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Investigating Urban Health and Linkages between HIV, Migration and Urban Food Security Innovative Comparative Research in Addis Abba, Johannesburg and Windhoek
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Investigating Urban Health and Linkages between HIV, Migration and Urban Food Security Innovative Comparative Research in Addis Abba, Johannesburg and Windhoek

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  • 1. Investigating Urban Health and Linkages between HIV, Migration and Urban Food Security Innovative Comparative Research in Addis Abba, Johannesburg and Windhoek Scott Drimie, Girma Kassie & Jo Vearey University of the Witwatersrand Forced Migration Studies Programme Health and Migration Initiative
  • 2. World Urbanization Prospects (2005 Revision), United Nations, Department of Economic and Social Affairs By 2030, 50% or more of the African population will be living in a city
  • 3. African cities: specific complexities
    • High rates of migration ;
    • Increasing pressure on appropriate housing ;
    • Urban HIV prevalence rates – highest in urban informal areas;
    • Some residents with weak rights to the city;
    • Dependency on survivalist livelihoods located within the informal sector;
    • Increasing urban inequalities that impact ‘urban poor’ groups.
    It is essential to engage with this complexity when investigating urban health. A range of interlinked challenges. Urban health policy makers and programmers face a range of interlinked challenges when working in African cities.
  • 4. Study Objectives
      • Within 3 African Cities (Addis Ababa, Johannesburg & Windhoek):
      • To explore the linkages between HIV, migration and urban food security through a livelihoods lens.
      • To better understand differences in urban livelihood systems .
      • Considers food security and health as key outcomes of diverse livelihood strategies.
  • 5. Investigating Urban Health and Linkages between HIV, Migration and Urban Food Security
    • The study approaches migration as the process that links together people’s livelihoods within the dynamic context of HIV and AIDS.
    • In this framework, both urban and rural households share in the livelihood process, with resource flows moving from urban to rural and from rural to urban contexts.
  • 6. Conceptual Framework
  • 7. Recognising the complexity of African cities: the importance of diversity
    • Renewal study engages complexity:
      • Adopts an “ecohealth” approach
      • Focus on diverse settlement types
      • Complex linkages; people, food, money, goods (reciprocity)
      • Different types of migrants: Internal & external
    • Mixed methodology:
      • Quantitative surveys in Addis Ababa, Johannesburg & Windhoek
      • Qualitative research with different groups including children
      • Engaged decision makers as part of process
    • Connections with other related studies – AFSUN
  • 8. Methodology
    • The same methodology was used across the research sites to ensure comparability of data and outcomes.
    • The cross-disciplinary approach consisted of policy and existing data analysis; standardized questionnaire survey; and in-depth, semi-structured case study and key informant interviews.
  • 9. Policy engagement
    • RENEWAL in-reach model interpreted in different ways by the 3 study teams.
    • Johannesburg : evidence generated first (through the research), used in various advocacy strategies including joint policy brief development and personal relationships.
    • Addis Ababa : more formal approach of scientists engaging decision makers on completion of study; presentations, report submission.
    • Windhoek : “setting the agenda” through interaction with selected officials, report-backs through process and policy implication workshop on completion.
  • 10. Acknowledgements
    • Miriam Grant, Jonathan Crush, Bruce Frayne, Gete Zeleke
    • Aline Philibert (IDRC/CINIBOISE);
    • Namibia: Diane Ashton, John Mushaandja, Akiser Pomuti, Andreas Wienecke
    • Ethiopia: Woldie Asfaw, Gete Zeleke
    • South Africa: Lorena Nunez, Ingrid Palmary, Farah Pirouz, Technical Advisory Group:
      • Brendon Barnes (Wits)
      • Brigitte Bagnol (Wits/Pop Council)
      • Lesley Bourne (MRC)
      • Liz Thomas (MRC/Wits)
    • Survey teams across the study sites including various postgraduate students
    • RENEWAL: Noora Aberman
    • IDRC: Renaud DuPlaen, Francois Gasengayire