Poverty and ethnicity: exploring the connections Tweet or follow using #poveth
Poverty and ethnicity:  exploring the connections Sandra Kerr National Campaign Director Race for Opportunity Business in ...
Overview <ul><li>Race for Opportunity </li></ul><ul><li>Government priorities </li></ul><ul><li>Poverty and ethnicity: Rev...
Race for Opportunity network <ul><li>Employer network that recognise race diversity and inclusion is good business sense f...
Race for Opportunity employers <ul><li>Diverse customers, clients and employees  </li></ul><ul><li>Innovation and creativi...
Government Priorities - DCLG <ul><li>Economic inactivity  amongst Pakistani and Bangladeshi women is over twice as low as ...
Poverty and ethnicity: A review of evidence <ul><li>Complexities and dichotomies recognised  </li></ul><ul><li>‘ One size ...
Challenges for the UK in the future <ul><li>To engage the increasingly diverse talent pool emerging in the UK  </li></ul><...
Career Progression The importance of career progression to UK workers
Career Progression <ul><li>Key findings </li></ul><ul><li>Perceived barriers to career advancement include:  </li></ul><ul...
Career Progression <ul><li>Key findings </li></ul><ul><li>BAME workers know what they require from their workplace yet mor...
Increased collaboration <ul><li>Increased collaboration between Employers, Academia, Government and </li></ul><ul><li>Poli...
Thank You
Poverty and ethnicity: exploring the connections Tweet or follow using #poveth
Poverty and ethnicity Dr Elizabeth Henry www.rota.org.uk
About ROTA www.rota.org.uk <ul><li>Race on the Agenda (ROTA) is a social policy research organisation that focuses on issu...
What has changed? <ul><li>The Scarman Inquiry into the 1981 riots reported the disproportionate and indiscriminate use of ...
What has changed? <ul><li>In 1971 in inner London: 17% of children in mainstream schools were from BAME groups, while 34% ...
So what has changed, and what difference can we now make?
What are the current challenges? <ul><li>Educational Maintenance Allowance  (EMA): In 2008, 43% of all 17 to 18 year old s...
What are the current challenges? <ul><li>Welfare and housing benefit reforms  will impact disproportionately on certain BA...
What needs to happen? <ul><li>Support for community-based responses. </li></ul><ul><li>The success of our Female Voice in ...
Poverty and ethnicity: exploring the connections Tweet or follow using #poveth  Wi Fi: CCC Auditorium Password: cav12345
Scoping the new programme  <ul><li>Literature scanning </li></ul><ul><li>Meetings and formal roundtable events </li></ul><...
Overarching themes <ul><li>Intersectionality is vital - to understand ethnicity we must also consider  </li></ul><ul><ul><...
The goal of the programme <ul><li>Increase understanding of the relationship between poverty and ethnicity </li></ul><ul><...
Key areas for investigation <ul><li>Four of the topics highlighted by the scoping work </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Caring and ea...
Workshops <ul><li>Based around the topics of the expert papers </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Education </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>...
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  • I am going to focus on 4 things for my presentation
  • Not only does it have a negative impact on individuals it can be very costly to unravel once flaws appear which could have been identified with sufficient consultation and engagement of key stakeholder groups during the process of development.  
  • Globalisation: global tremors the UK is connected to the rest of the world, this cannot be undone. I can only foresee more connectedness.
