2011 Employer Health Benefits Chart Pack
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2011 Employer Health Benefits Chart Pack

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2011 Employer Health Benefits Chart Pack

2011 Employer Health Benefits Chart Pack

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2011 Employer Health Benefits Chart Pack 2011 Employer Health Benefits Chart Pack Presentation Transcript

  • Cumulative Increases in Health Insurance Premiums, Workers’ Contributions to Premiums, Inflation, and Workers’ Earnings, 1999-2011Source: Kaiser/HRET Survey of Employer-Sponsored HealthBenefits, 1999-2011. Bureau of Labor Statistics, ConsumerPrice Index, U.S. City Average of Annual Inflation (April toApril), 1999-2011; Bureau of Labor Statistics, SeasonallyAdjusted Data from the Current Employment Statistics Survey,1999-2011 (April to April).
  • Average Annual Premiums for Single and Family Coverage, 1999-2011* Estimate is statistically different from estimate for the previous year shown (p<.05).Source: Kaiser/HRET Survey of Employer-Sponsored Health Benefits, 1999-2011.
  • Average Annual Worker Premium Contributions Paid by Covered Workers for Single and Family Coverage, 1999-2011*Estimate is statistically different from estimate for the previous year shown (p<.05).Source: Kaiser/HRET Survey of Employer-Sponsored Health Benefits, 1999-2011.
  • Average Annual Worker Premium Contributions and Total Premiums for Covered Workers, Single and Family Coverage, by Firm Size, 2011 Single Coverage Family Coverage* Estimates are statistically different between AllSmall Firms and All Large Firms (p<.05).Source: Kaiser/HRET Survey of Employer-Sponsored Health Benefits, 2011.
  • Percentage of Covered Workers with No Premium Contribution or a Contribution of Greater than 50% of the Premium, 2011 Single Coverage Family Coverage*Estimate is statistically different between All Small Firms and All LargeFirms within category (p<.05).Source: Kaiser/HRET Survey of Employer-Sponsored Health Benefits,2011.
  • Distribution of Health Plan Enrollment for Covered Workers, by Plan Type, 1988-2011 1% 1% 1% 1%* Distribution is statistically different from the previous year shown (p<.05). No statistical tests were conducted for yearsprior to 1999. No statistical tests are conducted between 2005 and 2006 due to the addition of HDHP/SO as a new plan typein 2006.Note: Information was not obtained for POS plans in 1988. A portion of the change in plan type enrollment for 2005 is likelyattributable to incorporating more recent Census Bureau estimates of the number of state and local government workersand removing federal workers from the weights. See the Survey Design and Methods section from the 2005 Kaiser/HRETSurvey of Employer-Sponsored Health Benefits for additional information.Source: Kaiser/HRET Survey of Employer-Sponsored Health Benefits, 1999-2011; KPMG Survey of Employer-SponsoredHealth Benefits, 1993, 1996; The Health Insurance Association of America (HIAA), 1988.
  • Among Firms Offering Health Benefits, Percentage That Offer an HDHP/SO, by Firm Size, 2005-2011* Estimate is statistically different from estimate for previous year shown (p<.05).‡ The 2011 estimate includes 1.8% of all firms offering health benefits that offer bothan HDHP/HRA and an HSA-qualified HDHP. The comparable percentages forprevious years are: 2005 [0.3%], 2006 [0.4%], 2007 [0.2%], 2008 [0.3%], 2009[<0.1%], and 2010 [0.3%].Source: Kaiser/HRET Survey of Employer-Sponsored Health Benefits, 2005-2011.
  • Percentage of Covered Workers Enrolled in a Plan with a General Annual Deductible of $1,000 or More for Single Coverage, By Firm Size, 2006-2011* Estimate is statistically different from estimate for the previous year shown (p<.05).Note: These estimates include workers enrolled in HDHP/SO and other plan types. Because we do not collect information on the attributes ofconventional plans, to be conservative, we assumed that workers in conventional plans do not have a deductible of $1,000 or more. Becauseof the low enrollment in conventional plans, the impact of this assumption is minimal. Average general annual health plan deductibles forPPOs, POS plans, and HDHP/SOs are for in-network services.Source: Kaiser/HRET Survey of Employer-Sponsored Health Benefits, 2006-2011.
  • Percentage of Covered Workers Enrolled in a Plan with a General Annual Deductible of $2,000 or More for Single Coverage, By Firm Size, 2006-2011* Estimate is statistically different from estimate for the previous year shown (p<.05).Note: These estimates include workers enrolled in HDHP/SO and other plan types. Because we do not collect information on the attributes ofconventional plans, to be conservative, we assumed that workers in conventional plans do not have a deductible of $2,000 or more. Becauseof the low enrollment in conventional plans, the impact of this assumption is minimal.Source: Kaiser/HRET Survey of Employer-Sponsored Health Benefits, 2006-2011.
