Online action in reading ellis

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  • I like that you had so many examples for the students to identify and discuss throughout the story. Well done. Yvette
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  • It was a great idea to define the keywords before the reading.
    Reginald
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  • Mary Anne, you incorporated the common core standards for 5-7 extremely well into your literature.
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  • Very good power point with great instruction in figurative language. It is a very abstract concept to master and therefore a hard concept for students to understand but I believe you did a great job breaking it down. Also the transcript was a great to include.

    Taylirre Mack
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  • I really enjoyed your story about the farm in Kentucky. The pictures were great. I like how you differentiated between metaphors and similes. I think your students will enjoy learning figurative language through the examples you provided in the book.

    Diana Neller
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  • 1. Online Action in Reading A Day At The Farm Mary Anne Ellis RED 6545
  • 2. Figurative Writing • What does it mean to write figuratively? – (to write creatively, to think abstractly, to compare two things that are different but have something in common) • What does it mean to be literal? – (to say what you mean precisely) • Consider the following… My love for you is as deep as the ocean. I love you very much. – Which one is more powerful? Why? – Which one can you see?
  • 3. Figurative Writing • Similes - A figure of speech that explicitly compares two things usually considered different. Similes are introduced by like or as. • “The realization hit me like a ton of bricks.” • “She is as playful as a kitten.”
  • 4. Figurative Writing • Metaphor- a figure of speech in which a term or phrase is applied to something to which it is not literally applicable in order to suggest a resemblance. • “You will be blown away.” • “Your room is a pigsty.”
  • 5. Figurative Writing • Onomatopoeia - the formation of a word such as, cuckoo, meow, honk, or boom, by imitation of a sound. Different types of sounds to consider: – Animal sounds – Sounds of air – Collision sounds • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • cuckoo hiss meow moo neigh oink purr Quack Gasp Swish Swoosh Whiff Whoosh Bang Clap
  • 6. Your Turn… • I have butterflies in my stomach. • Gentle as a lamb • Brave as a lion • Happy as a ______ • Playful as a ______ • Bright as a ______ • Listen for the figurative language in the following story. Give a thumbs up when you hear figurative language.
  • 7. A Day At The Farm Madge’s mom came knocking at her bedroom door. KNOCK! KNOCK! KNOCK! It was before the crack of dawn and time to get moving. Madge turned to wake up, moving as slow as molasses. • • • • • Q: What does it mean “the crack of dawn”? Can you think of other expressions of time? (Time is money. Time flies. Killin’ time.) Q: Is Madge a morning person? How do you know? Q: What onomatopoeia expressions do you hear?
  • 8. A Day At The Farm “It’s time to rise and shine,” said Mom. “Today is your trip to the country. We need to get dressed and eat breakfast, lickety split.” Those words were music to Madge’s ears. She quickly changed her tune, and began moving as fast as a cheetah. Snip. Snap. She was ready in no time. • • • • • Q: What was music to her ears? How does she feel? Q: What metaphors do you hear? (A: Changed her tune) What simile do you hear? (A: As fast as a cheetah)
  • 9. A Day At The Farm Madge heard about the country, but she had not been there yet. This was a first for Madge, and she was beaming with excitement. “You will have the time of your life,” promised Grandpa. Q: What metaphors do you hear? Q: Have you ever been to the country? If you have, did it look like this?
  • 10. A Day At The Farm They drove through the hills of Kentucky. Honk! Honk! The semi trucks roared, and country music danced across the airwaves. The drive was as pretty as a picture. The mountains full of rocks and trees. Madge was excited about the day ahead. She was busting at the seams. Q: What onomatopoeia expressions do you hear? Q: What use of metaphor and simile do you hear?
  • 11. A Day At The Farm Uncle John and Aunt Ida were waiting as Madge and her Grandpa arrived. Family was very important to Madge. So, this trip was special. Uncle John and Aunt Ida greeted Madge with hugs. “Come in,” said Aunt Ida. “I made some strawberry cobbler for you. The strawberries are fresh from the garden.” Madge was in heaven! Q: What metaphors do you hear?
  • 12. A Day At The Farm They ate cobbler, and Madge said excitedly, “I can’t wait to see the animals!” Uncle John asked, “Madge, how would you like to be my helper today? Would you help me milk the cows?” Madge excitedly jumped up, “Yes! I’d love to see the cows and milk them.“ She was as happy as a clam! Q: What similes do you hear?
