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Functional Skills In Apprenticeships
Functional Skills In Apprenticeships
Functional Skills In Apprenticeships
Functional Skills In Apprenticeships
Functional Skills In Apprenticeships
Functional Skills In Apprenticeships
Functional Skills In Apprenticeships
Functional Skills In Apprenticeships
Functional Skills In Apprenticeships
Functional Skills In Apprenticeships
Functional Skills In Apprenticeships
Functional Skills In Apprenticeships
Functional Skills In Apprenticeships
Functional Skills In Apprenticeships
Functional Skills In Apprenticeships
Functional Skills In Apprenticeships
Functional Skills In Apprenticeships
Functional Skills In Apprenticeships
Functional Skills In Apprenticeships
Functional Skills In Apprenticeships
Functional Skills In Apprenticeships
Functional Skills In Apprenticeships
Functional Skills In Apprenticeships
Functional Skills In Apprenticeships
Functional Skills In Apprenticeships
Functional Skills In Apprenticeships
Functional Skills In Apprenticeships
Functional Skills In Apprenticeships
Functional Skills In Apprenticeships
Functional Skills In Apprenticeships
Functional Skills In Apprenticeships
Functional Skills In Apprenticeships
Functional Skills In Apprenticeships
Functional Skills In Apprenticeships
Functional Skills In Apprenticeships
Functional Skills In Apprenticeships
Functional Skills In Apprenticeships
Functional Skills In Apprenticeships
Functional Skills In Apprenticeships
Functional Skills In Apprenticeships
Functional Skills In Apprenticeships
Functional Skills In Apprenticeships
Functional Skills In Apprenticeships
Functional Skills In Apprenticeships
Functional Skills In Apprenticeships
Functional Skills In Apprenticeships
Functional Skills In Apprenticeships
Functional Skills In Apprenticeships
Functional Skills In Apprenticeships
Functional Skills In Apprenticeships
Functional Skills In Apprenticeships
Functional Skills In Apprenticeships
Functional Skills In Apprenticeships
Functional Skills In Apprenticeships
Functional Skills In Apprenticeships
Functional Skills In Apprenticeships
Functional Skills In Apprenticeships
Functional Skills In Apprenticeships
Functional Skills In Apprenticeships
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Functional Skills In Apprenticeships

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Draft 6 - a presentation to promote discussion about the place of Functional Skills in Apprenticeships …

Draft 6 - a presentation to promote discussion about the place of Functional Skills in Apprenticeships

now updated to include SASE -

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  • 1. Functional Skills in Apprenticeships John Pallister www.JohnPallister.net September 2009 (updated Jan 2010)
  • 2. Aim: <ul><li>To provide links to current information about the structure and delivery of Apprenticeships; </li></ul><ul><li>To promote discussion about how Functional Skills might be developed though Apprenticeships. </li></ul>
  • 3. Skills for Growth: a national strategy for economic growth and individual prosperity (November 2009) <ul><li>“ Skills are a key part of our plan for economic recovery, and an urgent challenge . This country’s future can only be built by people who have the skills demanded by modern work in a globalised economy. Skilled people are more productive and more innovative. Skills give individuals wider options; they climb higher, earn more and get more out of work. And skilled people are the foundation of successful businesses.” </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.bis.gov.uk/policies/skills-for-growth </li></ul>
  • 4. Skills for Growth: rising to the challenge? <ul><li>“ Creating a modern technician class through more advanced apprenticeships </li></ul><ul><li>Investing in skills in the sectors on which future growth and jobs depend </li></ul><ul><li>Empowering individuals through skills accounts giving people ‘consumer choice’ and better information about courses </li></ul><ul><li>The introduction of light touch monitoring arrangements for our best providers </li></ul><ul><li>Simplifying the skills landscape, working with UKCES to implement their recommendation to reduce the number of separately publicly funded agencies by over 30 in the next three years” </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.bis.gov.uk/policies/skills-for-growth </li></ul>
  • 5. Skills for Growth: an ambition <ul><li>“ for three quarters of the population to go to university or get an advanced technical qualification by the age of 30” </li></ul><ul><li>http://nds.coi.gov.uk/clientmicrosite/Content/Detail.aspx?ClientId=431&amp;NewsAreaId=2&amp;ReleaseID=408485&amp;SubjectId=36 </li></ul>
