Southern Fried RiceSouthern Fried RiceLife in A Chinese Laundry in The Deep SouthLife in A Chinese Laundry in The Deep Sou...
Early Chinese in GeorgiaEarly Chinese in Georgia Almost all ran laundries, except in Augusta andAlmost all ran laundries,...
Chinese Spread Across GeorgiaChinese Spread Across Georgia
Sam Lee LaundrySam Lee Laundry19061906Sam Lee Laundry1953
Mulberry St. A CenturyMulberry St. A CenturyApartApart
My ‘Link” to OurMy ‘Link” to OurFamily PastFamily Past
Jung Ben and Quan Shee,Jung Ben and Quan Shee,19281928
Importance of Merchant StatusImportance of Merchant Status
Paper Son of Alleged FatherPaper Son of Alleged Father
Father Confronted at 1921Father Confronted at 1921Immigration InterrogationImmigration Interrogation
Father Confronted at 1928Father Confronted at 1928Immigration Reentry HearingImmigration Reentry Hearing
Mother’s “Morality”Mother’s “Morality”InterrogationInterrogation
Mother Failed One Test, But AdmittedMother Failed One Test, But Admitted
Father’s Few Moments ofFather’s Few Moments ofRestRest
Mother Out of the LaundryMother Out of the Laundry
““Great Southern Laundry”Great Southern Laundry”
Nearest Chinese Were 100 MilesNearest Chinese Were 100 MilesAwayAway Uncle Joe and Other Chinese laundrymen in AtlantaUnc...
G-G-father’s 19 Chinese Laundries in theG-G-father’s 19 Chinese Laundries in theSouthSouth
Southern Segregation, preSouthern Segregation, pre19551955 A Child Can Learn FromA Child Can Learn From JustJust Observin...
Where We Were ‘White-ish’Where We Were ‘White-ish’ Picture Shows (i.e. movies), restaurantsPicture Shows (i.e. movies), r...
Where We Were Not So WhiteWhere We Were Not So White
Seen As Exotic Objects ofSeen As Exotic Objects ofCuriosityCuriosity
Our ‘Odd’Our ‘Odd’EdiblesEdibles
Mocking ChineseMocking ChineseNew Year FestivitiesNew Year Festivities
Chop Chop,Chop Chop,My Only ChineseMy Only ChineseMedia Role ModelMedia Role Model
Chinese As BuffoonsChinese As Buffoons
Chinese Women AsChinese Women AsSinister :Sinister :The ‘Dragon Lady’The ‘Dragon Lady’
In 1910 A Chinese ‘Alien’ DeniedIn 1910 A Chinese ‘Alien’ DeniedEntry To A White SchoolEntry To A White School
In 1943 We Once GotIn 1943 We Once Got‘Special Attention’ For Being‘Special Attention’ For BeingChineseChinese
In 1943 Macon Honored Her But In 1910In 1943 Macon Honored Her But In 1910Denied Her Entry To A White SchoolDenied Her Ent...
What Our Parents Taught UsWhat Our Parents Taught UsAbout Race and PrejudiceAbout Race and Prejudice What to expect, and ...
Macon’s Tribute After We LeftMacon’s Tribute After We Left
Yes, We WereYes, We Were NotNot First Chinese inFirst Chinese inMaconMacon
Father’sFather’sImmigratioImmigrationnCourtshipCourtship
Converting The ‘HeathenConverting The ‘HeathenChinee’Chinee’
Moving to A ChineseMoving to A ChineseCommunityCommunity Why We MovedWhy We Moved Accepting San Francisco ChineseAccepti...
Ethnic IdentityEthnic IdentityDilemmasDilemmas Amongst WhitesAmongst Whites ‘‘White’ wannabe (passing/assimilating)White...
‘‘Southern Belle’ SistersSouthern Belle’ SistersCity College of San Francisco SweetheartCity College of San Francisco Swe...
Father and Mother’sFather and Mother’s‘Retirement’‘Retirement’
Mother Became A Stock MarketMother Became A Stock MarketPlayerPlayer
Some Examples Our Parents SetSome Examples Our Parents Set(in sometimes odd ways)(in sometimes odd ways) Self-reliance (m...