  • DCLG Presentation context: Integration happens naturally for most communities over time and individuals, with immigrant communities amongst the highest achieving in our schools, public life and the private sector.         But some individuals and communities get stuck – where problems persist over multiple generations, and / or where barriers to social mobility combine to intensify integration challenges:
  • This is an excellent initiative by the Joseph Roundtree Foundation and I am delighted that they have taken the deliberate step to include this on their agenda and commissioned these scoping papers. I have read through the Round up review of the evidence and what was glaringly absent for me was the very limited information on employer good practice and actions that work and would provide guiding principles on attraction, recruitment, induction, retention and progression. You cannot tackle Poverty and ethnicity in the UK with work being a central plank to that, and it is vital to have employers on board and committed to make fair and inclusive action to ensure inclusion of ethnic minority people. Extremely important as education, skills and work is the route out of poverty. Also increases social capital through expanded networks Employers promoting the use of affinity networks, mentoring and senior leaders becoming involved in active sponsorship  
  • Engage the increasingly diverse talent pool emerging in the UK - this like globalisation cannot be undone Tackle key challenges – linked to work identified within the papers being launched today Faster growth of ethnic minority communities with many of the multiple challenges set out in these papers should create an urgency and prioritisation to finding workable solutions and effective support. To avoid communities continuing to expand with the existing challenges – in greater volume. Enterprise and procurement: identify opportunities to support enterprise and embed diversity and inclusion considerations within supplier chains to enable new business to be sustainable and economic generation of communities to be business contribution to bid society goals Ensure inclusiveness within Localism and the Big Society agenda and actions : These are great ideologies that will be most effective when they engage all communities within the UK and facilitate the engagement of young people and Increased collaboration between Employers, Academics, Government and policy makers to provide effective and informed policy solutions through to pilot and implementation
  • Research into historic recessions have meant that ethnic minority people have become greater casualty of job losses however the Ethnic Minority Advisory Group have been monitoring this with the support of Department for Work and Pension and we have not seen a repeat of this. It still needs constant review as the public sector cuts kick in as we now that the public sector employees high volumes of ethnic minority people. Employers who have worked with Race for Opportunity for a number of years also know this. Employees of Indian origin have better outcomes within the workplace than any of the other ethnic minority groups. Employers are not happy with this and want to see representation according the full diversity of all ethnic groups in the UK. A Recent Survey conducted by Research consultants for RfO provides us with some key insights to what different ethnicity groups in the UK want and aspire to in work: Interestingly common desires identified across all ethnicity groups are: Interestingly larger numbers of ethnic minority people are paid less than £25k Feeling Valued and included, fair and proper pay with bonus scheme as appropriate and training to enable them to be effective in their job roles. We will be publishing a report on these findings in June. But here is a snapshot.
  • Practical toolkit – how to for key stakeholders in employee progression in the workplace: Senior leaders, Line managers, Individuals
  • Common things that the UK workforce want – however the ‘Value gap’ ie what employees want – what the believe their employer provides = the value gap It is a different size gaps for different ethnicity groups. The only way and employer is going to begin to close that gap is to listen to understand what ‘being valued’ means to different groups to better understand how you might close the gap because some of the key causes of stress at work are: Not feeling valued Not having proper/fair pay Not having sufficient training Poor relationships with line managers
  • I am delighted to say that Race for Opportunity is doing some research in partnership with Dr Victoria Showumi from the Institute of Education, University of London on ‘Leadership and identity of Ethnic Minority Women.’ Much has been written on the notion of leadership, mainly with a focus on the characteristics of leadership with very little exploring leadership and identity. As we start to understand the findings which have emerged from the recent survey, there is a need to take a closer look at whether BAME identity forms part of a bigger discussion on work enablers for BAME women. It is crucial that the voices of BAME women are included when developing specific research and development programmes.   As part of this we will be exploring leadership positions held within organisations, in the wider community, experiences of enabling leadership in the workplace, aspirations to leadership positions, access to opportunities to access leadership positions
  • Presentation cover page - this is a single slide not linked to Slide Master.
  • ROTA is a social policy research organisation that focuses on issues imp. Our policy priorities are health, education and criminal justice. We are a membership organisation with over 20 years of experience. We host four networks with a combined membership of over 3,500. I’m here today to talk to you about education. As I am sure you’re aware, there are wide ranging reforms going on in education. Last November, Government published its education white paper and in February its Education Bill was introduced to parliament.   There is briefing about the reforms and other information on our website.