  • 6. expanding apprenticeships <ul><li>&amp;quot;Young people are being given more and better options than ever before post-16 and an expanded apprenticeships programme will be one of the key choices offered to them, alongside A levels and our new Diplomas. We want to increase the number of 16-18 apprenticeships available by 2013 and to ensure that from then every qualified school leaver is entitled to an apprenticeship place.” http://www.dius.gov.uk/news_and_speeches/press_releases/apprenticeships_legislation </li></ul>
  • 7. A pathway; a route or a suite that 20% of learners will follow (2020). <ul><li>&amp;quot;We anticipate that around one in five of all young people will be undertaking an apprenticeship in the next decade. In the coming years, we want apprenticeships to be seen alongside university as a great option for young people who want the best jobs, the best careers and the best chance to get on - and we will only do this if they have the confidence of both learners and employees.&amp;quot; http://www.dius.gov.uk/news_and_speeches/press_releases/apprenticeships_legislation </li></ul>
  • 8. “ one of the four national suites of provision at 14–19” <ul><ul><li>Foundation Learning; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Diplomas; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>GCSEs and A-levels; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Apprenticeships. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.excellencegateway.org.uk/FLT Sept 2009 </li></ul></ul>
  • 9. http://www.dcsf.gov.uk/14-19/documents/qualifications_map.JPG
  • 10. http://image.guardian.co.uk/sys-files/Education/documents/2009/12/16/Illustration.pdf
  • 11. Apprenticeships: a growth area <ul><li>“ The Government is committed to significant growth in Apprenticeships for young people and adults, and at a time of economic downturn it is vital that we continue to invest in people and their skills. In order to achieve this growth we have increased funding for Apprentices by almost a quarter since 2007/08 to over £1 billion in 2009/10 . </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk/About-Us/Press-and-Media/~/media/Documents/Press%20Releases/Press%20release%20Apps%20Pathfinder%20final%20080709.ashx </li></ul>
  • 12. A National Need <ul><ul><li>&amp;quot;Higher level skills have never been more important to our growth. The strategy marks a radical shift in our skills priorities. It shows how we‘’s make sure we&apos;ve got the skills to power the new industries and jobs of the future. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ We need engineers to lay the cables to expand access to high-speed internet, skilled people to build the electric vehicles of the future, and technicians to develop the medicines that will save lives. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ The goal of this strategy is a skills system defined not simply by targets based on achieved qualifications, but by ‘real world’ outcomes. Relevant, quality skills, with real market value.” </li></ul></ul><ul><li>http://nds.coi.gov.uk/clientmicrosite/Content/Detail.aspx?ClientId=431&amp;NewsAreaId=2&amp;ReleaseID=408485&amp;SubjectId=36 </li></ul>
  • 13. Range of Apprenticeships <ul><li>“ There are over 180 Apprenticeships available across more than 80 industry sectors. </li></ul><ul><li>Frameworks are developed by the relevant sector body and incorporate the set criteria, outcomes and good practice that are approved by the Skills for Business Apprenticeships Approval group” http://www.lsc.gov.uk/providers/Data/datadictionary/businessdefinitions/Apprenticeships.htm </li></ul>
  • 14. http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk/About-Us/~/media/Documents/NAS%20-%20Apprenticeships%20-%20Key%20Facts%20-%20Aug09.ashx
  • 15. What ‘Level’ are Apprenticeships? <ul><li>“ three levels of Apprenticeship available for those aged 16 and over : </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Level 2 - Apprenticeships (equivalent to five good GCSE passes) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Level 3 - Advanced Apprenticeships (equivalent to two A-level passes) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Level 4 - Higher Apprenticeships (Level 4/Foundation degree).” </li></ul></ul><ul><li>http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk/Be-An-Apprentice/Levels-of-Apprenticeships.aspx </li></ul>