Thank You….Questions?Thank You….Questions?
Southern Fried Rice: Life in A Chinese Laundry in the Deep South
Southern Fried Rice: Life in A Chinese Laundry in the Deep South
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Southern Fried Rice: Life in A Chinese Laundry in the Deep South

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Author John Jung discusses his memoir at a Book Talk at Rosemead, CA. Library, May 23, 2013

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  • The Macon City Directory showed that our laundry operated was in the same building on Mulberry Street as early as 1888.
  • Uncle Joe ran a Chinese laundry in Atlanta, about 100 miles north of Macon. Uncle was separated from his wife and 3 sons who were still in China.. initially if the immigrant also had to take care of a family. his family was unable to come to America until around 1950 Not having his own family with him in Atlanta, Uncle would come by train to visit us every few months on a Sunday. This was very exciting for us, not only to see an Uncle who was very indulgent and eager to see his nieces and nephews, but because he was a Chinese. Once in a while Father would take me, and sometimes my sisters, on Sundays by train to visit Uncle in his laundry for the day. Father sometimes also squeezed in a short visit to a second cousin, Mon Kow Cheung, who had a laundry in Atlanta This family had five children close in age to us, so that we would socialize with them for an hour or two. During the typical visit, the two brothers would sit in the laundry next to Uncle’s bachelor sleeping quarters and gossip about relatives or discuss worldly matters that I didn’t fully comprehend. On these visits to Atlanta to visit Uncle, we sometimes met a few other Chinese laundrymen. Listening to their conversations about other Chinese men from their home villages running laundries in towns in several southern states, I formed the erroneous impression that all Chinese in America ran laundries. In Atlanta, a family association raised funds to provide a meeting and social hall on the second floor of a building on Whitehall Street not far from the train terminal. It also served as a place where the old, and not so old, Chinese men would congregate from nearby small towns on Sundays, their day off from work, to socialize. They wouldgamble, gossip, share useful information, and ralk about the old country..
  • Fortunately, I was not exposed to or aware of the extremely violent forms of racism against Blacks, andin a few instances to Chinese, that occurred in the South. Still, there were many obvious and blatant expressions of white supremacy that any child could witness on a daily basis.
  • We were accepted as ‘white’ inasmuch as we could attend white schools and theaters and use white public toilet and drinking facilities.
  • Stereotypes of Chinese were very negative and demeaning.
  • In 1908 the Macon paper announced the New Year’s celebration of its 11 ‘celestials,’ as Chinese were called then, focusing on foods from China such as ‘dried fish with staring eyes,’ birds nests, and other delicacies. This mocking tone toward Chinese customs encouraged racial intolerance. With this attitude, it is not surprising that years later when I lived there, Both white and black people often reacted to me with: questions about curious and exotic customs and practices in China or made fun about Chinese customs and language, or spoke in mock Chinese while stretching their eyelids
  • Newspaper accounts mocking our food and comprehension of English could only serve to foster and reinforce attitudes of American superiority over Chinese ways.
  • Chinese New Year’s day customs were seen as foreign and odd
  • I was fortunately spared learning about Fu Manchu, Charlie Chan and his Number one son. But in one of my favorite action comic books, Blackhawk, I had to suffer the indignity of how the Chinese sidekick, with the condescending name, CHOP CHOP, was depicted The squadron was multi-ethnic, with Blackhawk, the American leading a group that included a Frenchman, Dutchman, Norwegian, and even a Chinaman named Chop Chop. All of Blackhawk’s white crew members wore dark blue military uniforms, had revolvers, and piloted their own fighter planes, but Chop Chop wore Chinese-style garb, had a pigtail, buck teeth, and rode in the back seat of Blackhawk’s plane. The other members used their firearms to fight the villains while Chop Chop ran around using only a meat cleaver as his weapon He was about as good as it got in those days as far as any positive Chinese male role model. .
