1
Enhancing Facilitation Skills
Paraluman R. Giron, Ed. D.
2
Are youa _________
sage onthe stage? guide on the side?
3
Objectives
1. Increase trainers’ ability
to facilitate effective,
participatory trainings.
2. Provide opportunity to
tra...
4
Who am I?
5
Earth
Wind
Fire
Water
Which one are you most like?
6
List at least three
(3) characteristics.
Describe what the
element does.
7
Write down your
name on top of your
list.
You have now
created a powerful
WORD PICTURE about
yourself.
8
I am ___________ .
I, ___________ am.
WIND
WIND is invisible,
powerful, untamed,
moody, exciting...
9
WIND blows,
soothes,
comforts,
pollinates,
excites, stirs. . .
10
the soil that supports
and nurtures living things.
I give solid footing to those
I am earth
Meditation
By Laurie Beth J...
11
I am wind
the power that sweeps away
old fears and carries new
ideas like springtime.
12
I am fire
Igniting the power
and passion in
others. I give
warmth on cold,
wintry nights, and
clear the way for
new beg...
13
I am water
Irresistible. No obstacle can stop
me. I go over, under, around and
through. I change forms to steam
or ice ...
14
Who Am I?
15
A Right Brain Exercise
A facilitator is like
_________________ to me.
16
Individual Task
List at least three (3)
characteristics of an
effective facilitator of
learning.
17
Group Task (15 minutes)
1. Share your list with
the group.
2. Come up with at least
five (5) common
answers.
18
3. Prepare your output
using a power point
presentation.
4. Select a member to
present the group
output in three (3)
mi...
19
 What common
answers were
presented?
 How do we classify
them?
20
knowledge
values
and
attitudes
skills
21
A confident and skilled facilitator
is an accomplished dancer.
22
23
One notices
the dance
but not the
dancers.
24
The accomplished
dancer…directs process, yet
supremelyflexible;
follows principles not
rules;
25
sets aside judgment ;
improvises;
directs orrequests;
knows own cognitive styles
and stretches beyond them;
26
thinks beyond activities to
outcomes;
mediatestension;
27
reflective andlearn from
experience;
keenobserver;
firm orsoft;
confidentandcompetent.
28
Three (3) Fundamental Questions
for Self-Reflection
1. Where am I going?
29
2. Where am I now?
30
3. How can I close the gap?
31
Conditions which facilitate
learning- Acceptance
- Cooperation, care, concern
change, communication
- Trust oneself / o...
32
Principles of Learning
- Learning and experience occur inside
the learners
Controlled by the learner
People learn what ...
33
- Emotional and intellectual
process
- Learner is the richest
resource
34
Four Stages of Experiential
Learning Process
1 Activity
2 Analysis
3 Abstraction
4 Application
New Experience,
re-learn...
35
Activity
(Experience)
 Describes the
structural experiences
designed to engage
the participant-learner
in activity dea...
36
The experiences may be:
 direct or vicarious
 case analysis
 questionnaires to be answered
 simulation exercises
 ...
Processing
Questions
37
 What is going on?
 How do you feel about that?
 What do you need to know
to…?
 Would you be w...
38
 Could you offer a
suggestion?
 What would you prefer?
 What are your suspicious?
 What is your objection?
 If you...
39
 Can you say that in another
way?
 What is the worst/best that
could happen?
 What else?
 And?
 Would you say more...
40
Analysis (Reflective
Feedback)
 Describes the process
of inquiry into the
results of the Activity.
41
Includes:
 What questions are to be
raised?
 What data will surface?
 How will personal insights
be evoked and proce...
Processing Questions
Questions are directed toward
generating data.
42
 Who would volunteer to share?
Who else?
 What we...
43
 Who reached differently?
 Were there any
surprises/puzzlements?
 How many felt the same?
 How many felt differentl...
The following questions are
directed towards making
sense of the generated data:
44
 How did you account for that?
 How ...
45
 What struck you about that?
 How do those fit together?
 How might it have been different?
 Do you see something o...
46
Abstraction (Integration)
 Describes the
generalization that will/can
be derived from the Activity
and Analysis
47
In this portion, theory
input(s), lecturettes, or other
activities may be included to
explain or recapitulate the
vari...
Processing Questions
48
Questions are directed toward
prompting generalizations:
 What might we draw/pull from
that?
 Is...
49
 What does that suggest to
you about ______ in general?
 Does that remind you of
anything?
 What principles/law do y...
50
 Does that remind you of
anything? What does that
help explain?
 How does this relate to other
experiences?
 What do...
51
Application (Practical
Synthesis)
 Provides activities
which will enable
participant-learners
to transfer concepts
lea...