  • 16. And - Young apprenticeships <ul><li>“ From September 2009 a sixth cohort of around 9,000 places will be available with the expansion of YA with Diplomas pilots. Plans for the Young Apprenticeship programme are following a course of mainstreaming and convergence with the wider 14-19 curriculum offer. “ – another Pathway? </li></ul><ul><li>“ a new route at key stage 4. The programme allows motivated and able pupils to study for vocational qualifications, not just in the classroom, but also in college, with training providers and in the workplace. “ </li></ul><ul><li>“ Pupils are based in school, and follow the core National Curriculum subjects - but for two days a week (or equivalent) they also work towards nationally recognised vocational qualifications delivered by their local YA Partnership. “ </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.dcsf.gov.uk/14-19/index.cfm?sid=3&amp;pid=342&amp;lid=321&amp;ctype=Text&amp;ptype=Single </li></ul>
  • 17. Young Apprenticeships <ul><li>“ The Young Apprenticeship programme allows pupils to gain industry-specific qualifications (such as NVQs) at Level 2. This gives them a platform from which they can progress to post–16 Apprenticeships.  The LSC funds the provision although this is a pilot programme and agreed on a year by year basis.” </li></ul><ul><li>A 6th cohort of 9,000 Young Apprenticeships starts in September 2009. </li></ul>
  • 18. Pre 16 and Post 16 Apprenticeships <ul><li>(Young Apprenticeships) – “As this is a pilot pre-16 education model it is not promoted as part of the drive for post-16 Apprenticeships. ” </li></ul><ul><li>“ Our policy stance is that although young Apprenticeships fall within the Apprenticeship brand/family, hence the inclusion with the Apprenticeship awards, they are not official Apprenticeships.  The National Apprenticeship Service would therefore be unlikely to run any kind of national promotion of the young Apprenticeship programme.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ Sector Skills Councils may promote these as part of their work with schools, and we do encourage local partnerships to work with schools, but our policy is not one of wider marketing, as only limited places are available. ” email 10/11/2009 </li></ul>
  • 19. The ‘selling points’ for the learner: <ul><li>“ can take between one and four years to complete depending on the level of Apprenticeship, the apprentices’ ability and the industry sector. The minimum salary is £95 a week; however, many apprentices earn significantly more. </li></ul><ul><li>Key benefits: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>earn a salary </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>get paid holidays </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>receive training </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>gain qualifications </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>learn job-specific skills.” </li></ul></ul><ul><li>http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk/Be-An-Apprentice/What-are-Apprenticeships.aspx Sept 2009 </li></ul>
  • 20. Apprenticeships provide significant benefits <ul><li>with average earnings increasing by up to 22 per cent following the completion of a Level 3 (equivalent to A-level) apprenticeship compared with a Level 2 apprenticeship. As National Vocational Qualifications (NVQs) are an integral part of apprenticeships, the report suggests that “these results suggest an effective means of delivering NVQs”. http://www.ukces.org.uk/press-release/new-report-vocational-qualifications-can-boost-earnings Full Report at http://www.ukces.org.uk/upload/pdf/UKCES%20Full%20Report%2011.pdf </li></ul>
  • 21. Apprenticeships are: <ul><li>a practical alternative for young people who want to work, or who want to learn a trade; </li></ul><ul><li>A style of learning for learners who prefer hands-on, continuous assessment of competencies; </li></ul><ul><li>A popular option for learners. </li></ul>
  • 22. Apprenticeships: a partnership between you, your employer and your learning provider. <ul><li>Apprentice – …”You will be in a job and working towards your National Vocational Qualifications (NVQs) to gain your Apprenticeship. </li></ul><ul><li>Employer – “The business or the person that you work for. You will spend most of your time here gaining industry knowledge and experience. Your employer will pay your wage, so generally you will need to find a company that needs an apprentice and is happy to employ you before you start the programme. </li></ul><ul><li>Learning Provider – “The organisation that will train and assess you as you work towards your Apprenticeship qualification. You will either receive training in your workplace, at the training centre or at a local college. Your learning provider may be able to help you find a job, but not in every case. Whichever learning provider you choose, they will be in regular contact with you to ensure that things are running smoothly. </li></ul><ul><li>http://readingroom.lsc.gov.uk/Lsc/SouthWest/Gloucester,_Wiltshire___Swindon.pdf </li></ul>
