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Presentation on Christians and the Eucharist by Brother Jeffrey Gros, FSC. Used with permission.

Presentation on Christians and the Eucharist by Brother Jeffrey Gros, FSC. Used with permission.

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  • The path taken by the Church in these first years of the third millennium is also a path of renewed ecumenical commitment. The final decades of the second millennium, culminating in the Great Jubilee, have spurred us along this path and called for all the baptized to respond to the prayer of Jesus "ut unum sint " (Jn 17:11). The path itself is long and strewn with obstacles greater than our human resources alone can overcome, yet we have the Eucharist, and in its presence we can hear in the depths of our hearts, as if they were addressed to us, the same words heard by the Prophet Elijah: "Arise and eat, else the journey will be too great for you" (1 Kg 19:7).

Hunger 12 Hunger 12 Presentation Transcript

  • OUR HUNGER FOR COMMUNION At The One Table of the Lord
  • I Presences of Christ in the Eucharist Word Sacrament Church Celebrant PoorII Our Common Liturgical Reform Forms Eucharistic Prayers LectionariesIII Unity in Eucharistic Faith Agreements: Presence SacrificeIV Sacramental Practice Protestant Orthodox Catholic The Church as Communion/ Koinonia
  • I Christ the Center
  • Word
  • Sacrament
  • Church
  • Presider
  • The Poor
  • THE ONE TABLE OF THE LORDI Presences of Christ in the Eucharist Word Sacrament Church Celebrant PoorII Our Common Liturgical Reform Forms Eucharistic Prayers LectionariesIII Unity in Eucharistic Faith Agreements: Presence SacrificeIV Sacramental Practice Protestant Orthodox Catholic The Church as Communion/ Koinonia
  • II Our Common Liturgical Reform Lectionary Eucharistic prayers Sacrifice Frequency Real Presence
  • Worship FormsROMAN MISSAL 1969LUTHERAN BOOK OF WORSHIP 1978BOOK OF COMMON PRAYER 1979 (Anglican/Episcopal)THE U METHODIST BOOK OF WORSHIP 1992BOOK OF COMMON WORSHIP 1993 (Presbyterian)
  • Worship FormsPenitential RiteCollect for the Day LessonsHomily/SermonCreedIntercessionsOffertory PrayersCanon/Great Thanksgiving ( options )CommunionPost-Communion PrayerBenediction and Dismissal
  • THE ONE TABLE OF THE LORDI Presences of Christ in the Eucharist Word Sacrament Church Celebrant PoorII Our Common Liturgical Reform Forms Eucharistic Prayers LectionariesIII Unity in Eucharistic Faith Agreements: Presence SacrificeIV Sacramental Practice Protestant Orthodox Catholic The Church as Communion/ Koinonia
  • III The Pilgrimage toward UnityI Approaches to Real PresenceII Agreements on Real PresenceIII Agreements on Christ’s Sacrifice
  • II Agreements on Real PresenceAll of these [sacred elements], which come from Christ and lead back to him, belong by right to the one church of Christ. The separated brethren also carry out many of the sacred actions of the Christian religion. Undoubtedly, in many ways that varyaccording to the conditions of each church orcommunity, these actions can truly engender a life of grace and can be rightly described as capable of providing access to the community of salvation. (Vatican II 1965)
  • Approaches to Real PresenceI Substantial Realism Transubstantiation II Objective Realism Lutheran, Orthodox, Anglican III Symbolic Realism Reformed IV Memorialism Baptist, Pentecostal, Liberal
  • I Substantial Realism
  • II Objective Realism
  • III Symbolic Realism
  • IV Memorialism
  • THE ONE TABLE OF THE LORD
  • Ch rist’sPre se n cein aQ ua ke rMe e tin g
  • Baptism, Eucharist and Ministry(WCC1982) The Eucharist is essentially the sacrament of the gift which God makes to us in Christ through the power of the Holy Spirit. Every Christian receives this gift of salvation through communion in the body and blood of Christ... The Eucharist is the sacrament of the unique sacrifice of Christ, who ever lives to make intercession for us... Christ’s mode of presence in the Eucharist is unique...
