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How a traditional japanese umbrella “wagasa” is made
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How a traditional japanese umbrella “wagasa” is made

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  • 1.  A Wagasa, Traditional Japanese umbrellas or rain umbrella, made of bamboo and Washi (Japanese paper), is delicately collapsible inward with its elaborate open- close movement. More durable with linseed oil applied.
  • 2.  Firstly, we need to prepared materials such as:I. BambooII. Washi paper / kozo,III. Metal,IV. Wood,V. Linseed oil,VI. Lacquer,VII. Tapioca glue
  • 3.  The bamboos are cut evenly into 48 thin sticks and the sticks are dye with the color of our choice. Then, the sticks will be used to construct the frame of the umbrella and will be attached to a wooden core to create the opening and closing of the umbrella.
  • 4.  After that, a large pieces of washi paper is carefully cut to fit the size and shape of the umbrella. Next an original type of glue made from tapioca is mixed and used.
  • 5.  Later, paste the paper carefully with homemade tapioca glue onto the bamboo frame. This may seem easy, but if it is not done properly, it may put stress on the paper, shortening its life. After drying the glue, the umbrella is folded so that it will close correctly.
  • 6.  Then, various natural pigments, lacquer and other natural materials are used to color and decorate the umbrella
  • 7.  Subsequently, linseed oil is applied to water-proof the umbrella, and then it is left to dry in the sun from a few days up to two weeks.
  • 8.  Lastly, tassel decorations, metal parts, and other final decorative effects are attached to the umbrella to complete the design.
  • 9.  Generally, it takes from a few weeks up to a few months to finish a single umbrella, depending on the size and design. A Japanese umbrella has 30-70 ribs.