  • 23. Not a qualification - but a form of vocational training that: <ul><li>“ enable learners to gain skills necessary to succeed in their chosen career and earn money at the same time.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ involve a combination of on and off the job training - apprentices work alongside experienced staff to gain job-specific skills and receive training. “ </li></ul><ul><li>is a wrapper or “a ‘ framework’ that contains separately certified elements” </li></ul>http://www.ofqual.gov.uk/2368.aspx
  • 24. An apprenticeship consists of: <ul><li>12. “ a competence element and a knowledge element which, for the majority of existing Apprenticeship frameworks, have had separate ‘competence’ and ‘knowledge’ qualifications. </li></ul><ul><li>Whilst historically these were known as NVQs and technical certificates , framework developers are not confined to these qualifications. </li></ul><ul><li>the QCF has brought increased opportunity for combining units from qualifications which were previously separate. </li></ul><ul><li>The SASE allows for the elements to be combined in a single integrated qualification should SSCs and employers want this. </li></ul><ul><li>The SASE defines the competence element as the practical competencies required for a specific occupation or job role. </li></ul><ul><li>The knowledge element is defined as the technical skills and theory specifically relating to the occupation or job role, together with the knowledge and understanding of the industry and its market.” </li></ul><ul><li>Page 5 Guidance BIS-URN09-1459-Guide-AccWEB </li></ul>
  • 25. Not a qualification, but: <ul><li>The work based learning qualification will be in the NQF/QCF frameworks </li></ul><ul><li>The Key/Functional Skills qualification will be part of the NQF/QCF frameworks </li></ul>
  • 26. Not a qualification – but includes, and, sits alongside qualifications http://www.ofqual.gov.uk/2368.aspx
  • 27. The National Apprenticeship Service (NAS): <ul><li>“ will become the main organisation responsible for the successful delivery of Apprenticeship provision with a remit to oversee an ‘end to end’ responsibility for Apprenticeship delivery. It will be launched in April 2009. “ </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.dius.gov.uk/~/media/publications/0/005633_SASE_consultation_doc [twelve-week public consultation finishing on 8 October] </li></ul>
  • 28. Who sets up a ‘framework’? <ul><li>“ Apprenticeship framework must only be issued by the Issuing Authority designated by the Secretary of State to issue the framework. The framework must specify the skill, trade or occupation to which it relates. “ </li></ul><ul><li>“ frameworks must comply with the Specification of Apprenticeship Standards for England ( SASE ) </li></ul><ul><li>Page 3 Guidance BIS-URN09-1459-Guide-AccWEB </li></ul>
  • 29. Who Develops the ‘framework’? <ul><li>9. “ The Issuing Authority will work with employers in the sector and other relevant partners such as Standard Setting Bodies ( SSBs ) to develop Apprenticeship frameworks and to support Apprenticeship growth. </li></ul><ul><li>“ Issuing Authorities will: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Issue frameworks which comply with the SASE and will maintain their currency; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Notify the Chief Executive of Skills Funding of the issue or withdrawal of a framework and any changes to a framework; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Promote framework standards for the sector which go beyond the minimum requirements of the SASE; and </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Promote coherence in the range of Apprenticeship frameworks within their sector </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Page 3 Guidance BIS-URN09-1459-Guide-AccWEB </li></ul>
  • 30. who says what is in the ‘framework’? <ul><li>The SASE: </li></ul><ul><li>“ sets out the minimum requirements to be included in an Apprenticeship framework. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>(A statutory requirement of the Apprenticeships, Skills, Children and Learning (ASCL) Act.) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>first version of the SASE issued on a non-statutory basis for information. (Dec 2009) </li></ul><ul><li>final version of the SASE will be available from October 2010 and will take effect from 6th April 2011.” </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.dius.gov.uk/consultations/~/media/publications/S/SASE-Specification </li></ul>
  • 31. SASE replacing a ‘blueprint’ <ul><li>“ will replace the existing non-statutory ‘Blueprint’ for Apprenticeships and is in response to the commitments set out in World Class Apprenticeships, published in January 2008. “ </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.dius.gov.uk/~/media/publications/0/005633_SASE_consultation_doc [twelve-week public consultation finishing on 8 October </li></ul>
