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Motivation: The Art and Science of Inspiring Classroom Success
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Motivation: The Art and Science of Inspiring Classroom Success

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The traditional reward-punishment model does little to promote achievement; however, concrete researched-based ways to motivate students do exist. Motivation as it applies to the learning process will …

The traditional reward-punishment model does little to promote achievement; however, concrete researched-based ways to motivate students do exist. Motivation as it applies to the learning process will be surveyed: basic human needs; the driving force behind all human behavior; inspiration and peak performance; energizing classroom strategies; and frameworks that encourage change and achievement.

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  • When teachers and students are having fun, learning is deeper and stronger
  • Transcript

    • 1. Motivation: The Art and Science of Inspiring Classroom Success A Three Credit Graduate Course Designed by Mike Kuczala, Director of instruction The Regional Training Center
    • 2. “To know and not to do is not to know!” - Stephen Covey “[Students] who do the doing, and [students] who do the talking . . . DO THE LEARNING! - Eric Jensen
    • 3. How Does the Brain Prioritize Information? •Data Affecting Survival • Data Generating Emotions • Data for New Learning Source: How the Brain Learns by David Sousa; Corwin Press - 2006
    • 4. Survival – Emotions Learning The Whole Point behind Team Building and Ice Breakers
    • 5. Pain vs. Pleasure • How do you perceive pain/pleasure – i.e. what type of motivation? (Internal or external) • How does the pain/pleasure principle play out in the classroom? • What does it have to do with student success?
    • 6. Pain/Pleasure • To what length do we go to make sure students feel as comfortable and ready to learn as you did today? • How can teachers heighten pleasure and reduce pain for students? The brain must always feel safe in order to operate in the cognitive fashion we desire.
    • 7. What is it that my students are highly motivated to have? How can I use that in my teaching so my students will want to be there and be successful? ?
    • 8. Glasser’s Needs •Survival •Belonging •Power •Freedom •Fun
    • 9. Internal Control Theory is based upon the belief that people are internally, not externally motivated. Powerful instructions built into our genetic structure drive our behavior. 8
    • 10. Building a spirit of connection and community is essential to creating a need-satisfying school (classroom) characterized by high achievement. 9
    • 11. Tony Robbins – 6 Basic Human Needs • Certainty • Uncertainty • Significance • Connectedness • Contributing • Growth
    • 12. Power is gained through competence, achievement, and mastery. * Students who are academically competent are less likely to seek power in destructive ways. 10
    • 13. Academic environments • adequate freedom • within parameters that are safe, and • supportive of learning.
    • 14. Each time we learn something new we are having fun – a universal human motivator. 12
    • 15. Fun is the genetic payoff for learning.
    • 16. Behavior is always purposeful We continually strive to satisfy the needs that motivate us: to connect, to be powerful, to be free, to be playful, to survive.
    • 17. Internal control psychology We are goal-driven 14
    • 18. Setting goals may be the most significant act in the school improvement process, . Mike Schmoker Author of “First Things First: Demystifying Data Analysis (2003)” 15
    • 19. Research on Motivation Indicates that . . .
    • 20. Research on Motivation Indicates that . . .
    • 21. Research on Motivation Indicates that . . .
    • 22. Teach SMART Goal Setting Specific Measureable Attainable Realistic Time Oriented
    • 23. Research shows is the school-related factor most likely to affect student achievement!
    • 24. And to quote Harry Wong You ARE the difference in the lives of the students you teach!
    • 25. ? • Are your student’s basic human needs being met?
    • 26. ? • Are you creating an environment that encourages risk and makes risk manageable?
    • 27. ? • Are you clearly defining effort for your students?
    • 28. ? • Are you creating lessons that are relevant and directed by interest?
    • 29. ? • Are your students being encouraged to set goals for their learning?
    • 30. ? Could your answers have a profound effect on the unmotivated student?
    • 31. “We’re bribing students into compliance instead of challenging them into engagement.” Daniel H. Pink, DRIVE: THE SURPRISING TRUTH ABOUT WHAT MOTIVATES US (2009)
    • 32. Thanks for watching • This presentation is based on a graduate course for teachers available from The Regional Training Center in partnership with The College of New Jersey and Gratz College (PA, MD) • Available in many convenient locations in all three states • Available through RTC Online • www.theRTC.net • 800.433.4740

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