52
Provides mechanisms by
which learner is able to
evaluate his/her attainment
of the instrumental
(learning content) and...
53
 These may include the
following:
 Action plans
 Assignments
 Evaluation activities/
instruments to check
understan...
Processing Questions
Questions are directed
towards applying the general
knowledge they have gained
to their personal and/...
55
 How could you apply/transfer
that?
 What would you like to do
with that?
 How could you repeat this?
 What could y...
56
What are the options?
What might you do to
help/hinder yourself?
How could you make it
better?
57
 What would be the
consequences of doing/not
doing that?
 What modifications can you
make work for you?
 What could ...
58
A final stage can be added
here, that of processing the
entire experience as a
learning experience.
Questions are aimed...
59
 How might it have been
more meaningful?
 What changes would you
make?
 What would you continue?
60
 If you had to do it over
again, what would you do?
 What additions/deletions
would help?
 Any suggestions?
61
Attitude Portrait of a
Facilitator of Learning
 Realness
 the most basic
 real person
 no front or facade
62
 Prizing, acceptance,
trust
 prizing each
participant
 respect for
worth of individual
63
 Empathic understanding
 standing in the
participants shoes
 making participants
feel understood not
judged or evalu...
64
“At last someone
understands how it feels
and seems to be me
without to analyze or
judge me. Now I can
blossom, grow an...
65
Creating Exemplary
Learning Experiences
1. Plan ahead;
2. Set expectations;
3. Organize your materials;
4. Use visuals
66
5. Plan for breaks;
6. Review the main concepts;
7. Make an impact at the
end;
8. Provide snacks
9. Have fun!
67
Presentation skills, tools
and techniques
68
Presenting Styles
Why is it
important to
be aware of
your
presenting
style?
69
• It affects the
learners.
70
• It can
encourage
the use of
a variety
of teaching
techniques.
71
• It enables
acceptance of
those who are
different from you.
72
Learning Environment
How can a trainer create a
learning environment that
helps adults learn?
73
• Set ground rules;
• Encourage
participation;
• Facilitate more than
lecture.
74
Handling Difficult
Participants Effectively
• Remain calm
• Give the person a task
to do
• Ask for others in class
to r...
75
Presentation Behaviors
Verbal
 Pitch, volume, speech
rate;
 Emphasize key points;
 Avoid um, uh, er.
76
Visual
 Appearance;
 Mannerisms.
Scan for Learning
Reactions
 Are they asleep?
 Do they look puzzled?
77
Overcoming Difficulties
Use planned questions
and ask them more often.
Allow more time.
* Learners must think through
q...
78
Providing Games
79
Have Fun
Learning does not have
to be painful. Work at
exciting the “child” that
lives in all of us.
80
More fun for you, as
a trainer, as well as for
participants, if your
“child” is involved.
81
Learning will
be hindered
if the
attention of
participants
is limited.
82
Time
Know your
limits in terms of
realizing your goals.
Consider the
following questions:
83
A. How much time
are you allotted?
B. Are you building
in breaks?
C. Are you building in
time for reflecting
and integr...
84
D. Are you taking into
account slippage
(what you may not
anticipate can still
happen!)
85
Evaluation
Paying attention to the
“energy levels” of the
participants and yourself will
help you evaluate the
training...
86
You may make the last-
minute changes
throughout the experience
according to your ongoing
evaluations.
87
Concluding evaluations
serve the dual purpose of
giving the trainer feedback
and helping participants
integrate what th...
88
Final Touch
89
90
91
92
93
94
 Elements of Greatness
 Video developed by Profiles International, Inc.
95
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Enhancing facilitation skills

797
-1

Published on

0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
797
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
34
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Enhancing facilitation skills

  1. 1. 1 Enhancing Facilitation Skills Paraluman R. Giron, Ed. D.
  2. 2. 2 Are youa _________ sage onthe stage? guide on the side?
  3. 3. 3 Objectives 1. Increase trainers’ ability to facilitate effective, participatory trainings. 2. Provide opportunity to trainers for self-reflection and self-analysis. 3. Guide trainers’ to craft their personal facilitation skills enhancement plan.
  4. 4. 4 Who am I?
  5. 5. 5 Earth Wind Fire Water Which one are you most like?
  6. 6. 6 List at least three (3) characteristics. Describe what the element does.
  7. 7. 7 Write down your name on top of your list. You have now created a powerful WORD PICTURE about yourself.
  8. 8. 8 I am ___________ . I, ___________ am. WIND WIND is invisible, powerful, untamed, moody, exciting...
  9. 9. 9 WIND blows, soothes, comforts, pollinates, excites, stirs. . .