  •  While Christ’s real presence in the Eucharist does not depend on the faith of the individual, all agree that to discern the body and blood of Christ, faith is required... The Spirit makes the crucified and risen Christ really present... It is in virtue of the living word of Christ and by the power of the Holy Spirit that the bread and wine become the sacramental signs of Christ’s body and blood... The Eucharist involves the believer in the central event of the world’s history.
  • ANGLICANS AND CATHOLICS (1982)1) in the Eucharist the Church ... makes present the sacrifice of Calvary.2) God has given the Eucharist to the Church as a means through which all the atoning work of Christ on the cross is proclaimed and made present with all of its effects in the life of the Church.3) This includes the propitiatory effect of Christ’s one sacrifice applies in the eucharistic celebration to both the living and the dead....
  • 3) Christ in the Eucharist makes himself present sacramentally and truly when under the species of bread and wine these earthly realities are changed into the reality of his body and blood... 4) Both of our Churches affirm that after the eucharistic celebration the body and blood of Christ may be reserved for the communion of the sick, or for “adoration of Christ in the reserved sacrament” as practiced by Catholics and some Episcopalians. And 5) “we affirm that only a validly ordained priest can be the minister who, in the person of Christ, brings into being the sacrament of the Eucharist”
  • • I count among the most important results of the ecumenical dialogues the insight that the issue of the eucharist cannot be narrowed to the problem of validity. Even a theology oriented to the concept of succession, such as that which holds in the Catholic and in the Orthodox church, need not in any way deny the salvation-granting presence of the Lord in a Lutheran Lords Supper.• (Ratzinger 1993)
  • THE ONE TABLE OF THE LORDI Presences of Christ in the Eucharist Word Sacrament Church Celebrant PoorII Our Common Liturgical Reform Forms Eucharistic Prayers LectionariesIII Unity in Eucharistic Faith Agreements: Presence SacrificeIV Sacramental Practice Protestant Orthodox Catholic The Church as Communion/ Koinonia
  • IV Sacramental PracticeA PrinciplesB Practices 1) Protestant2) Orthodox3)Catholic
  • A Principles1) Celebration of full communion achieved2) Means of building upthe communion of theChurch
  • A Practices: Protestant 1) Open Communion: The Lord’s Table 2) Close or Closed Communion3) Interim Eucharistic Sharing 4) Open Table
  • B Practices: Orthodox1) No sharing: Economia2) Syrian Orthodox Church - Catholic: Hospitality, Assyrian Church of the East3) Syrian Churches in India: Encouragement at Marriages
  • C Practices: Catholic1) ask for the sacrament on her or his own initiative 2) manifest the catholic faith in the sacrament 3) be properly disposed 4) display a spiritual need for the sacrament
  • This Holy Mystery
  • The Wesleyan tradition has always recognized that Holy Communion may be an occasion for the reception of converting, justifying, and sanctifying grace. Unbaptized persons who receive communion should be counseled and nurtured toward baptism as soon as possible
  • It is our tradition to invite all Christians to the Lord’s table,and the invitation should be extendedto everyone present; but there should obe no pressure that would embarrass those who for whatever reason do not receive Holy Communion. (UMBW)
  • Anglican provinces regularly admit tocommunion baptised believers who arecommunicant members from other Christiancommunities. In certain circumstances,Anglicans permit eucharistic sharing with otherchurches where there is sufficient agreement infaith and commitment to shared life. SomeAnglican Churches recognise that thesacramental ministry of women clergy is notaccepted by some of their faithful, and makeprovision accordingly, although this results inthe impairment of full eucharistic communion.