  • ,
  • Chinese female characters were even less frequently portrayed and never in a positive way. Thus, the only Chinese woman in a comic strip I saw was the sinister “dragon lady,” from Terry and the Pirates . Consequently, it should be no surprise that I was conflicted about being identified as Chinese as I was
  • Example of sources of attitudes toward Chinese in Macon, and throughout the South
  • Madame Chiang Kai-Shek, the First Lady of China, came to Macon in 1943 after visiting numerous sites in the U. S. during this trip to rally support and aid for the war effort led by her husband against the Japanese. She was here to receive an honorary doctorate at Wesleyan. during the height of World War II. Mei-Ling Soong, her maiden name, had lived in Macon when she was an adolescent because her two older sisters attended Wesleyan College there in the early 1900s. this trip to the U. S. also placed significant attention on immigration policy toward Chinese and probably was a factor in leading President Roosevelt to finally end the Anti-Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882. Someone decided that we four Jung children, being the only children in town of Chinese descent, should be invited to attend the festivities. We were paraded out for public display. I was only 5 or 6, and none of meant much to me, although the press release gushingly described our encounter of a few seconds with Madame Chiang as a thrill that we “tiny Jungs” had eagerly awaited. The most I recall was that it was a hot summer day, and I was more interested in was finding a shady spot than in getting a glimpse of Madame Chiang. This incident illustrates how no matter how ‘American’ we children may have felt or wanted to be, in the eyes of others, we would always be seen as ‘Chinese,’ even if we hardly knew the culture of China or its language.
  • irony
  • Mother periodically cautioned us about how whites discriminated against Chinese. She told about times when white children would come by the laundry and taunt them, with chants of “Chinese eat rats!” , during the war years, whites would taunt her on the street, making nonsensical sounds pretending they were speaking Chinese or they would make derogatory comments such as “Chinese eat dogs.” She recited instances of violence against Chinese, including homicide, in cities all over the United States that she read about in the Chinese newspaper. She would tell us how China suffered when England forced opium into China in middle of the 19 th century to destroy the will and resistance of the people to British domination. Mother also told us, on numerous occasions, how Father, like other Chinese immigrants, had to resort to buying false documents to enter the United States as paper sons. I was upset, angry, and surprised that the U. S. treated Chinese so unjustly by excluding them, and no other group, from the opportunity to enter the country legally. I was torn between feelings of shame for being ‘illegal’ and fear that someday my parents would be apprehended and deported. It also bothered me because I felt that if my parents lied to enter the U. S., they were doing something wrong. Mother urged us to avoid confrontations and to ignore racial insults because she felt we had no power to deal with hostile people. Our parents often reminded us of our ‘Chinese-ness’ in a very positive way. They told us of the history of China, and how it was a great and successful civilization over thousands of years, although it had suffered from some inept Emperors who were responsible for the country’s downfall in modern times. We learned in school about the great achievements of Chinese civilization and it made us proud to be Chinese.
  • We kids increasingly questioned some of their plans and expectations for us because our experiences were different from theirs. We had white schoolmates and playmates, and of course, no Chinese friends or age mates. My parents realized an urgent need to move the family to California when my sisters reached adolescence. In San Francisco, because of its large Chinese population, our parents hoped their daughters could meet, and hopefully marry, Chinese boys. If they remained in Macon, we children might enter mixed-race marriages, which my parents did not consider desirable. especially in the South. At age 15, I thought I had a good idea of what it meant to be Chinese. That is how old I was when we moved to San Francisco where I was expecting to finally join “my people” and immediately feel at ease. I had a rude awakening because I was quite different from the San Francisco Chinese of my age. They had grown up immersed in Chinese ways and had lived in close proximity to many other Chinese for all of their lives. I discovered that I did not really know how to “be Chinese.” In San Francisco, we had ample opportunity to develop new friendships through social contact with Chinese Americans. Most of the Chinese of my age that I met were second generation. Since their parents, like mine, were immigrants, most of them were bi-lingual in varying degree while their parents had limited English language skills or preferred to speak in Chinese. Generational conflicts were common. I had some difficulty in identifying with the Chinese-American students in school, because the Chinese Americans in San Francisco seemed so different from me in many ways. Most of them had grown up in Chinatown, attended de facto segregated schools that were predominantly Chinese. They were influenced by Chinese customs and culture all of their lives and were thoroughly self-identified by their Chinese heritage. They not only could speak Chinese much better than I could, but some could read and write Chinese to some extent because from an early age their parents had sent them to Chinese language school after their American school hours.
