Libraries & Equity: An Advocacy Presentation for PA School Libraries

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School library programs are critical to 21st century learners. A presentation related to PA libraries by Joyce Valenza.

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  • Thanks I am going to use this as a presentation to my school board in Colorado. They want to cut the only elementary school librarian we have.
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Libraries & Equity: An Advocacy Presentation for PA School Libraries

  1. 1. All Pennsylvania students deserve an equitable education
  2. 2. Every student deserves the services of an on-site licensed library media specialist.
  3. 3. but . . .
  4. 4. our school library programs are
  5. 5. a tale of inequity
  6. 6. Students and teachers without the services of a qualified library media specialist,
  7. 7. without a funded library program . . .
  8. 8. Rpongsaj. “Locked Doors.”4 Nov. 2006. Flickr Creative Commons Pool. 19 Mar. 2008. <http://www.flickr.com/photos/pong/288223209/>. are at a significant disadvantage.
  9. 9. They are less likely to learn and practice 21st century skills of information and technology literacy,
  10. 10. to understand the importance of digital citizenship in today’s world.
  11. 11. Professional school librarians . . .
  12. 12. build developmentally appropriate collections of reading and research materials
  13. 13. that promote life-long learning and love of reading
  14. 14. Collections look different these days.
  15. 15. collection BLOGS WIKIBOOKS e-books RSS feeds Streamed media databases audiobooks online survey tools web portals books search engines magazines newspapers
  16. 16. Professional school librarians . . .
  17. 17. collaboratively plan, teach and assess with classroom teachers
  18. 18. Professional school librarians . . .
  19. 19. teach critical information and communication skills necessary for academic and business success.
  20. 20. Professional school librarians . . .
  21. 21. help teachers integrate relevant information and communication technologies into lessons.
  22. 22. Professional school librarians . . .
  23. 23. promote use of high quality print and electronic resources.
  24. 24. including our state-funded databases:
  25. 25. Professional school librarians . . .
  26. 26. promote independent reading,
  27. 27. the best in children’s and young adult literature.
  28. 28. Independent reading is critical.
  29. 29. You become a reader because . . .
  30. 30. someone led you to the world of books even before you could read,
  31. 31. let you taste the magic of stories , took you to the library , and allowed you to stay up later at night to read in bed. Jim Trelease, author The Read Aloud Handbook
  32. 32. Unlike public libraries:
  33. 33. “ School libraries help teachers teach and children learn.” First Lady, and former school librarian, Laura Bush
  34. 34. Professional school librarians . . .
  35. 35. work with school leaders and administrators to leverage technology investments,
  36. 36. <ul><li>work to level the playing field, promote equity, help to reduce the achievement gap. </li></ul>
  37. 37. But . . .
  38. 38. <ul><li>The average age of books </li></ul><ul><li>in local school libraries </li></ul><ul><li>is 25 years. </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>(Berks, Bucks, Beaver, and Luzerne regional survey. Follett, 2007) </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul>
  39. 39. Edwards, Ali. “Books.” 12 June 2006. Flickr Creative Commons Pool. 28 Mar. 2008. < http://www.flickr.com/photos/aliedwards/543067160/>.
  40. 40. Nearly 40% of all PA public schools are without a librarian and school library. (estimated 2006-07 data, there are 3,568 public schools and 2,248 school librarians)
  41. 41. In Philadelphia, more than 75% of the city’s 265 public schools do not have a librarian or a library .
  42. 42. Will you endorse this
  43. 43. when evidence shows
  44. 44. For 3 tested grades, the relationship between staffing and PSSA reading scores is positive and statistically significant. Measuring Up to Standards . (c2000) Study of PA School Libraries. <http://www.statelibrary.state.pa.us/ libraries/lib/libraries/measuringup.pdf>.
  45. 45. Three out of five elementary schools with adequate library staff (61%) reported average or above-average reading scores. reading scores Measuring Up to Standards . (c2000) Study of PA School Libraries. <http://www.statelibrary.state.pa.us/ libraries/lib/libraries/measuringup.pdf>.
  46. 46. The same proportion of schools without adequate staffing reported below-average scores. reading scores Measuring Up to Standards . (c2000) Study of PA School Libraries. <http://www.statelibrary.state.pa.us/ libraries/lib/libraries/measuringup.pdf>.