  10. 10. 10 the soil that supports and nurtures living things. I give solid footing to those I am earth Meditation By Laurie Beth Jones Meditation By Laurie Beth Jones
  11. 11. 11 I am wind the power that sweeps away old fears and carries new ideas like springtime.
  12. 12. 12 I am fire Igniting the power and passion in others. I give warmth on cold, wintry nights, and clear the way for new beginnings.
  13. 13. 13 I am water Irresistible. No obstacle can stop me. I go over, under, around and through. I change forms to steam or ice or rain. I bring life wherever I go. I touch everyone I meet.
  14. 14. 14 Who Am I?
  15. 15. 15 A Right Brain Exercise A facilitator is like _________________ to me.
  16. 16. 16 Individual Task List at least three (3) characteristics of an effective facilitator of learning.
  17. 17. 17 Group Task (15 minutes) 1. Share your list with the group. 2. Come up with at least five (5) common answers.
  18. 18. 18 3. Prepare your output using a power point presentation. 4. Select a member to present the group output in three (3) minutes.
  19. 19. 19  What common answers were presented?  How do we classify them?
  20. 20. 20 knowledge values and attitudes skills
  21. 21. 21 A confident and skilled facilitator is an accomplished dancer.
  22. 22. 22
  23. 23. 23 One notices the dance but not the dancers.
  24. 24. 24 The accomplished dancer…directs process, yet supremelyflexible; follows principles not rules;
  25. 25. 25 sets aside judgment ; improvises; directs orrequests; knows own cognitive styles and stretches beyond them;
  26. 26. 26 thinks beyond activities to outcomes; mediatestension;
  27. 27. 27 reflective andlearn from experience; keenobserver; firm orsoft; confidentandcompetent.
  28. 28. 28 Three (3) Fundamental Questions for Self-Reflection 1. Where am I going?
  29. 29. 29 2. Where am I now?
  30. 30. 30 3. How can I close the gap?
  31. 31. 31 Conditions which facilitate learning- Acceptance - Cooperation, care, concern change, communication - Trust oneself / others - Ideas (different ideas) - Value for individual differences - Evaluation (self-evaluation)
  32. 32. 32 Principles of Learning - Learning and experience occur inside the learners Controlled by the learner People learn what they want to learn - Evolutionary process / Experimental - Acceptance where people are free to explore: Active and personal involvement - Right to make mistakes / Respect - Needs based / Relevant to the learner
  33. 33. 33 - Emotional and intellectual process - Learner is the richest resource
  34. 34. 34 Four Stages of Experiential Learning Process 1 Activity 2 Analysis 3 Abstraction 4 Application New Experience, re-learning, un- learning
  35. 35. 35 Activity (Experience)  Describes the structural experiences designed to engage the participant-learner in activity dealing with the concepts to be used/learned.
  36. 36. 36 The experiences may be:  direct or vicarious  case analysis  questionnaires to be answered  simulation exercises  personal disclosure sessions  etc.
  37. 37. Processing Questions 37  What is going on?  How do you feel about that?  What do you need to know to…?  Would you be willing to try?  Could you be more specific?
  38. 38. 38  Could you offer a suggestion?  What would you prefer?  What are your suspicious?  What is your objection?  If you could guess at the answer, what would it be?
  39. 39. 39  Can you say that in another way?  What is the worst/best that could happen?  What else?  And?  Would you say more about that?
  40. 40. 40 Analysis (Reflective Feedback)  Describes the process of inquiry into the results of the Activity.
  41. 41. 41 Includes:  What questions are to be raised?  What data will surface?  How will personal insights be evoked and processed/ discussed?
  42. 42. Processing Questions Questions are directed toward generating data. 42  Who would volunteer to share? Who else?  What went on/happened?  How did you feel about that?  Who else had the same experience?
  43. 43. 43  Who reached differently?  Were there any surprises/puzzlements?  How many felt the same?  How many felt differently?  What did you observe?  What were you aware of?
  44. 44. The following questions are directed towards making sense of the generated data: 44  How did you account for that?  How does that mean to you?  How was that significant?  How was that good/bad?
  45. 45. 45  What struck you about that?  How do those fit together?  How might it have been different?  Do you see something operating there?  What does that suggest to you about yourself/your group?  What do you understand better about yourself/your group?
  46. 46. 46 Abstraction (Integration)  Describes the generalization that will/can be derived from the Activity and Analysis
  47. 47. 47 In this portion, theory input(s), lecturettes, or other activities may be included to explain or recapitulate the various concepts covered in the learning episode.
  48. 48. Processing Questions 48 Questions are directed toward prompting generalizations:  What might we draw/pull from that?  Is that plugging in to anything?  What did you learn/relearn?
  49. 49. 49  What does that suggest to you about ______ in general?  Does that remind you of anything?  What principles/law do you see operating?