  • A. Among Whites: Wanted to assimilate or pass to avoid the stigma of being Chinese The racist stereotypical images of Chinese that emphasized slanted eyes, straight hair, queues, sing-song Chinese music and spoken language, idiographic Chinese written characters, and exotic clothing items like coolie hats had subtly poisoned my desire to identify as Chinese B. Among Whites: I am expected to be CULTURAL EXPERT “ My sense of ethnic identity changed when I am in a non Chinese community, where I am perceived as an expert about Chinese culture by virtue of my ethnicity and teased when I talk about Chinese events or customs with anything but certainly.” Elaine Chan A. Among Chinese: I wanted to be accepted by Chinese Americans as one of them B. Among Chinese (I felt NOT Chinese ENOUGH) It changes again when I am in Chinatown where the majority of the residents are recent immigrants from areas of China…about which I know very little. I do not assume that I understand their experiences…Elaine Chan.
  • Southern Fried Rice: Life in A Chinese Laundry in the Deep South

    1. 1. Southern Fried RiceSouthern Fried RiceLife in A Chinese Laundry in The Deep SouthLife in A Chinese Laundry in The Deep SouthJOHN JUNGRosemead LibraryMay 23, 2013
    2. 2. Early Chinese in GeorgiaEarly Chinese in Georgia Almost all ran laundries, except in Augusta andAlmost all ran laundries, except in Augusta andSavannahSavannah Population peak about 1900 (until 1960s)Population peak about 1900 (until 1960s) Almost no Chinese womenAlmost no Chinese women By 1920s, increase in Chinese familiesBy 1920s, increase in Chinese families
    3. 3. Chinese Spread Across GeorgiaChinese Spread Across Georgia
    4. 4. Sam Lee LaundrySam Lee Laundry19061906Sam Lee Laundry1953
    5. 5. Mulberry St. A CenturyMulberry St. A CenturyApartApart
    6. 6. My ‘Link” to OurMy ‘Link” to OurFamily PastFamily Past
    7. 7. Jung Ben and Quan Shee,Jung Ben and Quan Shee,19281928
    8. 8. Importance of Merchant StatusImportance of Merchant Status
    9. 9. Paper Son of Alleged FatherPaper Son of Alleged Father
    10. 10. Father Confronted at 1921Father Confronted at 1921Immigration InterrogationImmigration Interrogation
    11. 11. Father Confronted at 1928Father Confronted at 1928Immigration Reentry HearingImmigration Reentry Hearing
    12. 12. Mother’s “Morality”Mother’s “Morality”InterrogationInterrogation
    13. 13. Mother Failed One Test, But AdmittedMother Failed One Test, But Admitted
    14. 14. Father’s Few Moments ofFather’s Few Moments ofRestRest
    15. 15. Mother Out of the LaundryMother Out of the Laundry
    16. 16. ““Great Southern Laundry”Great Southern Laundry”
    17. 17. Nearest Chinese Were 100 MilesNearest Chinese Were 100 MilesAwayAway Uncle Joe and Other Chinese laundrymen in AtlantaUncle Joe and Other Chinese laundrymen in Atlanta
    18. 18. G-G-father’s 19 Chinese Laundries in theG-G-father’s 19 Chinese Laundries in theSouthSouth
    19. 19. Southern Segregation, preSouthern Segregation, pre19551955 A Child Can Learn FromA Child Can Learn From JustJust ObservingObserving Whites And Blacks: Separate BUTWhites And Blacks: Separate BUT UnequalUnequal Where Did Chinese Fit?Where Did Chinese Fit? My drinking fountain ‘mistake’My drinking fountain ‘mistake’ Disapproval of my Black playmateDisapproval of my Black playmate
