Painting theory poster

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This is the first assignment I go through with my students, each of these concepts is a simple precept in my course that we explore as the course progresses. Here's a link to the packet I use to supplement the poster with: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B6-Qu1ZGIO_7M0ZZZ0hSMHRDTzA/edit?usp=sharing

Students are offered many ways to make the poster, they can paint directly onto it, they can paint on sticker paper, they can paint on paper and stick it to the poster, they can paint on contact paper, any of these methods works. It's an extrememly simple assignment that I call back to all the time when I use academic vocabulary or reference or demonstrate a skill. Like say for instance, "You need to use dry brush here to make this visual texture, remember that from the painting theory poster?" often the student remembers and is able to reproduce or at least converse in the language of that technique. The painting assignments after this one are where they master these techniques and apply them to real world situations.

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Painting theory poster

  1. 1. Painting Theory Poster- Criteria & Objectives• Students will make a painting theory poster exploring fifteen techniques and concepts that are the core of painting. • Students must follow the painting theory guide packet provided by Mr. Turek. • Each component of the color theory poster must be labeled legibly and executed flawlessly to receive full credit. • Students may use watercolors and acrylics, paste of any kind, paper, posterboard, contact paper, sticker paper, graphite, and permanent markers. • Five points will be awarded for creativity making a total of twenty points. A creative execution is exemplified by unique organization, unique or assistive font choices, logical arrangements, more examples than necessary, an obvious aesthetic or design to the execution of each example. • Students must have all fifteen components as follows: • Color theory. 1. Color wheel 2. Complementary color scale 3. Color value scale 4. Two Colors in One 5. B & W Value scale • Brushstroke Techniques. 6. Dry brush 7. Hard edge, opaque strokes 8. Opaque washes 9. Layering opaque vs. transparent washes over a dark subject 10. Layering transparent washes 11. Wet on wet, bleeding, blooms, backwash 12. Graded washes, gradual blends 13. Lifting, blotting, sponging 14. Salt effects, additive effects 15. Blowing, dripping • The objective of this lesson is to understand the fundamentals of painting and color theory as it applies to paint.
  2. 2. Color theory components. •Color wheel •Complementary color scale •Color value scale •Two Colors in One •B & W Value scale
  3. 3. Color Wheel Your color wheel will contain • All three primary colors • All three secondary • All six tertiary colors
  4. 4. Be creative.
  5. 5. Color Value Scales Your color value scale will contain: All six colors with seven steps of shading/tints. Notice the relative starting points of each pure hue.
  6. 6. Complementary Color Scales For each complementary color pair you will make a value scale between the two hues in seven steps. Two Colors in One Pick two simultaneous contrast colors plus a neutral grey to make a color change in different contexts.
  7. 7. Brushstroke Techniques • Dry brush • Hard edge, opaque strokes • Opaque washes • Layering opaque vs. transparent washes over a dark subject • Layering transparent washes • Wet on wet, bleeding, blooms, backwash • Graded washes, gradual blends • Lifting, blotting, sponging • Salt effects, additive effects • Blowing, dripping
  8. 8. Dry brush
  9. 9. Hard edge, opaque strokes
  10. 10. Layering Opaque washes vs. Transparent Washes, over a dark subject A A Opaque wash Transparent wash
  11. 11. Layering Transparent Strokes
  12. 12. Wet-on-wet, bleeding, blooms, backwash
  13. 13. Graded wash, gradual blend
  14. 14. Lifting, blotting, sponging
  15. 15. Salt effects, additive effects
  16. 16. Blowing, dripping
  17. 17. Brushstroke Techniques. 6. Dry brush 7. Hard edge, opaque strokes 8. Opaque washes 9. Layering opaque vs. transparent washes over a dark subject 10. Layering transparent washes 11. Wet on wet, bleeding, blooms, backwash 12. Graded washes, gradual blends 13. Lifting, blotting, sponging 14. Salt effects, additive effects 15. Blowing, dripping Color theory. 1. Color wheel 2. Complementary color scale 3. Color value scale 4. Two Colors in One 5. B & W Value scale

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