Writing for Broadcast Mr. Jeremy Rinkel
Two Different Story Types <ul><li>News features </li></ul><ul><li>Breaking news or announcements </li></ul>
News Features <ul><li>Between 3 and 7 minutes long </li></ul><ul><li>Usually about things that happened in the past </li><...
Storyboard <ul><li>Explains how audio (sounds) and the shots (visual details) will present the researched background facts...
Breaking News/Daily Announcements <ul><li>Stories happening today or in the near future </li></ul><ul><li>Usually written ...
Breaking News/Daily Announcements <ul><li>Usually have a short time to contact sources to confirm information </li></ul><u...
Basic Rules of Writing for Broadcast <ul><li>Write conversationally  </li></ul><ul><li>Write concisely </li></ul><ul><li>S...
Basic Rules of Writing for Broadcast <ul><li>Don’t scare the viewers </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t give orders </li></ul><ul><li...
Basic Rules of Writing for Broadcast <ul><li>Don’t characterize the news as good, bad, interesting or shocking– (leave it ...
Basic Rules of Writing for Broadcast <ul><li>Don’t start a lead sentence with the name of an unknown or unfamiliar person ...
 
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Writing For Broadcast

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Writing For Broadcast

  1. 1. Writing for Broadcast Mr. Jeremy Rinkel
  2. 2. Two Different Story Types <ul><li>News features </li></ul><ul><li>Breaking news or announcements </li></ul>
  3. 3. News Features <ul><li>Between 3 and 7 minutes long </li></ul><ul><li>Usually about things that happened in the past </li></ul><ul><li>Uses a storyboard </li></ul>
  4. 4. Storyboard <ul><li>Explains how audio (sounds) and the shots (visual details) will present the researched background facts and information </li></ul>
  5. 5. Breaking News/Daily Announcements <ul><li>Stories happening today or in the near future </li></ul><ul><li>Usually written into a teleprompter to be read by on-air announcers </li></ul><ul><li>Presented in short stories between 15 seconds and one minute </li></ul>
  6. 6. Breaking News/Daily Announcements <ul><li>Usually have a short time to contact sources to confirm information </li></ul><ul><li>Normal speaking rate/pace </li></ul><ul><ul><li>65 words = 30 seconds </li></ul></ul>
  7. 7. Basic Rules of Writing for Broadcast <ul><li>Write conversationally </li></ul><ul><li>Write concisely </li></ul><ul><li>Simplify complicated ideas </li></ul><ul><li>Research and verify all information </li></ul><ul><li>Avoid newspaper construction in your writing (the viewer hears your story) </li></ul>
  8. 8. Basic Rules of Writing for Broadcast <ul><li>Don’t scare the viewers </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t give orders </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t bury a strong verb in a noun </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t start a story with “as expected” or “in a surprise move” </li></ul>
  9. 9. Basic Rules of Writing for Broadcast <ul><li>Don’t characterize the news as good, bad, interesting or shocking– (leave it to the viewer) </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t start a lead sentence with a participle phrase (-ing word) or dependent clause </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t start a story with “there is”, “there are”, or “it is” </li></ul>
  10. 10. Basic Rules of Writing for Broadcast <ul><li>Don’t start a lead sentence with the name of an unknown or unfamiliar person </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t write a first sentence with yesterday or continues </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t start a story with “another”, “more”, or “once again” </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t lose or fail to reach the viewers </li></ul>
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