  • Over the last year or two have been developing the programme we are launching today focusing on poverty and ethnicity. This has included meeting and speaking to lots of people across the field, who have been extremely generous with their time and expertise, and also more formal roundtable events and commissioned work. We commissioned the qualitative community consultations to help to ground the programme in the experiences of people across different ethnicities and how the various different issues play out together in people’s lives. The expert papers have distilled the existing evidence and set out what we know about each area and where the gaps are.
  • The scoping work provides a great evidence base and is very rich, I won’t try to summarise it here but would definitely recommend reading the reports that are on the memory stick in everyone&apos;s packs! For now I will just highlight a couple of themes that have emerged across different areas. Informal processes – the texture of everyday life, the decision and assumptions that individuals and also families, communities, employers and so one have, perceptions of risk and opportunities Wider structures – such as labour markets, housing options, geography, social norms, including racism and discrimination
  • Mechanisms e.g. social networks, individual and group decision making, how ethnicity influences that impact of area on opportunities, barriers and decisions.
  • The programme will cover a range of topics, types of research and other activity but four areas that came out of the scoping research as being ones that may be crucial to tackling poverty more effectively and where there was a gap in evidence are… Caring and earning The changing ways that families across different ethnic groups and in different places are managing their caring and economic needs the implications of this for both care services and labour market policies and for family life. In work poverty: especially the role of informal workplace cultures and how these affect access to promotion and training and progression in work How social networks affect people’s opportunities to escape poverty, how this is changing for new generations and new groups, the evolving role of digital networks Places: the incredibly varied experiences of people from different backgrounds in the same places and people with a similar background in different places. The role of factors such as labour markets, housing, networks and so on. Hope this will feed into more effective local as well as national action on poverty. The workshops this afternoon are each based around these expert papers. The authors will give a short presentation highlighting some of their key findings and then we hope that we will be having some very lively discussions about the key issues in each area, what the evidence currently tells us, what this means for what actions need to be taken and also for what this new programme can contribute to move things forward. We are enabling everyone to go to workshops on two topics because one of the most interesting and improatnt aspects of all this is how the different areas are linked and affect one another. Ann Phoenix will be visiting each workshop and will be drawing togheter soemomf the key pionts across them for our final plenary session at the end of the afternoon. Our keynote speakers will also be going into the workshops and giving their reflections at the end of the day.
  • The workshops this afternoon are each based around these expert papers. The authors will give a short presentation highlighting some of their key findings and then we hope that we will be having some very lively discussions about the key issues in each area, what the evidence currently tells us, what this means for what actions need to be taken and also for what this new programme can contribute to move things forward. We are enabling everyone to go to workshops on two topics because one of the most interesting and important aspects of all this is how the different areas are linked and affect one another. Ann Phoenix will be visiting each workshop and will be drawing together some of the key points across them for our final plenary session at the end of the afternoon. Our keynote speakers will also be going into the workshops and giving their reflections at the end of the day.
