Pisapia, J. (2009). The Strategic Leader. Charlotte: NC: IAP Agility of the Mind
<ul><li>Agility is the capability to switch from a strategic mindset -“Why and What” - to a tactical mindset -“how” - in a...
01/22/10 Pisapia, J. (2009) The Strategic Leader. The Strategic Thinking Protocol Core Competency Agility :  Basic premise...
<ul><li>Mindset  “ drives every aspect of our lives, from work to sports, from relationships to parenting.”  (Dweck, 2006)...
Pisapia, J. (2009). The Strategic Leader. Charlotte: NC: IAP Why are Mindsets  Powerful Determinants of Behavior
Pisapia, J. (2009). The Strategic Leader. Charlotte: NC: IAP
Pisapia, J. (2009). The Strategic Leader. Charlotte: NC: IAP
Test Your Mindset # 1 What do you believe about your intelligence? <ul><li>1. Your intelligence is something very basic th...
Test Your Mindset # 2  What do you believe about leadership?  <ul><li>Leadership is natural: leaders are mostly born, not ...
Pisapia, J. (2009). The Strategic Leader. Charlotte: NC: IAP Strategic Leaders change the atmosphere by bring a philosophy...
Pisapia, J. (2009). The Strategic Leader. Charlotte: NC: IAP So -------------- WHAT IS YOUR WORLDVIEW?
Habit 2 Implications of Worldviews Old Science  -  New Science <ul><li>Organizations tend to be: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Bui...
Habit 2 The Principles and Tactics Suggested by the New Science Pisapia, J. (2009). The Strategic Leader. Charlotte: NC: IAP
Habit 2 Worldview Complexity <ul><li>Complexity  is the state between order and chaos.  </li></ul>Pisapia, J. (2009). The ...
Pisapia, J. (2009). The Strategic Leader. Charlotte: NC: IAP Tactic Effect  Stability EOC Chaos Increase  Rate of Informat...
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Agility of the Mind

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  • Leadership is always situated within an environmental context and leaders must be trained to understand and address strategic themes emanating from that context. It requires mental agility. We are asking more workers to shift to self authoring minds and more leaders to move to transforming minds. The self authoring mind would create a direction – align and have the courage to hold steadfast toward that view. The transforming mind would be able to do all of that but would be able to step outside – evaluate and re-author Mental complexity can make a complex world more or less manageable (Keagan &amp; Kelley, p. 24 Cognitive development is progressive and sequential
  • This nested framework demonstrates how mental models that are aligned with the dominant paradigm. This alignment reinforces and sustains the paradigm. As educators conform to the requirements of the paradigm and mental models they develop mindsets (attitudes) about the value and effectiveness of the paradigm and the related mental models. The mindsets influence choice of behavioral strategies; that is, their attitudes toward the paradigm and mental models help them to devise strategies for how to do their work. As they implement their strategies, observable behavior is manifested. Successful behaviors are rewarded, which, in turn, reinforces the mindsets, mental models, and the paradigm. This interconnectedness and reciprocal reinforcement is unavoidable and powerful. Mental Models The concept of mental models was first proposed by Craik (1943). He said, “…the mind constructs ‘small-scale models’ of reality that it uses to anticipate events, to reason, and to underlie explanation” (cited in Johnson-Laird, Girotto, &amp; Legrenzi, 1998, Introduction, para. 1). Johnson-Laird (1983) is one of the foremost authorities of mental model theory. He believed that people construct cognitive representations of what they learn and what they think they know. He called these representations “mental models.” Senge (1990) described mental models as “…deeply ingrained assumptions, generalizations, or even pictures or images that influence how we understand the world and how we take action” (p. 8).
  • The right-hand drawing in the top row, when viewed alone, has equal chances of being perceived as a man or a woman. When test subjects are shown the entire series of drawings one by one, their perception of this intermediate drawing is biased according to which end of the series they started from. Test subjects who start by viewing a picture that is clearly a man are biased in favor of continuing to see a man long after an &amp;quot;objective observer&amp;quot; (for example, an observer who has seen only a single picture) recognizes that the man is now a woman. Similarly, test subjects who start at the woman end of the series are biased in favor of continuing to see a woman. Once an observer has formed an image--that is, once he or she has developed a mind-set or expectation concerning the phenomenon being observed--this conditions future perceptions of that phenomenon
  • illustrates this principle by showing part of a longer series of progressively modified drawings that change almost imperceptibly from a man into a woman. 23 The right-hand drawing in the top row, when viewed alone, has equal chances of being perceived as a man or a woman. When test subjects are shown the entire series of drawings one by one, their perception of this intermediate drawing is biased according to which end of the series they started from. Test subjects who start by viewing a picture that is clearly a man are biased in favor of continuing to see a man long after an &amp;quot;objective observer&amp;quot; (for example, an observer who has seen only a single picture) recognizes that the man is now a woman. Similarly, test subjects who start at the woman end of the series are biased in favor of continuing to see a woman. Once an observer has formed an image--that is, once he or she has developed a mind-set or expectation concerning the phenomenon being observed--this conditions future perceptions of that phenomenon
  • Statements 1 and 2 reflect closed-mindset thinking. Statements 3 and 4 indicate an open mindset. Where do you fall on the spectrum? You can fall somewhere in the middle, but most people lean in one direction. You also have beliefs about your other abilities. Try substituting artistic talent, sports acumen or a particular business skill for intelligence.