  • 32. What are the Functional Skills requirements in the SASE
  • 33. 6. The requirements must, as a minimum, include: <ul><li>.. </li></ul><ul><li>.. </li></ul><ul><li>c. “ The Functional Skills qualifications which an apprentice must obtain (and exemptions which may be allowed until 2016 for those with equivalent key skills qualifications or approved proxy qualifications achieved before September 2012); “ </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.dius.gov.uk/consultations/~/media/publications/S/SASE-Specification </li></ul>
  • 34. Functional Maths and English <ul><li>17. .. Functional Skills qualifications in English, mathematics and ICT will be available from September 2010 and will replace key skills in all Apprenticeship frameworks by that date. </li></ul><ul><li>From September 2010 Level 2 Apprenticeship frameworks will require the apprentice to gain Functional Skills qualifications in mathematics and English at a minimum of Level 1. </li></ul><ul><li>However, the Issuing Authority, in consultation with employers in the sector and relevant partners, should be proactive in considering the scope to go beyond this minimum and to set the threshold at Level 2. </li></ul><ul><li>Apprenticeship frameworks at Level 3 and above must require apprentices to gain Functional Skills qualifications in mathematics and English at Level 2. </li></ul>BIS-URN09-1459-Guide-AccWEB
  • 35. Functional ICT <ul><li>18. “The Issuing Authority, in consultation with employers in the sector and other relevant partners, should determine whether Information and Communications Technology (ICT) is directly relevant to effective performance in either the particular occupation or the sector. </li></ul><ul><li>Where ICT is directly relevant either to the occupation or to the sector, the Apprenticeship framework must specify that the apprentice is to attain a Functional Skills qualification in ICT at a minimum of Level 1 for a Level 2 Apprenticeship, or at Level 2 for an Advanced or Higher Apprenticeship. </li></ul><ul><li>Where ICT is not directly relevant to the occupation and sector, there is no minimum requirement. However, the Issuing Authority is encouraged to consider adding ICT to their frameworks in recognition of the increasing importance of ICT as a transferable employability skill.” </li></ul><ul><li>BIS-URN09-1459-Guide-AccWEB </li></ul>
  • 36. Functional Skills: Progression <ul><li>19. “To promote progression, where an individual has achieved Functional Skills qualifications at Level 1 in either mathematics, English or ICT (if the framework requires this) or has the relevant key skill/proxy qualification prior to starting a Level 2 Apprenticeship, the employer may allow the individual to study for a Functional Skills qualification at Level 2 as part of the Apprenticeship framework. </li></ul><ul><li>Under current funding arrangements young people up to age 19 have an entitlement to support for a course of study until they have gained Functional Skills qualifications at Level 2 in English, mathematics and ICT. </li></ul><ul><li>The intention is that from 2013 this will become a legal entitlement . Adults aged and over may also be funded to attain Functional Skills qualifications at Level 2. The Issuing Authority must actively encourage employers to allow the individual (particularly young people up to age 19) to progress to Functional Skills at Level 2 as part of the Apprenticeship framework. </li></ul>BIS-URN09-1459-Guide-AccWEB
  • 37. Functional Skills: in the long term <ul><li>20. “Our aim is that, in the longer term, Functional Skills Non Statutory qualifications in English, mathematics and ICT at Level 2 should be a requirement for all Apprenticeships . </li></ul><ul><li>We therefore plan to work with SSCs to evaluate the impact that these requirements would have on Apprenticeship starts, completions and costs. In the light of findings from the evaluation, we will consider the case for all frameworks to include Functional Skills qualifications in English, mathematics and ICT at Level 2 by 2016 . </li></ul>
  • 38. Functional Skills: and Key Skills Quals <ul><li>“ Key Skills qualifications in Application of Number, Communication and ICT (together with their acknowledged proxy qualifications) achieved at the equivalent level required by the framework, within the previous five years and before September 2012, will satisfy the requirement for Functional Skills until 2016 . </li></ul><ul><li>However, see previous paragraphs regarding progression to Functional Skills at Level 2. </li></ul>
  • 39. Example frameworks (pre SASE)
  • 40. Example 1.
