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Chapters 11 and 25 Japanese Art
Chapters 11 and 25 Japanese Art
Chapters 11 and 25 Japanese Art
Chapters 11 and 25 Japanese Art
Chapters 11 and 25 Japanese Art
Chapters 11 and 25 Japanese Art
Chapters 11 and 25 Japanese Art
Chapters 11 and 25 Japanese Art
Chapters 11 and 25 Japanese Art
Chapters 11 and 25 Japanese Art
Chapters 11 and 25 Japanese Art
Chapters 11 and 25 Japanese Art
Chapters 11 and 25 Japanese Art
Chapters 11 and 25 Japanese Art
Chapters 11 and 25 Japanese Art
Chapters 11 and 25 Japanese Art
Chapters 11 and 25 Japanese Art
Chapters 11 and 25 Japanese Art
Chapters 11 and 25 Japanese Art
Chapters 11 and 25 Japanese Art
Chapters 11 and 25 Japanese Art
Chapters 11 and 25 Japanese Art
Chapters 11 and 25 Japanese Art
Chapters 11 and 25 Japanese Art
Chapters 11 and 25 Japanese Art
Chapters 11 and 25 Japanese Art
Chapters 11 and 25 Japanese Art
Chapters 11 and 25 Japanese Art
Chapters 11 and 25 Japanese Art
Chapters 11 and 25 Japanese Art
Chapters 11 and 25 Japanese Art
Chapters 11 and 25 Japanese Art
Chapters 11 and 25 Japanese Art
Chapters 11 and 25 Japanese Art
Chapters 11 and 25 Japanese Art
Chapters 11 and 25 Japanese Art
Chapters 11 and 25 Japanese Art
Chapters 11 and 25 Japanese Art
Chapters 11 and 25 Japanese Art
Chapters 11 and 25 Japanese Art
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Chapters 11 and 25 Japanese Art

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  • Compare printmaking to Andy Warhol’s Factory products.Interested western artists through use of large, flat areas of color; unchanging tones; lack of shadow; odd angles of composition; cropped images. (Think Impressionism, Roy Lichtenstein)
  • Transcript

    • 1. Chapters 11 and 25: Japanese Art
      AP Art History
      Magister Ricard
    • 2.
    • 3. Key Concepts
      Deep reaching artistic tradition
      Heavily influenced by Zen Buddhism
      Tea ceremony unique to Japanese culture
      Ukiyo-e woodblock prints heavily influenced western art (Impressionism)
    • 4. Historical Background
      As an island nation, one of the few countries successfully invaded from outside
      Japan has been able to preserve its cultural traditions
      Commodore Perry helps formulate a trade agreement with Japan in 1854
      Ukiyo-e prints are sold to European markets
      Not valued by upper classes in Japan
    • 5. Historic Periods in Japanese Art
    • 6. Patronage
      Japanese artists worked on commission
      Some for royal court, some for religious patrons
      Masters ran workshops with assistants
      Usually family run business, inherited
      Master created the key components, assistants tended to the details
      Painting esteemed art form
      Both genders learned to paint
    • 7. Japanese culture
      Chapters 11 and 25: Japanese Art
    • 8. Zen Buddhism
      Zen is a school of Buddhist thought
      Rejects worldliness, material possessions and vanity
      Focuses on self-control, courage, and loyalty
      Meditation is key for enlightenment
      Intuition and introspection not books
      Samurai exemplify Zen teachings
    • 9. Shinto
      “The Way of the Gods”
      The Kojiki contains the myth of creation of the Japanese islands
      Paradise created by the Gods
      Animism – everything contains kami
      Impurity arises from lack of awareness (of kami)
    • 10. Buddhism and Shinto
      Syncretic in nature
      Shinto usually for “life” rituals
      Buddhism for “death” rituals
      Birth rites use Shinto ritual
      Funeral arrangements typically refer to Buddhist tradition
    • 11. Japanese Tea Ceremony
      Minimalist details disguise careful social ritual
      Ceremony built around 4 main principles
      Purity
      Harmony
      Respect
      Tranquility
      Designed around a small space for about 5 people, featuring simple yet elegant décor
      Ritual example
    • 12.
    • 13.
    • 14. Japanese Architecture
      Chapters 11 and 25: Japanese Art
    • 15. Characteristics of Japanese Architecture
      Influence of Zen philosophy calls for simple elegance
      Usually single story, made of wood, and should harmonize with nature
      Wood is appreciated naturally
      Floors are raised above ground to reduce humidity
      Eaves are long to create shadows for summer
      Steep roofs to allow quick rain and snow runoff
    • 16. Characteristics of Japanese Architecture
      Interior spaces are highly mobile, using sliding screens to divide rooms
      Zen gardens feature sand raked meticulously around stones and plants
      For spiritual nourishment
    • 17.
    • 18.
    • 19.
    • 20.
    • 21.
    • 22. Japanese Sculpture
      Chapters 11 and 25: Japanese Art
    • 23. Characteristics of Sculpture
      Ranges from abstract (haniwa figures) to verism(samurais, priests)
      Masks are highly prized, those used in religious rituals called Noh plays
      Noh masks are small wooden masks that reveal emotion of character to crowd
    • 24.
    • 25.
    • 26.
    • 27.
    • 28.
    • 29.
    • 30.
    • 31.
    • 32. Japanese Painting and Printmaking
      Chapters 11 and 25: Japanese Art
    • 33. Characteristics of Painting/Printmaking
      Genre painting dominated by ukiyo-e “pictures of the floating world”
      “floating” = Buddhist transient nature of life
      Popular scenes of everyday pleasures
      Flourished between 1650s to 1850s
      Disdained by upper classes
    • 34. Characteristics of Painting/Printmaking
      Printmaking required a publisher and an artist
      Publisher determined what was to be created
      Artist created it via woodblock carving
      Initially black and white, color came into printmaking in 18th century
      Colors applied one at a time, very popular but time consuming
    • 35.
    • 36.
    • 37.
    • 38.
    • 39.
    • 40. Summary
      With great stability comes a long artistic and cultural tradition
      Japanese architecture harmonizes with nature and uses its materials naturally, organically
      Shaped by Shinto and Zen Buddhism
      Scrolls were used, like in China, but Japan develops ukiyo-e prints

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