  • Jrf poverty-and-ethnicity-presentations-may-2011

    1. 1. Poverty and ethnicity: exploring the connections Tweet or follow using #poveth
    2. 2. Poverty and ethnicity: exploring the connections Sandra Kerr National Campaign Director Race for Opportunity Business in the Community
    3. 3. Overview <ul><li>Race for Opportunity </li></ul><ul><li>Government priorities </li></ul><ul><li>Poverty and ethnicity: Review of Evidence </li></ul><ul><li>Challenges for the UK in the future </li></ul>
    4. 4. Race for Opportunity network <ul><li>Employer network that recognise race diversity and inclusion is good business sense for employers in the UK. </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>Government Departments and policy makers who recognise the need to be diverse as employers and to consult and engage with all the diverse groups in the UK on policy and practice to ensure they develop effective policy solutions that do not unwittingly discriminate or disadvantage any group. </li></ul>
    5. 5. Race for Opportunity employers <ul><li>Diverse customers, clients and employees </li></ul><ul><li>Innovation and creativity produced from increased diversity in teams </li></ul><ul><li>The UK talent pool now and in the future </li></ul><ul><li>Globalisation and engaging new markets - EMEA </li></ul><ul><li>Reputation and profile </li></ul>
    6. 6. Government Priorities - DCLG <ul><li>Economic inactivity amongst Pakistani and Bangladeshi women is over twice as low as the national average - 27% compared to 70%. </li></ul><ul><li>Irish Traveller and Gypsy/Roma children are most likely to be permanently excluded from school, and are the only ethnic group whose performance has deteriorated significantly in recent years </li></ul><ul><li>On average, five times more Black people than White people are imprisoned in England and Wales – a more disproportionate figure than in the USA </li></ul><ul><li>Nearly 20% of people believe that to be truly British you have to be white </li></ul>
    7. 7. Poverty and ethnicity: A review of evidence <ul><li>Complexities and dichotomies recognised </li></ul><ul><li>‘ One size fits all’ solutions not appropriate: </li></ul><ul><li>Better understanding needed on some of the key issues across the board </li></ul><ul><li>Glaring absence of evidence of what employers are doing and the good practice that could provide guiding principles to facilitate improved employment outcomes: attraction, recruitment, retention and progression </li></ul>
    8. 8. Challenges for the UK in the future <ul><li>To engage the increasingly diverse talent pool emerging in the UK </li></ul><ul><li>To tackle key challenges linked to work </li></ul><ul><li>Enterprise and procurement </li></ul><ul><li>Ensure inclusiveness within Localism and the Big Society agenda and actions </li></ul><ul><li>Increased collaboration between Employers, Academia, Government and policy makers to provide effective and informed policy solutions through to pilot and implementation </li></ul>
    9. 9. Career Progression The importance of career progression to UK workers
    10. 10. Career Progression <ul><li>Key findings </li></ul><ul><li>Perceived barriers to career advancement include: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>a shortage of promotion opportunities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>demand for mentors and expanding professional networks </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>a lack of support or poor relationships with their manager </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Some ethnic minority groups cited racism as a barrier </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Well over half of BAME workers believe they are treated unfairly by recruitment agents when being put forward for roles </li></ul></ul>
    11. 11. Career Progression <ul><li>Key findings </li></ul><ul><li>BAME workers know what they require from their workplace yet more than half said their employer did not provide what they were looking for. </li></ul><ul><li>Most commonly cited factors for joining or staying with an employer were : </li></ul><ul><ul><li>the organisation values its workers; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>there are fair pay arrangements with a bonus scheme; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>appropriate training is available . </li></ul></ul>
    12. 12. Increased collaboration <ul><li>Increased collaboration between Employers, Academia, Government and </li></ul><ul><li>Policy makers to provide effective and informed policy solutions through to </li></ul><ul><li>pilot and implementation </li></ul><ul><li>‘ Leadership and identity of ethnic minority women’ </li></ul><ul><li>Race for Opportunity, </li></ul><ul><li>Dr Victoria Showunmi, Institute of Education, University of </li></ul><ul><li>London </li></ul><ul><li>Ethnic Minority Advisory Group [EMAG] </li></ul>
    13. 13. Thank You
    14. 14. Poverty and ethnicity: exploring the connections Tweet or follow using #poveth
    15. 15. Poverty and ethnicity Dr Elizabeth Henry www.rota.org.uk
    16. 16. About ROTA www.rota.org.uk <ul><li>Race on the Agenda (ROTA) is a social policy research organisation that focuses on issues impacting on Black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) communities. Our policy priorities are health, education and criminal justice. </li></ul><ul><li>Membership is free and the online membership form only takes a few minutes to complete. Members automatically receive our services including invitations to events, policy briefings, our monthly policy e-bulletin and more. </li></ul><ul><li>To join, visit www.rota.org.uk. </li></ul>
    17. 17. What has changed? <ul><li>The Scarman Inquiry into the 1981 riots reported the disproportionate and indiscriminate use of ‘stop and search’ powers by the police against Black people </li></ul><ul><li>30 years later, Black people are stopped and searched by the police at more than 7 times the rate of White people and Asians are stopped and searched at more than twice the rate of White people. </li></ul>
    18. 18. What has changed? <ul><li>In 1971 in inner London: 17% of children in mainstream schools were from BAME groups, while 34% in ESN schools were; four out of these children were of West Indian origin. </li></ul><ul><li>40 years later, nearly 6% of all pupils experienced a fixed term exclusion compared with 17% of Irish Traveller, 16% of Gypsy/Roma, 11% of Black Caribbean and 11% of mixed Black Caribbean and White pupils. </li></ul>
    19. 19. So what has changed, and what difference can we now make?