    20. 20. Where We Were ‘White-ish’Where We Were ‘White-ish’ Picture Shows (i.e. movies), restaurantsPicture Shows (i.e. movies), restaurants Public facilities (fountains, toilets)Public facilities (fountains, toilets) Buses and trainsBuses and trains Schools, librariesSchools, libraries
    21. 21. Where We Were Not So WhiteWhere We Were Not So White
    22. 22. Seen As Exotic Objects ofSeen As Exotic Objects ofCuriosityCuriosity
    23. 23. Our ‘Odd’Our ‘Odd’EdiblesEdibles
    24. 24. Mocking ChineseMocking ChineseNew Year FestivitiesNew Year Festivities
    25. 25. Chop Chop,Chop Chop,My Only ChineseMy Only ChineseMedia Role ModelMedia Role Model
    26. 26. Chinese As BuffoonsChinese As Buffoons
    27. 27. Chinese Women AsChinese Women AsSinister :Sinister :The ‘Dragon Lady’The ‘Dragon Lady’
    28. 28. In 1910 A Chinese ‘Alien’ DeniedIn 1910 A Chinese ‘Alien’ DeniedEntry To A White SchoolEntry To A White School
    29. 29. In 1943 We Once GotIn 1943 We Once Got‘Special Attention’ For Being‘Special Attention’ For BeingChineseChinese
    30. 30. In 1943 Macon Honored Her But In 1910In 1943 Macon Honored Her But In 1910Denied Her Entry To A White SchoolDenied Her Entry To A White School
    31. 31. What Our Parents Taught UsWhat Our Parents Taught UsAbout Race and PrejudiceAbout Race and Prejudice What to expect, and whyWhat to expect, and why Learning of racism and Chinese exclusionLearning of racism and Chinese exclusion How to react to racial confrontationsHow to react to racial confrontations Pride in China’s historyPride in China’s history
    32. 32. Macon’s Tribute After We LeftMacon’s Tribute After We Left
    33. 33. Yes, We WereYes, We Were NotNot First Chinese inFirst Chinese inMaconMacon
    34. 34. Father’sFather’sImmigratioImmigrationnCourtshipCourtship
    35. 35. Converting The ‘HeathenConverting The ‘HeathenChinee’Chinee’
    36. 36. Moving to A ChineseMoving to A ChineseCommunityCommunity Why We MovedWhy We Moved Accepting San Francisco ChineseAccepting San Francisco Chinese Gaining Acceptance From S. F. ChineseGaining Acceptance From S. F. Chinese Learning New Ways of Being ‘Chinese’Learning New Ways of Being ‘Chinese’
    37. 37. Ethnic IdentityEthnic IdentityDilemmasDilemmas Amongst WhitesAmongst Whites ‘‘White’ wannabe (passing/assimilating)White’ wannabe (passing/assimilating) Viewed As Chinese (cultural expert)Viewed As Chinese (cultural expert) Amongst ChineseAmongst Chinese Wannabe ‘Chinese’Wannabe ‘Chinese’ Feeling not Chinese ‘enough’Feeling not Chinese ‘enough’
    38. 38. ‘‘Southern Belle’ SistersSouthern Belle’ SistersCity College of San Francisco SweetheartCity College of San Francisco SweetheartBallBall
    39. 39. Father and Mother’sFather and Mother’s‘Retirement’‘Retirement’
    40. 40. Mother Became A Stock MarketMother Became A Stock MarketPlayerPlayer
    41. 41. Some Examples Our Parents SetSome Examples Our Parents Set(in sometimes odd ways)(in sometimes odd ways) Self-reliance (mother’s home cures)Self-reliance (mother’s home cures) Saving for a rainy day (stash the cash)Saving for a rainy day (stash the cash) Sacrifice for family (father holding the fort)Sacrifice for family (father holding the fort) Meet challenges (mother had to head householdMeet challenges (mother had to head householdwhen we moved)when we moved)
    42. 42. Thank You….Questions?Thank You….Questions?

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