  • 13. A Day At The Farm Together, they walked through the field to the barn. The cows brayed, “Moo.” The chickens clacked, “cock-doodle-doo,” and the horses brayed, “neigh” as they walked by. In the barn, Uncle John said, “Now be careful, Madge. We don’t want to startle the animals. They get spooked easily.” Q: What expressions of onomatopoeia do you hear? Q: What other forms of onomatopoeia would you hear on a farm? (A: oink oink)
  • 14. A Day At The Farm Madge listened to her Uncle. She talked softly and was careful not to move too suddenly. Uncle John showed Madge how to milk a cow. “Hold the utter, and pull and squeeze,” whispered Uncle John. Madge was milking the cows. “Now Madge, come with me,” said Uncle John. Q: How does Madge feel about milking a cow? How do you know?
  • 15. A Day At The Farm “Let’s get the eggs from the chickens.” Madge followed her Uncle and together they gathered eggs. She took the eggs into the house to her aunt. She looked forward to eating the tasty brown eggs. Q: Have you seen brown eggs in the store? Q: Why are some eggs white and some are brown?
  • 16. A Day At The Farm Madge sat with her Uncle and Grandpa, as Uncle John told her stories about the farm animals and living on the farm. She listened intently and thought, ‘he is definitely as wise as an owl.’ Madge enjoyed the peacefulness of the farm. It was a slice of heaven. Q:What metaphors do you hear? Q: What similes?
  • 17. A Day At The Farm As quiet as a mouse, Madge walked around the barn. Looking at the animals, the horses, the farm cats, the pigs, and the cows; she thought to herself, ‘this place has a special place in my heart.’ Q: Describe what kind of day Madge is having? Q: How does she feel about the farm and the farm animals? How do you know?
  • 18. A Day At The Farm Soon it was time to go home. Madge and her Grandpa prepared to leave. As Madge reflected on her day with her Aunt and Uncle, she thought to herself, ‘you are the sun in my sky.’ Q: How does Madge feel about her Aunt and Uncle? Q: How did this experience affect Madge?
  • 19. A Day At The Farm Madge was glad she was able to spend time with family. She thought it was good to see where she came from; to know where she wanted to go. Madge went home knowing her heart was in Kentucky. Q:What metaphors do you hear? Q: Does Madge like Kentucky? How do you know?
  • 20. Your Turn! Think of a place that is special to you: The beach, a baseball game, the park, Grandpa’s house. Write a description of it using metaphor, simile, and onomatopoeia.
  • 21. Let’s Review • What is the difference between a metaphor and a simile? • What is onomatopoeia?
  • 22. • Similes - A figure of speech that explicitly compares two things usually considered different. Similes are introduced by like or as.
  • 23. • Metaphor- a figure of speech in which a term or phrase is applied to something to which it is not literally applicable in order to suggest a resemblance.
  • 24. • Onomatopoeia - the formation of a word such as, cuckoo, meow, honk, or boom, by imitation of a sound. Different types of sounds to consider: • Animal sounds • Sounds of air • Collision sounds
  • 25. Common Core State Standards 5th – 7th Grades • • • • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.5.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative language such as metaphors and similes. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.5.5 Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings. – CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.5.5a Interpret figurative language, including similes and metaphors, in context. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.6.5 Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings. – CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.6.5a Interpret figures of speech (e.g., personification) in context. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.5 Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings. – CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.7.5a Interpret figures of speech
  • 26. CCSS Speaking and Listening 5th- 7th Grades – CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.5.1c Pose and respond to specific questions by making comments that contribute to the discussion and elaborate on the remarks of others. – CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.5.1d Review the key ideas expressed and draw conclusions in light of information and knowledge gained from the discussions. – CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.6.1c Pose and respond to specific questions with elaboration and detail by making comments that contribute to the topic, text, or issue under discussion. – CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.6.1d Review the key ideas expressed and demonstrate understanding of multiple perspectives through reflection and paraphrasing. – CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.7.1c Pose questions that elicit elaboration and respond to others’ questions and comments with relevant observations and ideas that bring the discussion back on topic as needed. – CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.7.1d Acknowledge new information expressed by others and, when warranted, modify their own views
  • 27. References • http://dictionary.reference.com/ • http://www.corestandards.org/ELALiteracy/SL/6 • Photos courtesy of Karen Ellis