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Linked Sensor Data 101 (FIS2011)
 

Linked Sensor Data 101 (FIS2011)

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  • Addingsemanticsallowsthesearch and exploration of sensor data withoutany prior knowledge of the data sourceUsingtheprinciples of Linked Data facilitatestheintegration of stream data totheincreasingnumber of Linked Data collections
  • - A core ontological model that can be used to describe sensor data streams, including the metadata about the sensor data sources and their observations. We take into account here the ontology developed for this purpose in the context of the W3C Semantic Sensor Network Incubator Group, which can be considered the current standard to be followed. - A set of additional domain ontologies in the area in which sensors are applied and for which they generate measurements (e.g., if we deal with environmental sensors related to water, then ontologies about different aspects of water will be needed). These ontologies must be aligned with the previous core ontology.Guidelines for the generation of identifiers (in the form of URIs, since this is one of the key ingredients of Linked Data) for sensors, their observations and the features of interest that they observe.Supporting Sensor Web programming interfaces (APIs) that make use of the HTTP protocol for serving the corresponding data whenever the previous URIs are dereferenced. Query processing engines that support extended versions of SPARQL (the query language used for Linked Data) and handle some of the most characteristic aspects of data streams, such as time and/or tuple windows. The management of spatio-temporal extensions of this query language may be also useful in this context.
  • - A core ontological model that can be used to describe sensor data streams, including the metadata about the sensor data sources and their observations. We take into account here the ontology developed for this purpose in the context of the W3C Semantic Sensor Network Incubator Group, which can be considered the current standard to be followed. - A set of additional domain ontologies in the area in which sensors are applied and for which they generate measurements (e.g., if we deal with environmental sensors related to water, then ontologies about different aspects of water will be needed). These ontologies must be aligned with the previous core ontology.Guidelines for the generation of identifiers (in the form of URIs, since this is one of the key ingredients of Linked Data) for sensors, their observations and the features of interest that they observe.Supporting Sensor Web programming interfaces (APIs) that make use of the HTTP protocol for serving the corresponding data whenever the previous URIs are dereferenced. Query processing engines that support extended versions of SPARQL (the query language used for Linked Data) and handle some of the most characteristic aspects of data streams, such as time and/or tuple windows. The management of spatio-temporal extensions of this query language may be also useful in this context.
  • - A core ontological model that can be used to describe sensor data streams, including the metadata about the sensor data sources and their observations. We take into account here the ontology developed for this purpose in the context of the W3C Semantic Sensor Network Incubator Group, which can be considered the current standard to be followed. - A set of additional domain ontologies in the area in which sensors are applied and for which they generate measurements (e.g., if we deal with environmental sensors related to water, then ontologies about different aspects of water will be needed). These ontologies must be aligned with the previous core ontology.Guidelines for the generation of identifiers (in the form of URIs, since this is one of the key ingredients of Linked Data) for sensors, their observations and the features of interest that they observe.Supporting Sensor Web programming interfaces (APIs) that make use of the HTTP protocol for serving the corresponding data whenever the previous URIs are dereferenced. Query processing engines that support extended versions of SPARQL (the query language used for Linked Data) and handle some of the most characteristic aspects of data streams, such as time and/or tuple windows. The management of spatio-temporal extensions of this query language may be also useful in this context.
  • The where clasue for both SPARQL extensions is the same
  • - A core ontological model that can be used to describe sensor data streams, including the metadata about the sensor data sources and their observations. We take into account here the ontology developed for this purpose in the context of the W3C Semantic Sensor Network Incubator Group, which can be considered the current standard to be followed. - A set of additional domain ontologies in the area in which sensors are applied and for which they generate measurements (e.g., if we deal with environmental sensors related to water, then ontologies about different aspects of water will be needed). These ontologies must be aligned with the previous core ontology.Guidelines for the generation of identifiers (in the form of URIs, since this is one of the key ingredients of Linked Data) for sensors, their observations and the features of interest that they observe.Supporting Sensor Web programming interfaces (APIs) that make use of the HTTP protocol for serving the corresponding data whenever the previous URIs are dereferenced. Query processing engines that support extended versions of SPARQL (the query language used for Linked Data) and handle some of the most characteristic aspects of data streams, such as time and/or tuple windows. The management of spatio-temporal extensions of this query language may be also useful in this context.

Linked Sensor Data 101 (FIS2011) Linked Sensor Data 101 (FIS2011) Presentation Transcript