  50. 50. 50  Does that remind you of anything? What does that help explain?  How does this relate to other experiences?  What do you associate with that?  So what?
  51. 51. 51 Application (Practical Synthesis)  Provides activities which will enable participant-learners to transfer concepts learned to real life situations.
  52. 52. 52 Provides mechanisms by which learner is able to evaluate his/her attainment of the instrumental (learning content) and the terminal (behavioral) objectives.
  53. 53. 53  These may include the following:  Action plans  Assignments  Evaluation activities/ instruments to check understanding of/commitment to the learning outcome
  54. 54. Processing Questions Questions are directed towards applying the general knowledge they have gained to their personal and/or professional lives. 54
  55. 55. 55  How could you apply/transfer that?  What would you like to do with that?  How could you repeat this?  What could you do to hold on to that?
  56. 56. 56 What are the options? What might you do to help/hinder yourself? How could you make it better?
  57. 57. 57  What would be the consequences of doing/not doing that?  What modifications can you make work for you?  What could you imagine/ fantasize about that?
  58. 58. 58 A final stage can be added here, that of processing the entire experience as a learning experience. Questions are aimed at soliciting feedback.  How was this for you?  What were the pluses/minuses?
  59. 59. 59  How might it have been more meaningful?  What changes would you make?  What would you continue?
  60. 60. 60  If you had to do it over again, what would you do?  What additions/deletions would help?  Any suggestions?
  61. 61. 61 Attitude Portrait of a Facilitator of Learning  Realness  the most basic  real person  no front or facade
  62. 62. 62  Prizing, acceptance, trust  prizing each participant  respect for worth of individual
  63. 63. 63  Empathic understanding  standing in the participants shoes  making participants feel understood not judged or evaluated
  64. 64. 64 “At last someone understands how it feels and seems to be me without to analyze or judge me. Now I can blossom, grow and learn.”
  65. 65. 65 Creating Exemplary Learning Experiences 1. Plan ahead; 2. Set expectations; 3. Organize your materials; 4. Use visuals
  66. 66. 66 5. Plan for breaks; 6. Review the main concepts; 7. Make an impact at the end; 8. Provide snacks 9. Have fun!
  67. 67. 67 Presentation skills, tools and techniques
  68. 68. 68 Presenting Styles Why is it important to be aware of your presenting style?
  69. 69. 69 • It affects the learners.
  70. 70. 70 • It can encourage the use of a variety of teaching techniques.
  71. 71. 71 • It enables acceptance of those who are different from you.
  72. 72. 72 Learning Environment How can a trainer create a learning environment that helps adults learn?
  73. 73. 73 • Set ground rules; • Encourage participation; • Facilitate more than lecture.
  74. 74. 74 Handling Difficult Participants Effectively • Remain calm • Give the person a task to do • Ask for others in class to respond • Ignore
  75. 75. 75 Presentation Behaviors Verbal  Pitch, volume, speech rate;  Emphasize key points;  Avoid um, uh, er.
  76. 76. 76 Visual  Appearance;  Mannerisms. Scan for Learning Reactions  Are they asleep?  Do they look puzzled?
  77. 77. 77 Overcoming Difficulties Use planned questions and ask them more often. Allow more time. * Learners must think through questions, then compose a coherent sentence or paragraph.
  78. 78. 78 Providing Games
  79. 79. 79 Have Fun Learning does not have to be painful. Work at exciting the “child” that lives in all of us.
  80. 80. 80 More fun for you, as a trainer, as well as for participants, if your “child” is involved.
  81. 81. 81 Learning will be hindered if the attention of participants is limited.
  82. 82. 82 Time Know your limits in terms of realizing your goals. Consider the following questions:
  83. 83. 83 A. How much time are you allotted? B. Are you building in breaks? C. Are you building in time for reflecting and integrating?
  84. 84. 84 D. Are you taking into account slippage (what you may not anticipate can still happen!)
  85. 85. 85 Evaluation Paying attention to the “energy levels” of the participants and yourself will help you evaluate the training while it is still in progress and at its conclusion.
  86. 86. 86 You may make the last- minute changes throughout the experience according to your ongoing evaluations.
  87. 87. 87 Concluding evaluations serve the dual purpose of giving the trainer feedback and helping participants integrate what they have learned. A. Ongoing Evaluations B. Concluding Evaluations
  88. 88. 88 Final Touch
  89. 89. 89
  90. 90. 90
  91. 91. 91
  92. 92. 92
  93. 93. 93
  94. 94. 94  Elements of Greatness  Video developed by Profiles International, Inc.
  95. 95. 95
  1. A particular slide catching your eye?

    Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

×