Week2

647 views
613 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
647
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
4
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
3
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Week2

  1. 1. The Economies of Cities and Regions (TEOCAR) Co-ordinator Dr Jennifer Day Lecturer in Urban Planning Faculty of Architecture Building and Planning The University of Melbourne Office: 509 Architecture Building Phone: 8344 8743 Email: jday@unimelb.edu.au Office hours: Tuesdays 10am-noon Tutor Juan Blanco Email: jpblancomoya@gmail.com
  2. 2. <ul><li>Position Papers </li></ul><ul><li>Individually in pairs or using your reading groups of no fewer than three and no more than four , Students will prepare two position papers per semester (position Paper 1 and Position Paper 2; PP1 and PP2). </li></ul><ul><li>Papers are on a topic of your own choice . You can draw on the sample discussion questions provided in the Tute Guide, examine other issues raised in the tute sessions, or may draw a topic from current events, personal experience, work experience, or other sources </li></ul><ul><li>*The Age and The Australian are good sources of information on relevant current events. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The papers should examine an issue related to urban economics or economic development. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>It does not need to be a topic directly addressed in the subject. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The papers can take the form of a critical analysis, an opinion piece, or essay. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>You may choose any format. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Papers SHOULD NOT simply provide a summary of a topic or issue. You will not be graded on your opinion per se , but on how well you substantiate that opinion. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Examples include: newspaper op-ed format, letter to a senator or Member of Parliament, book review, or traditional essay/critical analysis. You may wish to take a stand on an issue such as inclusionary zoning in Melbourne, historic preservation and its application, urban infrastructure provided under stimulus spending, or any number of topics related to urban planning and urban economic development. </li></ul>
  3. 3. <ul><li>Position Papers </li></ul><ul><li>Regardless of the format you choose, your position papers should contain the following sections (it’s ok if you vary the titles and/or order of these sections, but you need to include them all): </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Introduction and thesis statement </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Background information sufficient for the reader to understand the issue </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2-5 arguments in support of thesis </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Potential counterarguments and refutations of counterarguments. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Conclusion </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Each paper should cite at least twenty references per student on the team; half of these references should NOT be part of the required readings for the subject. </li></ul><ul><li>* References can include materials from peer-reviewed journals, books, industry and non-profit publications, newspapers and periodicals, and media websites, as appropriate. If you use web sources, carefully consider their relevance and reliability. </li></ul><ul><li>Each position paper should be roughly 2000 words per student. Also consider that: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Teams composition will not change from PP1 to PP2 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The two position papers should be on different topics. The topics can be related, but not with significant source overlap </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Each team should submit one copy of their Position Paper for marking, with a cover sheet containing all team members’ names. </li></ul></ul>
  4. 4. Papers will be evaluated as follows: [20%] Thesis or Statement of Purpose. If your papers take a stand on an issue, then this stance should be clearly articulated. If your papers provide a critical analysis of a literature, then this should be clearly stated. [20%] Background. A brief overview of the issue is presented so that everyone reading the paper can understand. [20%] Sources. The main argument is positioned in the literature and framed by credible sources. Sources can be from media (newspapers, online aggregation sites, etc.), books, or peer-reviewed journals. Sources are appropriately cited during the presentation. [20%] Analysis. The main argument is positioned in the literature, logical, and potential refuting arguments are examined, if applicable. The writing shows in-depth exploration of the topic, and an attempt to acknowledge the major debates and competing positions surrounding an issue. [20%] Writing quality is consistent with English-language grammar rules. Ideas are organized logically.
  5. 5. <ul><li>Presentations </li></ul><ul><li>Each reading group , pair or individual will prepare a 10-minute presentation to the class on a topic drawn from its second Position Paper. Presentations will be given during the lecture period and continue in the tute session. </li></ul><ul><li>Students should prepare Powerpoint (or other presentation software) and give a presentation based on the following guidelines: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>[20%] Thesis. The presentation presents a topic with a main argument or thesis. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>[20%] Background. A brief overview of the issue is presented so that everyone watching the presentation can understand. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>[20%] Sources. The main argument is positioned in the literature and framed by credible sources. Sources can be from media (newspapers, online aggregation sites, etc.) peer-reviewed journals, or books. Sources are appropriately cited during the presentation. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>[20%] Analysis. The main argument is positioned in the literature, logical, and potential refuting arguments are examined. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>[20%] Presentation quality. The presentation is rehearsed, with visually-engaging images and/or text slides. </li></ul></ul>
  6. 6. Assessment Position Paper 1 (30%) Position Paper 2 (40%) Presentation of PP1 or PP2 (20%) Class Participation (10%)
  7. 8. Attendance and Submissions
  8. 9. Reading Groups
  9. 10. Studios PART 1. INTRODUCTION; THEORIES OF PRODUCTION IN CITIES This module provides a foundation in the classic theories of urban economic production, and the evolution of these theories into more-contemporary ideas. Theories of agglomeration and their spatial outcomes are examined. PART 2. CHANGE IN ECONOMIC SECTORS This module examines the departures from classic urban production theories seen in modern cities, and the forces driving these changes. The consequences of these changes in urban development and planning are also discussed. PART 3. THE ROLE OF INFRASTRUCTURE This module introduces the infrastructure that supports urban economic activity. Planning, financing, and maintaining infrastructure are also addressed. PART 4. LAND DEVELOPMENT This segment addresses the development of urban infrastructure, property, and other drivers of the urban economy. PART 5. THE INFORMAL SECTOR This segment examines the role of informal economic sectors in urban economies. Case studies of are examined in cities in both developed and developing countries.
  10. 11. <ul><li>Week 2 Discussion of readings </li></ul><ul><li>INSTRUCTIONS </li></ul><ul><li>Discuss in your reading group the following question, related with this week’s required readings, additional recommended readings, lectures and your own interests. Designate one people in charge of taking notes of the outcomes of the exercise. </li></ul><ul><li>Questions </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The early firm-location theories were largely developed in the context of North American cities. What special considerations, if any, does the Australian context provide? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What considerations are missing from the original theories of firm location? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What are some reasons why agglomeration happens? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What are the types of firm agglomerations in Melbourne? Regional Victoria? How have these changed over time? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Do you see a relationship between macroeconomic policies and urban economic development planning? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How does the public sector influence economic planning in cities? How much power does the public sector have? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What controls over public policy does Hoover identify? Can you think of any considerations that are unique to the Australian city? What’s changed since he wrote this article? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What does he mean by “transfer costs?” </li></ul></ul>

×