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Journalism Scholars Day 2011 presentation

Journalism Scholars Day 2011 presentation

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  • To most readers, a story is only as good as the package it comes in.
  • You have to know the rules before you can break them well.
  • Looks less cluttered
  • Cleaner, more organized and easier to read
  • Font families includes various weights (bold, semibold, regular, light)It’s a silent cue to readers what type of information it is
  • Explain each
  • Keep headline close: if photo is above story, headline goes under photo

Design101 Design101 Presentation Transcript

  • journalismNEWS DESIGN 101 scholars day 2011
  • WHY DESIGN MATTERSStudies have shown that readers enter apage through the dominant photo, thenmove to headlines, cutlines/captions andother elements before reading the story.Design matters.
  • GOALS OF DESIGNDesign isn‟t just about placing stories andphotos on pages. It‟s about using thoseelements to…attract readerstell a compelling story
  • TODAY, WE‟LL…Talk a little about how you can accomplish those goals using four basic design principles.Tackle various elements (headlines, photos, etc.) and how they can improve your design.Please ask questions along the way!
  • RULES OF DESIGN“Good design” is subjective, but there arepretty standard rules to help accomplishthese goals.The best designs use — or break — therules in unexpected ways. But they stillcarefully consider the basic principles.
  • KNOW YOUR AUDIENCE 1
  • ASK YOURSELF:How would your audience best be broughtinto this particular story? How can you besttell them this story?Big photo, catchy headline and 600 words of text? Extra box or pull quote?Maybe it‟s some, all or none of those. Maybe it‟s not a “story” at all but info broken up into small parts with a map, timeline or other graphic.
  • TOP TO BOTTOM Readers typically look at a page in this pattern:Important/interesting info goes at topSomething good to start AND end on
  • MODULAR LAYOUT 2
  • RECTANGLES, RECTANGLES
  • GRIDS: 4, 5, OR 6 COLUMNS
  • VISUALHIERARCHY 3
  • DOMINANT ELEMENTSHierarchy is telling readers where to start— and what is most important on thepage.Elements (headlines and photos) shouldgenerally get smaller as they get fartherdown the page.
  • WHATDOYOUSEEFIRST?
  • CONSISTENCY 4
  • DESIGN IS PERSONALITYA publication‟s design is its personality — itshapes readers‟ earliest opinions of thepaper.The reader should be able to easilyrecognize that personality. Without the frontpage, do they know what newspaperthey‟re reading?
  • CONSISTENT ELEMENTSEstablish personality by consistently:Using the same font families (no more than two)Doing bylines the same every timeHandling info boxes the sameUsing similar color palettes for graphicsKeep it simple
  • TOOLS FOR CONSISTENCYParagraph StylesLibrariesMaster pages
  • EFFECTIVE USE OF ELEMENTS 5
  • HEADLINESShort and sweet: 5-6 words or lessHeadlines must have exciting verbs and be in present tenseUse subheads/deckheads to add more information (they should be at least 10-15 points smaller)Stick to those two font families unless it‟s a really special occasion to use anotherBut don‟t sacrifice readability for beauty
  • HEADLINESHeadlines should go across the length of the storyKeep them as close to story as possible
  • HEADLINESNever „bump‟ headlinesUse rules, boxes, photos, different sizes
  • SPEAKING OF … RULESThey can effectively organize a pageThey should guide, not distract — use 0.5 point lines
  • PHOTOSMost newspapers use a 0.5 frameThe action of the photo should be toward the story — not off the pageExamples: Shooting a gun, everyone looking in a certain directionDo not EVER flip the photo to face the direction you want
  • TEXTAlignment: Ragged right typically featurey, opinion, etc.Dropcap: Big initial letter on first paragraphLeading: Two points higher than font(except for small text like body copy)
  • TEXTNeed to stretch or squeeze your copy?Use leading or kerning/trackingLeading: Kerning:Space between Space betweenlines of text characters +/-25+/-0.3
  • BREAKING UP THE GRAYPullquote/readout: Interesting quote or fact from the storyMug: „Oh, that‟s who that guy is‟Info box: By the numbers, for more information, next meetingTeaser: Box teasing to related storyLogo/Column Sig: Identifies special features with label or columnist‟s mug
  • BREAKING UP THE GRAYThe reader shouldn‟t have to jump over ? these items (or photos) to continue readingNever leave a doubt which direction to keep reading — or they won‟t
  • WHITESPACEWhite spacecan be usedvery well toprovideorganizationto a page …and bringfocus toa design
  • RESOURCESNewspaper Designer‟s HandbookTimHarrower.comNewseum.com > Today‟s Front Pagesapple.copydesk.orgLook at other newspapers, magazines, yearbooks, anything and everythingWant to learn how to do something? Google it!
  • Questions? JOSH MOOREEmail me at • Design • Combined joshrm4@gmail.com copy desks • Student free press rights • WKUI‟ll try to post this PowerPoint at joshrmoore.com