  • 41. Example 2.
  • 42. Example 3.
  • 43. Example 4. <ul><li>Framework (within the Health and Social Care Framework) Support Services in Health Care NVQ L2 </li></ul><ul><li>Certificate in ‘Working in the Health Sector’ L2 – new Technical Certificate </li></ul><ul><li>• Key Skills L1 </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Communication </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Application of Number </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>• Employer Rights and Responsibilities </li></ul>
  • 44. Programme-Led Apprenticeships <ul><li>Many young people struggle to find employers who will take them on so go down the PLP route </li></ul><ul><li>based in college/training provider and students have to find work placements. </li></ul><ul><li>not employed but get an EMA if they are eligible. </li></ul><ul><li>Both the employer-led and programme-led apprenticeships still lead to the same qualification. </li></ul>
  • 45. Apprenticeships and functional skills <ul><li>“ By September 2010 – when functional skills replace key skills within all apprenticeship frameworks – all young people on the apprenticeship route will take functional skills.” </li></ul><ul><li>Last updated: 10 Jun 2009 </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.qcda.gov.uk/22513.aspx </li></ul>
  • 46. Section 27 (SASE): Functional Skills <ul><li>9. An Apprenticeship framework must specify that an apprentice is to attain Functional Skills qualifications in mathematics and English to at least Level 1. </li></ul><ul><li>10. An Apprenticeship framework may specify that where an apprentice has previously achieved Functional Skills qualification(s) in mathematics and/or English at Level 1 they must progress to the relevant Functional Skills qualification(s) at Level 2. </li></ul><ul><li>11. An Apprenticeship framework may specify that an apprentice is to attain Functional Skills qualifications in mathematics and English at Level 2. </li></ul><ul><li>12. An Apprenticeship framework may specify exemptions from Functional Skills qualifications, until 2016, for those who have achieved equivalent Key Skills qualifications (and their approved proxies) before September 2012 and within the previous five years. Proxy qualifications must be specified in the Apprenticeship framework and must be approved by QCDA and listed on their website </li></ul><ul><li>13. An Apprenticeship framework must specify that an apprentice is to attain a Functional Skills qualification in Information and Communications Technology (ICT) to at least Level 1 where the Issuing Authority, in consultation with employers in the sector and other relevant partners, determine that ICT is directly relevant to effective performance in either the occupation or the employment sector. </li></ul><ul><li>14. An Apprenticeship framework may specify that an apprentice is to attain a Functional Skills qualification in ICT at Level 2 where the Issuing Authority, in consultation with employers in the sector and other relevant partners, determine that ICT is directly relevant to effective performance in either the occupation or the employment sector. </li></ul><ul><li>15. An Apprenticeship framework may specify that an apprentice is to attain a Functional Skills qualification in ICT and may specify the level of the qualification where the Issuing Authority, in consultation with employers in the sector and other relevant partners, determine that ICT is not directly relevant to effective performance in the occupation and in the employment sector. </li></ul>BIS-URN09-1458-SASE-AccWEB
  • 47. At what Level? <ul><li>“ Some frameworks require functional skills at the same level as the apprenticeship, others require it at or one level below. All apprenticeship frameworks will require English and mathematics functional skills, whilst ICT is required by some.” </li></ul><ul><li>Important to check with SCC </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.qcda.gov.uk/22513.aspx </li></ul>
