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Reading Critically
Reading Critically
Reading Critically
Reading Critically
Reading Critically
Reading Critically
Reading Critically
Reading Critically
Reading Critically
Reading Critically
Reading Critically
Reading Critically
Reading Critically
Reading Critically
Reading Critically
Reading Critically
Reading Critically
Reading Critically
Reading Critically
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Reading Critically

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Chapter 1 in Gray-Rosendale

Chapter 1 in Gray-Rosendale

Published in: Education
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Transcript

  • 1. A Critical Perspective:
  • 2. ACTIVE READING is our way to communicate with the text.
    UNDERSTAND WHY YOU READ THE TEXT
    REFLECT ON THE TITLE
    LEARN ABOUT THE AUTHOR OR TIME PERIOD
    ARGUE WITH THE AUTHOR
    CONCENTRATE: READ SLOWLY or OUTLOUD
    ANNOTATE AS YOU READ
    RECORD YOUR INITIAL REACTION IN A JOURNAL
  • 3. There are several ways of responding to a text:
    PERSONAL RESPONSE
    CONTENT RESPONSE
    ANALYTIC RESPONSE
    EVALUATIVE RESPONSE
    RESEARCH RESPONSE
    Tell what you of think of the text and what you got out of it.
    Summarize/paraphrase the text.
    Examine & explain key points of the text, summarizing/ paraphrasing if needed.
    Offer your opinion of a work and support with analysis.
    Present a work in a particular context to support a larger argument.
  • 4. Why do we need content response?
    Use summary, paraphrase, and direct quotes from the original text to show what you mean when you analyze and evaluate the text or use it as a research source in your writing.
  • 5. What is a summary?
    A summary briefly and objectively restates, in your own words, the main points of a work.
    It is shorter and more general than the original work.
  • 6. Summary Requirements
    Starts with the main idea of the text
    In your own words
    Objective
    Accurate
    States main points only (shorter and more general than the original)
    Credits the author and the work
  • 7. How to Write a Summary
    State the main idea of the article in your own words, include the author’s name and title.
    Make a list of keywords that will help you remember the main points of the article.
    Write a simple outline stating the main points of the essay in the order they appear.
    Put away the original. Turn the outline into a summary in your own words (start with the main idea of the text). Use the keywords if necessary. Do not look at the original text.
    After you are done, look at the original and check your summary for accuracy. Add or delete more info if necessary.
  • 8. Let’s practice!
    Summarize “Back Off on the Broccoli” on page 18 using the guidelines. Start your summary with “The author of the editorial “Back Off on the Broccoli” claims that….”
  • 9. What is a Paraphrase?
    A paraphrase accurately clarifies, in your own words, the major and minor points of a work’s part (sentence, paragraph).
    It is as long as or longer than the original work.
  • 10. Paraphrase Requirements
    • Write in your ownwords and sentence structure
    • 11. Be objective – do not bring your own attitude
    • 12. Be accurate – stick to what the author said
    • 13. Clarify main and minor points
    • 14. Credits the author, the work, and the page #.
    • 15. Do not use “I” in the paraphrase of other people’s words (Ignore the example from the textbook.)
  • How to Paraphrase
    Read the passage carefully. What is the author saying? Explain it to someone else or yourself out loud.
    Make a list of keywords. Close the original.
    Paraphrase the original in your own words to clarify the meaning of it. (Smith states that…). Do not use any of the words or sentence structures from the original. Do not judge the topic or the author!
    State the author’s name in the beginning of the paraphrase OR in the end, included in the parentheses, with a page number (Author, p. #).
  • 16. Let’s Practice!
    Paraphrase paragraph 6 of the article “Back Off on the Broccoli.” It starts with “It’s no wonder some mothers…” Follow the paraphrase guidelines from the previous slides.
  • 17. Direct Quotation
    • Start the sentence with the name of the author and a verb (Smith argues/ insists/ opposes/ agrees, …)
    • 18. Include the original sentence, without any changes, in quotation marks: “….”.
    • 19. If you want to omit words from the quotation, insert ellipsis […] instead of omitted words.
    • 20. If you want to add your own word for clarification, use square brackets to signal that the word is not part of the quotation – [and].
    • 21. After the closing quotation marks, put in the page number, included in the parentheses.
  • Quotation Requirements
    Credits the author, the work, and the page number.
    States exact words from the original
    Included in quotation marks
  • 22. Analytic Response
    Breaking the argument into parts and discussing them individually:
    Kinds of support
    Logical reasoning
    Author’s assumptions
    Tone
    Does not include believing and arguing
  • 23. Let’s Practice!
    Analyze the article “Back Off on the Broccoli” using the checklist on page 15. Say what you can. Don’t worry about being incorrect.
  • 24. Evaluative Response
    Making a judgment on how well the argument works:
    Is argument convincing or not? Why?
    Do you agree or disagree? Why?
    Your response must be supported with logical and valid evidence.
  • 25. Let’s Practice!
    Evaluate the article “Back Off on the Broccoli” using the checklist on page 16. Say what you can. Don’t worry about being incorrect.
  • 26. Research Response
    Using the argument as a launch pad to inquire more into the topic and discover more information:
    What questions did the writer leave unanswered?
    What other issues are connected to this argument?
    What else do I need to know to make an educated judgment about the topic?
    Shift your focus to a bigger issue part of which the argument presents or touches upon in some way.

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