    20. 20. What are the current challenges? <ul><li>Educational Maintenance Allowance (EMA): In 2008, 43% of all 17 to 18 year old students received EMA compared to over 80% of Bangladeshi students; 70% of British Pakistani students; over 55% of black African students and 50% of black Caribbean students do. </li></ul><ul><li>Further segregation within education. </li></ul><ul><li>Discipline and exclusion in education is an equalities issue. </li></ul>
    21. 21. What are the current challenges? <ul><li>Welfare and housing benefit reforms will impact disproportionately on certain BAME groups. </li></ul><ul><li>Child Poverty Strategy is a missed opportunity to address high poverty levels among certain BAME groups. Contradicted by public spending cuts and reforms in welfare and education. </li></ul><ul><li>The Equality Act 2010 is vulnerable. </li></ul><ul><li>The capacity of the BAME voluntary and community sector is much reduced. </li></ul>
    22. 22. What needs to happen? <ul><li>Support for community-based responses. </li></ul><ul><li>The success of our Female Voice in Violence project is attributable to the personal experience of the girls who pioneered it. </li></ul><ul><li>The movement; mobilisation to involvement, inclusion, voice & representation </li></ul><ul><li>Engaging with young people. </li></ul><ul><li>What difference can we now make? </li></ul>
    23. 23. Poverty and ethnicity: exploring the connections Tweet or follow using #poveth Wi Fi: CCC Auditorium Password: cav12345
    24. 24. Scoping the new programme <ul><li>Literature scanning </li></ul><ul><li>Meetings and formal roundtable events </li></ul><ul><li>Commissioned work </li></ul><ul><ul><li>3 community consultations in London, Bradford and Inverness & the Highlands </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Range of groups including Bangladeshi, Somali, Polish, Chinese, African-Caribbean, White British, White Scottish </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>6 expert papers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Education, unpaid caring, employer practices, social networks, the role of place, inequality within ethnic groups </li></ul></ul></ul>
    25. 25. Overarching themes <ul><li>Intersectionality is vital - to understand ethnicity we must also consider </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Gender, age, religion, disability, health, location… </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Individuals’ outcomes are shaped by: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Informal processes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Wider structures </li></ul></ul><ul><li>We need evidence about the interaction between </li></ul><ul><ul><li>How people make decisions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The constraints & opportunities around them </li></ul></ul>
    26. 26. The goal of the programme <ul><li>Increase understanding of the relationship between poverty and ethnicity </li></ul><ul><li>Use it to create more effective approaches to tackling poverty across all ethnicities </li></ul>
    27. 27. Key areas for investigation <ul><li>Four of the topics highlighted by the scoping work </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Caring and earning </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How ethnicity affects in work poverty </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How social networks can support people to escapee poverty </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The influences of the places people live and work in </li></ul></ul>
    28. 28. Workshops <ul><li>Based around the topics of the expert papers </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Education </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Caring </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Employer practices and behaviour </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Social networks </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The role of places </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Inequality within groups </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Final plenary session will draw out links across areas </li></ul><ul><ul><li>And consider ways forward </li></ul></ul>
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