  • Agility of the Mind

    1. 1. Pisapia, J. (2009). The Strategic Leader. Charlotte: NC: IAP Agility of the Mind
    2. 2. <ul><li>Agility is the capability to switch from a strategic mindset -“Why and What” - to a tactical mindset -“how” - in a rapid and iterative processes. It: </li></ul><ul><li>Enables leaders to understand the prevailing worldviews driving their context, and helps them identify and use design tactics that work under postmodern condition </li></ul>Pisapia, J. (2009). The Strategic Leader. Charlotte: NC: IAP
    3. 3. 01/22/10 Pisapia, J. (2009) The Strategic Leader. The Strategic Thinking Protocol Core Competency Agility : Basic premises: <ul><li>Agility of the mind is the core competency that drives the Strategic Thinking protocol. </li></ul>AGILITY Statement of Intent A NT ICIPATING ARTICULATIN G The Takeaway - A shared statement of intent forms a psychological contract with followers and guides the organization’s actions.
    4. 4. <ul><li>Mindset “ drives every aspect of our lives, from work to sports, from relationships to parenting.” (Dweck, 2006). It affects : </li></ul><ul><li>What we pay attention to (and don’t) </li></ul><ul><li>What we retrieve from memory </li></ul><ul><li>The way you process relevant information </li></ul><ul><li>Decision Making </li></ul><ul><li>Self-efficacy </li></ul><ul><li>Openness to learning </li></ul><ul><li>Responses to authority/leader figures </li></ul>Habit 2 - Agility The Importance of Mindset Pisapia, J. (2009). The Strategic Leader. Charlotte: NC: IAP
    5. 5. Pisapia, J. (2009). The Strategic Leader. Charlotte: NC: IAP Why are Mindsets Powerful Determinants of Behavior
    6. 6. Pisapia, J. (2009). The Strategic Leader. Charlotte: NC: IAP
    7. 7. Pisapia, J. (2009). The Strategic Leader. Charlotte: NC: IAP
    8. 8. Test Your Mindset # 1 What do you believe about your intelligence? <ul><li>1. Your intelligence is something very basic that cannot change much. </li></ul><ul><li>2. You can learn new things, but you can’t really change how intelligent you are. </li></ul><ul><li>3. No matter how intelligent you are, you can always improve. </li></ul><ul><li>4. You can substantially change how intelligent you are. </li></ul>Pisapia, J. (2009). The Strategic Leader. Charlotte: NC: IAP
    9. 9. Test Your Mindset # 2 What do you believe about leadership? <ul><li>Leadership is natural: leaders are mostly born, not made. So once a leader, always a leader. </li></ul><ul><li>Leadership involves charisma, confidence, strength, and exercising power over others. </li></ul><ul><li>Leadership is a function of holding a leadership position/role. </li></ul><ul><li>To be a better leader, you should identify and strengthen your leadership weaknesses. </li></ul>Pisapia, J. (2009). The Strategic Leader. Charlotte: NC: IAP
    10. 10. Pisapia, J. (2009). The Strategic Leader. Charlotte: NC: IAP Strategic Leaders change the atmosphere by bring a philosophy, a system, and way of doing things that that leads to sustained not random success.
    11. 11. Pisapia, J. (2009). The Strategic Leader. Charlotte: NC: IAP So -------------- WHAT IS YOUR WORLDVIEW?
    12. 12. Habit 2 Implications of Worldviews Old Science - New Science <ul><li>Organizations tend to be: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Built on predictability and Rationality. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Rigid and conforming </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>In a steady state. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Have problems which are amenable to solution. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Independent of environment </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Change must be managed not led. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Leaders need to predict, direct, manage and control change in their organizations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Develop and follow detailed maps. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Focus on clarity of purpose, command structures, and control processes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Command and control structures are used to create predictability of results. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Organizations tend to be: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Built on unpredictability and complexity. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>In disarray and disorder. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>In a state of becoming </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Have some problems which not amenable to solution in current form, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Interdependent with environment </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Change must be led, not managed. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Leaders need to discover the route and the destination through a journey. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Focus on becoming more adaptable in order to survive. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Maintain a constancy of purpose. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Begin with a small working system, have multiple goals, strive to make good enough choices, and grow by chunking. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Turn whatever happens to your advantage. </li></ul></ul>Pisapia, J. (2009). The Strategic Leader. Charlotte: NC: IAP
    13. 13. Habit 2 The Principles and Tactics Suggested by the New Science Pisapia, J. (2009). The Strategic Leader. Charlotte: NC: IAP
    14. 14. Habit 2 Worldview Complexity <ul><li>Complexity is the state between order and chaos. </li></ul>Pisapia, J. (2009). The Strategic Leader. Charlotte: NC: IAP When strategic leaders operate under conditions of complexity, their goal should be to manage at the edge of chaos. Stability Complexity Chaos
    15. 15. Pisapia, J. (2009). The Strategic Leader. Charlotte: NC: IAP Tactic Effect Stability EOC Chaos Increase Rate of Information Flow Low Optimum High Increase Degree of Diversity Low Optimum High Increase Level of Anxiety Low Optimum High I ncrease Degree of Power Differentials High Optimum Low
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