  • 48. 22 apprenticeship frameworks have been amended to allow either key skills or functional skills. (Sept 2009) <ul><li>Construction Skills – construction </li></ul><ul><li>CfA (SSB) – business and administration </li></ul><ul><li>CWDC (SfC&amp;D) – children&apos;s care, learning and development </li></ul><ul><li>E-Skills – IT and telecoms professionals; IT users </li></ul><ul><li>FSSC – accounting; payroll; providing financial services, advising on financial products </li></ul><ul><li>Habia (SSB) – hairdressing; barbering </li></ul><ul><li>ICS (SSB) – customer service </li></ul><ul><li>SEMTA – engineering </li></ul><ul><li>SkillsActive – sporting excellence </li></ul><ul><li>Skills for Care &amp; Development/Skills for Health – health and social care </li></ul><ul><li>Skills for Health - dental nursing; pharmacy assistants and technicians </li></ul><ul><li>Skills for Logistics – carry and deliver goods; warehouse and storage; logistics operations management </li></ul><ul><li>Skillsmart Retail – retail </li></ul><ul><li>TDA (SSB)– supporting teaching and learning in schools </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.qcda.gov.uk/22513.aspx </li></ul>
  • 49. Typical learning ‘organisation’ within an Apprenticeship <ul><li>“ The learning provider provides the knowledge and develops skills while the employer provides the practical experience to put those skills to the test. Training can be classroom based, in a workshop or in a workplace, depending on the subject and on the learning provider.” </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk/Be-An-Apprentice/Other-Questions.aspx#Question4 </li></ul>
  • 50. Advantage: Skills development embedded into the learner’s vocational context <ul><li>Relevant and meaningful applications for Functional Skills </li></ul><ul><li>Learner more aware of the value and importance of the skills – increased motivation </li></ul>
  • 51. Scenarios: <ul><li>Learner works in a work-based setting and goes elsewhere [off site] to work with a Learning Provider/training organisation/college for Key/Functional Skills (including Block Release) </li></ul><ul><li>OR </li></ul><ul><li>Learner is visited, in the work-based setting, by an ‘assessor’ who supports their skills development. </li></ul><ul><li>OR … </li></ul>
  • 52. Functional Skills ‘challenge’ 1: <ul><li>For everyone involved with the Apprenticeship programme, to share a common understanding of Functional Skills; </li></ul><ul><li>For opportunities for the learner to develop and practice their Functional Skills (at required Level) to be indentified and shared with all partners </li></ul>
  • 53. Functional Skills ‘challenge’ 2: <ul><li>For learners to be able to transfer and apply their skills in a wide range of situations and contexts - NOT just those relevant to their vocational area </li></ul><ul><li>For Learners to develop and practise real problem-solving skills – including problems outside of their vocational area </li></ul>
  • 54. Functional Skills ‘challenge’ 3: <ul><li>To prepare, and create the time for, learners to sit the Functional Skills assessments. </li></ul><ul><li>To ‘mesh’ the assessment windows into Learner Programmes - (Block release + remember pilot only at moment ) </li></ul>
  • 55. Functional Skills ‘challenge’ 4: <ul><li>The advent of Functional Skills means that Providers will need to make decisions about the learner ‘portfolios’ that they currently use - </li></ul><ul><ul><li>the portfolio is often used as a progress indicator, and in some cases links to funding </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The portfolio is a very valuable Teaching and Learning approach – important to build on existing effective practice </li></ul></ul>
  • 56. Functional Skills ‘challenge’ 5: <ul><li>To harness ICT to support learners as they develop, apply and practice their Functional Skills </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Curriculum mapping </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Access to eLearning materials </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Supporting communication and collaboration (staff and learner) </li></ul></ul>
  • 57. Functional Skills ‘challenge’ 6: <ul><li>To build on the best of current practice, integrating opportunities for learners to develop, practice and apply their Functional Skills in a range of real situations and contexts [including contexts outside of their vocational area] - building on challenge 2 </li></ul>
  • 58. Need for: <ul><li>a consistent approach to Key/Functional Skills across all settings </li></ul><ul><li>Opportunities for skills development and practice to be mapped across learner programmes </li></ul><ul><li>Time for all partners to collaborate, develop and integrate learner programmes </li></ul><ul><li>Central, and accessible records of learner development and progress to be maintained </li></ul>
  • 59. Need for CPD available via <ul><li>Functional Skills Support Programme </li></ul><ul><li>http:// www.fssupport.org </li></ul>

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