  • Percentage of All Firms Offering Health Benefits, 1999-2011*Estimate is statistically different from estimate for the previous year shown (p<.05).Note: Estimates presented in this exhibit are based on the sample of both firms that completed the entiresurvey and those that answered just one question about whether they offer health benefits. The percentage offirms offering health benefits is largely driven by small firms. The large increase in 2010 was primarily driven bya 12 percentage point increase in offering among firms with 3 to 9 workers. In 2011, 48% of firms with 3 to 9employees offer health benefits, a level more consistent with levels from recent years other than 2010. Theoverall 2011 offer rate is consistent with the long term trend, indicating that the high 2010 offer rate may be anaberration.Source: Kaiser/HRET Survey of Employer-Sponsored Health Benefits, 1999-2011.
  • Among All Large Firms (200 or More Workers) Offering Health Benefits to Active Workers, Percentage of Firms Offering Retiree Health Benefits, 1988-2011Note: Tests found no statistical difference from estimate for the previous year shown (p<.05). No statistical tests areconducted for years prior to 1999. Data have been edited to include the less than 1% of large firms who report “yes,but no retiree” responses in 2011. Historical numbers have been recalculated so that the results are comparable.Source: Kaiser/HRET Survey of Employer-Sponsored Health Benefits, 1999-2011; KPMG Survey of Employer-SponsoredHealth Benefits, 1991, 1993, 1995, 1998; The Health Insurance Association of America (HIAA), 1988.
  • Percentage of Covered Workers in Partially or Completely Self-Funded Plans, 1999-2011*Tests found no statistical difference from estimate for the previous year shown (p<.05). No statisticaltests are conducted for years prior to 1999.Source: Kaiser/HRET Survey of Employer-Sponsored Health Benefits, 1999-2011
  • of Co ve Percentage of Covered Workers Enrolled in Partially or re Completely Self-Insured Plans which Purchase Different Types d W of Stoploss Insurance, by Firm Size, 2011 or Pe ke rc rs en En ta rol Av ge le Pe er of d rc ag Co in en e ve a ta Pe re Se ge r d lf- of E W Fu Co m or nd ve pl ke ed re oy rs Pl All d ee En an Large W Cl rol th Firms or ai le at 1,00 ke 5,00 (200 m d Pu or or rs 5 0 0-4,9 200- 50-1 8 s in rc ALL in 7 More 23 85 8 Co More 6 999 2 5 99 a ha FIRM % % 89 st Work Pa % 0 Work % 8 1 0 Se se SIZE % % % at ers) rti * % Sers * lf- s 96 40 80 20 79 88 84 13 50 90 75 $7 all 30 $ w Fu St * * y 1, 5, 6, 3, 1 2 hi* Estimate is statistically different from estimate for all other firms not in the indicated category nd op or 81 21 71 82 9 0 ch(p<.05). ed lo Co 5* 0* 9* 4* 9, 8, St Pl ssSource: Kaiser/HRET Survey of Employer-Sponsored Health Benefits, 2011. m 6 2 op an In pl 0 8 lo th su
  • Percentage of Firms Offering Family Coverage Who Enrolled Adult Children up to 26 Years of Age as Dependents Because of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), by Firm Size, 2011* Estimate is statistically different from estimate for all other firms not in the indicated size (p<.05).Note: In total, an estimated 2.3 million adult children were enrolled in their parent’s employer sponsored health plan dueto the Affordable Care Act.Source: Kaiser/HRET Survey of Employer-Sponsored Health Benefits, 2011.
  • Percentage of Firms and Covered Workers Enrolled in Plans Grandfathered under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), by Firm Size, 2011*Estimate is statistically different between All Small Firmsand All Large Firms within category (p<.05).Source: Kaiser/HRET Survey of Employer-SponsoredHealth Benefits, 2011.
  • Among Covered Workers, Changes to Cost Sharing for Preventive Services Because of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), by Firm Size, 2011*Estimate is statistically different between All Small Firms and All Large Firms within category(p<.05).Source: Kaiser/HRET Survey of Employer-Sponsored Health Benefits, 2011.
  • Among Offering Firms with Fewer Than 50 Employees, Awareness and Utilization of the Small Employer Tax Credits Made Available in the Affordable Care Act (ACA), 2011Note: The ACA provides a temporary tax credit for small employers with fewer than 25 full-time equivalents that offer health insurance and have averageannual wages of less than $50,000. More information about the tax credit is available at: http://www.irs.gov/newsroom/article/0,,id=223666,00.html. Becauseour survey asks about the total number of employees in a firm and not full-time equivalents, we could not limit responses to firms only within the size rangeeligible for the credit. To ensure that we included employers that may have a number of part-time or temporary employees but could still qualify for the taxcredit, we directed questions to employers with fewer than 50 total employees. This approach allowed us to capture some employers with more than 25 totalemployees that would nonetheless be eligible for the tax credit, but it also means that some employers that are unlikely to be eligible for the tax credit wereasked these questions.§ Note: 87% of the firms who stated that they would not claim the credit in either year believed that they were noteligible, 10% believed that the credit was too small, and 3% said that claiming the credit was too much of a hassle.Source: Kaiser/HRET Survey of Employer-Sponsored Health Benefits, 2011.