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Shelley bennett
Shelley bennett
Shelley bennett
Shelley bennett
Shelley bennett
Shelley bennett
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Shelley bennett

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  • 1. The impact of continued expansion of Melbourne’s Urban Growth Boundary on future food security. Shelley Bennett (133623)
  • 2. Thesis statement: Urban sprawl, enabled by the expansion of the urban growth boundary (UGB) is resulting in a loss of agricultural land, impacting on future food security in Melbourne, Australia. Background Info: – Links between land use planning and food security – Food related economic activity in Victoria – Food security – Melbourne’s UGB
  • 3. Rural Impacts – Reduces certainty for farmers to re-invest in their land and plan for the future (Buxton, 2006) – Encourages land speculation – Increased land rates and values (Egan, 2009) What can Planning do? – Enforce permanent UGB’s to ensure certainty and reinstate shorter supply chains Eg. Oregon, USA (Burke, 2008)
  • 4. Urban Impacts – Increased food prices (Larsen, 2008) – Loss of local industry, employment and access to locally produced food (Burns, 2009) – Casey-Cardinia growth area What can Planning do? – Protect prime agricultural land from urban development to maintain a local supply (Burns, 2009)
  • 5. The other side: State Government and affordable housing (Dowling, 2010) – Short-sighted approach – Does not consider vulnerability to changes in utility, fuel and food costs (Burns, 2009) – Increasing density along transport corridors would save society $300 million per 1,000 housing units (City of Melbourne, 2009)
  • 6. Conclusions – Challenge: next doubling of food production to come from increased productivity on the same land base – Research and technology development is essential – Productive agricultrual land should be treated as a strategic resource, and not converted into housing. – Food is now a core agenda item, and Melbourne needs to stop increasing the UGB in order to achieve future food security.

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