  47. 47. <ul><li>PA middle schools with the best PSSA reading scores spend twice as much on their school libraries as the lowest scoring schools. </li></ul>
  48. 48. More than 18 studies, replicated in states across the country . . . Library Research Service <http://lrs.org>.
  49. 49. show student achievement increases an average of 10%-20%
  50. 50. when school library media centers are staffed with certified school librarians .
  51. 51. In Washington State
  52. 52. three moms,
  53. 53. concerned about reductions in school library programs,
  54. 54. successfully lobbied state legislators for $4 million in emergency bridge funding.
  55. 55. “ Spokane Moms.” 1 Feb. 2008. ALA Fund Our Future Flickr Group . 24 Mar. 2008. <http:// www.flickr.com/photos/ala_members/sets/72157603853026097/ >.
  56. 56. They continue to lobby to ensure students across the state have library programs and certified librarians.
  57. 57. The Washington State legislature is rethinking the meaning of the phrase basic education.
  58. 58. How do library media specialists make a difference?
  59. 59. Media specialists introduce resources and teach students and teachers how to best use them.
  60. 60. Among those resources—our state databases!
  61. 61. Media specialists organize the Web for their learning communities.
  62. 63. Media specialists teach literacy:
  63. 64. traditional literacy
  64. 65. information literacy
  65. 66. media literacy
  66. 67. digital literacy
  67. 68. Media specialists ensure equity:
  68. 69. access for all students:
  69. 71. access to information
  70. 72. in all its formats
  71. 73. access to technology
  72. 74. access to skills
  73. 75. Library media specialists teach learners to . . .
  74. 76. inquire, think critically, gain knowledge research inquire develop a thesis take a stand organize analyze synthesize question apply their learning debate
  75. 77. evaluate information bias relevance timeliness authority points of view credentials In new information formats purpose
  76. 78. draw conclusions, make informed decisions, apply knowledge, create new knowledge
  77. 79. share knowledge, participate ethically & productively
  78. 80. collaborate and create traditional papers blog podcast streamed video concept map digital storytelling public service announcements student-produced digital instruction present
  79. 81. demonstrate information ethics documentation digital citizenship Creative Commons safety respect for intellectual property academic integrity intellectual freedom
  80. 82. pursue personal & aesthetic growth independent reading viewing listening author visits school-wide reading initiatives poetry slams galleries of student work video book trailers collections that meet needs of all learners book fairs review blogs podcast reviews book clubs booktalks
  81. 83. Media specialists are working to ensure the success of the Governor’s CFF technology initiative.
  82. 85. NO EXTRA FUNDING REQUIRED!
  83. 86. Many media specialists are actively involved CFF partners.
  84. 87. Others can be partners with some professional development.
  85. 88. But, what happened to PDE’s School Library Services Division?
  86. 89. at a time we need it most?
  87. 90. Research shows that the highest achieving students attend schools with good library media centers.
  88. 91. The library media specialist builds age & developmentally appropriate collections
  89. 92. in all media formats
  90. 93. for all learners
  91. 94. The media specialist
  92. 95. collaborates in teaching and integrating information and technology literacy standards
  93. 96. and develops learning activities that improve student achievement.
  94. 97. School libraries are not just a nice extra .
  95. 99. School libraries are a core service .
  96. 100. All students deserve an equitable education.
  97. 101. Every Pennsylvania student deserves the services of an on-site licensed library media specialist.
  98. 102. The learners of our state need your support.
  99. 103. They need your action.
  100. 104. Nationwide data available at: Library Research Service Research and Statistics About Libraries,&quot;Impact Studies.&quot; http://www.lrs.org/impact.asp Other statistics available from the American Library Association: http://ala.org/ala/issues/issuesadvocacy.cfm Thanks to Doug Johnson and the librarians of MEMO for their advocacy ideas. Thanks to Deb Kachel, Mansfield University, for local statistics. For more information on the Spokane Moms http://www.fundourfuturewashington.org/
  101. 105. <ul><li>Music </li></ul>Camp, Manolo. “Medieval.” 24 Mar. 2008. <http://www.manolocamp.net/music/mp3/Manolo%20Camp %20-%20Medieval.mp3>.
  102. 106. Prepared by Joyce Kasman Valenza, April 2008.

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