AIMING FOR STUDENT
ACHIEVEMENT: HOW TEACHERS
CAN UNDERSTAND AND BETTER
MEET THE NEEDS OF PACIFIC
ISLAND AND MAORI STUDENTS...
• The Ministry of Education is funding a 5yr development
programme titled Achievement in Multi-Cultural High
Schools, or A...
YEAR 9 STUDENTS
• Better prepare them for the transition from
primary/intermediate to secondary. Many
students reported th...
TEACHER/PARENT RELATIONSHIPS
• Phone each parent in class once a term. Teachers
involved in the AIMHI project observed tha...
KEY TEACHER QUALITIES THAT AIDE
ACHIEVEMENT
• A Teacher which looks after themselves- healthy
body; healthy mind
• Respect...
TEACHER BARRIERS
• Confrontational, angry and negative
• Put-downs and racism
• Favouring students (usually the bright one...
TEACHING STRATEGIES:
• Relationship building (with students, whanau,
and the wider community).
• Student generated questio...
ACTIVITY:
Get into groups- in your groups you can pick from one of
the following options. You have 5 minutes before you
pr...
References:
• Hill, J., & Hawk, K. (1998). Aiming for Student Achievement: How
teachers can understand and better meet the...
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704

  1. 1. AIMING FOR STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT: HOW TEACHERS CAN UNDERSTAND AND BETTER MEET THE NEEDS OF PACIFIC ISLAND AND MAORI STUDENTS Jan Hill and Kay Hawk
  2. 2. • The Ministry of Education is funding a 5yr development programme titled Achievement in Multi-Cultural High Schools, or AIMHI. The goal of the project is to raise the achievement levels of students of the 8 participating schools who have a high population of Pacific Island and Maori students. • Almost all staff were interviewed as well as 900+ students; and Pacific Island and Maori researchers talked to extended family and parents. • As such, many powerful influences on student achievement were identified, many of which is out of the schools control. However a teacher should take into consideration that the students live in various different ‘worlds’ and should always try and consider the bigger picture. However, there are key ideas which Hill and Hawk suggest that schools can do to help their students:
  3. 3. YEAR 9 STUDENTS • Better prepare them for the transition from primary/intermediate to secondary. Many students reported that their previous school’s teachers told them intimidating stories about high school. • Teachers move class rather to help with adjustment. • Try to have the same teacher teach the same class more than one subject. • Peer support programmes for yr9’s.
  4. 4. TEACHER/PARENT RELATIONSHIPS • Phone each parent in class once a term. Teachers involved in the AIMHI project observed that their time and energy always paid off. • Use Pacific Island Language radio station to inform parents of school events and education issues. • Try and arrange alternative times for parent-teacher interviews/talks if parents cannot make schedule evening. • Work through the churches, try and get to know the ministers. • Post newsletters and important documents home, rather than leave the responsibility with the student.
  5. 5. KEY TEACHER QUALITIES THAT AIDE ACHIEVEMENT • A Teacher which looks after themselves- healthy body; healthy mind • Respecting of students and treats them as individuals • Kind, caring, encouraging yet with a sense of humour • Can relate to cultures other than their own • Are knowledgeable and prepare varied and interesting lessons • Put learning into context; explains and scaffold knowledge • Firm but fair
  6. 6. TEACHER BARRIERS • Confrontational, angry and negative • Put-downs and racism • Favouring students (usually the bright ones) • Making assumptions that students have understood and moving on too fast.
  7. 7. TEACHING STRATEGIES: • Relationship building (with students, whanau, and the wider community). • Student generated questioning. • Co-operative learning • Co-constructivism “A Constructivist Classroom is a Student-Centred Classroom” (Educational Broadcasting Cooperation, 2004). How do I apply constructivism in my classroom?
  8. 8. ACTIVITY: Get into groups- in your groups you can pick from one of the following options. You have 5 minutes before you present it to the class. • Come up with several questions you might ask your students in a survey designed to gain an insight to the learning styles and interests of your students. • Create a rough lesson plan where the aim is to co construct classroom expectations. • Script a conversation that you might have on the phone with a parent or caregiver. This is a call you have made for in order to build relationships. • Pick any one of the points on the summary and present an example of this to the class through role play.
  9. 9. References: • Hill, J., & Hawk, K. (1998). Aiming for Student Achievement: How teachers can understand and better meet the needs of Pacific Island and Maori students? SET: Research information for teachers 2.Item 4. Retrieved from NZCER Journals Online. • Educational Broadcasting Cooperation. (2004). Concept to Classroom. Retrieved from http://www.thirteen.org/edonline/concept2class/constructivism/ex ploration.html.
  1. ¿Le ha llamado la atención una diapositiva en particular?

    Recortar diapositivas es una manera útil de recopilar información importante para consultarla más tarde.

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