  • Full CommunionLutheran Episcopal Churches
  • Reconciled Diversity  while neither Lutheran nor Reformed profess to explain how Christ is present and received in the Supper, both churches affirmthat "Christ himself is the host at his table. . .and that Christ himself is fully present and received in the Supper" ELCA, 3 REFORMED (1997)
  • Full communion Reformed, Presbyterian United Church of Christ Evangelical Lutheran
  •  “Grave and pressing need” … means a condition in which being deprived of the Eucharist would, in the judgment of a reasonable person, cause someone to experience a significant sense of deprivation… more than casual…
  • When other Christiansrequest communion…efforts should bemade to determinethat their beliefs aresubstantially the sameas Catholic beliefs…
  •  Communion should not to be withheld at the time of distribution… this circumstance should be dealt with on another occasion in an appropriately pastoral way.
  • Manifesting Catholic faith in the sacrament means that approximately the same knowledge and faith should be required of a Catholic in similar
  • Being properly disposed means being in a good relationship with God or, if not, taking whatever steps are necessary to return to a good relationship with God.
  • invitations to receive the Eucharist at their table may not be accepted by Catholics, we should try to make it clear that our actions flow from a different perspective on the Eucharist and do not represent disdain on our part for their service.
  • The path itself is long and strewn with obstacles greater than our human resources alone canovercome, yet we have the Eucharist,and in its presence we can hear in the depths of our hearts, as if they were addressed to us, the same words heard by the Prophet Elijah: "Arise and eat, else the journey will be too great for you" (1 Kg 19:7).
  • The path taken by the Church in these first years of the thirdmillennium is also a path of renewed ecumenical commitment. The final decades of the second millennium, culminating in the Great Jubilee,have spurred us along this path andcalled for all the baptized to respond to the prayer of Jesus "ut unum sint " (Jn 17:11).
  • The treasure of the Eucharist, whichthe Lord places before us, impels ustowards the goal of full sharing withall our brothers and sisters to whom we are joined by our commonBaptism. But if this treasure is not to be squandered, we need to respect the demands which derive from its being the sacrament of communion in faith and in apostolic succession.
  • THE ONE TABLE OF THE LORDI Presences of Christ in the Eucharist Word Sacrament Church Celebrant Poor II Our Common Liturgical Reform Forms Eucharistic Prayers Lectionaries III The Pilgrimage toward Unity in Eucharistic FaithAgreements: Presence Sacrifice IV Our Diverse Practice Protestant, Orthodox, Catholic The Church as Communion/ Koinonia
  • Multiple Dimensions of Christs Presence in the Eucharistic Celebration Mediator Dei (1947) Pius XII 1) Action of Priest at Mass 2) Eucharistic Elements 3) Sacraments 4) Assembly gathered to pray and sing
  • Sacrosanctum Concilium #7 (1963) Vatican II1) Action 2) Elements 3) Sacraments 4) Word proclaimed 5) Assembly
  • Mysterium Fidei (1965) Paul VI1) Assembly 2) Church performing works of mercy 3) Pilgrim Church 4) Word 5) Church in shepherds
  • Ecclesia in America (1999) John Paul II 1) Scripture 2) Liturgy 3) Elements 4) Needy and poor 5) Bishops & Priests
  • Lectionary
  •  1382: John Wyclifs teachings are condemned by the Synod of London. 1410: Jan Hus 1520 Babylonian Captivity Luther 1521 Luther against the Enthusiasts Ulrich Zwingli 1529: The Marburg Colloquy 1536: John Calvin Institutes of the Christian Religion 1549: Thomas Cranmer issues the Book of Common Prayer
  •  1545-1564: The Council of Trent 1559: Elizabethan "Book of Common Prayer" 1560: Church of Scotland
  • Swiss positions on Lord’s Supper• Zwingli – symbolic memorialism• Bullinger – symbolic parallelism• Calvin – symbolic instrumentalism (symbolic realism)
  • THE ONE TABLE OF THE LORDI Presences of Christ in the Eucharist Word Sacrament Church Celebrant PoorII Our Common Liturgical Reform Forms Eucharistic Prayers LectionariesIII Unity in Eucharistic Faith Agreements: Presence SacrificeIV Sacramental Practice Protestant Orthodox Catholic The Church as Communion/ Koinonia