them (like when do you eat lunch the a.m. or p.m.?) </li></ul><ul><li>Standards </li></ul><ul><li>Science 2.2.2 -Make quantitative estimates of familiar lengths, weights, and time intervals and check them by measurement. </li></ul><ul><li>Math 2.5.9 - Tell time to the nearest quarter hour, be able to tell five-minute intervals, and know the difference between a.m. and p.m. </li></ul><ul><li>Gardner </li></ul><ul><li>Logical </li></ul>
  • 19. Beautiful Bananas <ul><li>Review from Amazon.com </li></ul><ul><li>This circular tale from East Africa incorporates familiar folkloric elements. A little girl sets out to take a gift of bananas to her grandfather. Along the way, she encounters a variety of jungle animals and each one causes an accident that results in her losing Granddad's present. The animal then replaces the lost object with a new one. By the time she arrives at the man's house, she once again has as a gift &quot;a beautiful bunch of bananas.&quot; The cheerful, bold artwork complements the mood and setting of the story. The straightforward, repetitive plot is fast paced and will encourage children to anticipate the next calamity, and guess what the new item will be. With bright, eye-catching artwork and a simple text, this story makes a good read-aloud. </li></ul>
  • 20. Beautiful Bananas <ul><li>Read the book aloud and talk about all the different animals mentioned in the book. </li></ul><ul><li>Have the students pick an animal to research, it can be an animal from the story or it can be a different one. </li></ul><ul><li>The students should find facts about the animal, they should first find what it eats, where it lives, and what part of the world it is located in. Then find any other interesting facts or details about the animal. </li></ul><ul><li>The students should record their research on a piece of paper. </li></ul><ul><li>Finally have the students present their research, and recognize why the animal lives where it does. Also recognize that the things it eats and it’s shelter depends on the part of the world it lives in. </li></ul><ul><li>Standards </li></ul><ul><li>Science 2.4.4 - Recognize and explain that living things are found almost everywhere in the world and that there are somewhat different kinds in different places. </li></ul><ul><li>Language Arts 2.7.9- Report on a topic with supportive facts and details. </li></ul><ul><li>Gardner </li></ul><ul><li>Intrapersonal </li></ul><ul><li>Verbal Linguistic </li></ul>

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