Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
HIPAA Omnibus Rule for Business Associates
HIPAA Omnibus Rule for Business Associates
HIPAA Omnibus Rule for Business Associates
HIPAA Omnibus Rule for Business Associates
HIPAA Omnibus Rule for Business Associates
HIPAA Omnibus Rule for Business Associates
HIPAA Omnibus Rule for Business Associates
HIPAA Omnibus Rule for Business Associates
HIPAA Omnibus Rule for Business Associates
HIPAA Omnibus Rule for Business Associates
HIPAA Omnibus Rule for Business Associates
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

HIPAA Omnibus Rule for Business Associates

1,164

Published on

Basic information regarding the changes in HIPAA that will become effective in Mar 2013. This presentation is designed as an introduction to Business Associates.

Basic information regarding the changes in HIPAA that will become effective in Mar 2013. This presentation is designed as an introduction to Business Associates.

Published in: Health & Medicine
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,164
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 ( HIPAA ; Pub.L. 104-191 , 110  Stat.  1936, enacted August 21, 1996) was enacted by the United States Congress and signed by President Bill Clinton in 1996. It was sponsored by Sen. Nancy Kassebaum (R-Kan.). Title I of HIPAA protects health insurance coverage for workers and their families when they change or lose their jobs. Title II of HIPAA, known as the Administrative Simplification (AS) provisions, requires the establishment of national standards for electronic health care transactions and national identifiers for providers, health insurance plans, and employers
  • The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA), Public Law 104-191, included Administrative Simplification (AS) provisions (Title II) that required national standards for electronic health care transactions and code sets, unique health identifiers, and security. AS also covered the areas of Privacy, Security, Enforcement and Electronic Transactions. The Privacy Rule set national standards for the protection of individually identifiable health information while the security rule emphasized the protections of information in electronic format. The enforcement rule established the procedures and penalties in case of unauthorized releases.
  • The term "covered entity" under the HIPAA Privacy Rule refers to three specific groups, including health plans, health care clearinghouses, and health care providers that transmit health information electronically.  Covered entities under the HIPAA Privacy Rule must comply with the Rule's requirements for safeguarding the privacy of protected health information.  Below is a more detailed list of those who fall under the covered entity category under HIPAA. Health Care Providers This includes all health care providers, regardless of practice size, provided that they transmit health information electronically.  The specific electronic transactions subject to this rule are those that are covered under the HIPAA Transactions Rule.  Providers subject to the Privacy rule include:       o Doctors,       o Clinics,       o Psychologists,       o Dentists,       o Chiropractors,       o Nursing Homes, and,       o Pharmacies. Health Plans Medical, Dental, and Vision Plans HMOs Medicare and Medicaid Medicare+Choice and Medicare Supplement Insurers Long-Term Care Insurers (excluding nursing home fixed-indemnity policies) Veterans Health Plans Company Health Plans Exceptions include:    o A group health plan with less than 50 participants that is  administered solely by the employer that established and maintains the plan is not a covered entity;    o Government-funded programs whose principal purpose is not providing or paying the cost of health care;     o Government-funded programs whose principal activity is directly providing health care or the making of grants to fund the direct provision of health care; and,    o Certain types of insurance entities such as those providing only workers' compensation, automobile insurance, and property and casualty insurance. Health Care Clearinghouses Entities that process nonstandard health information they receive from another entity into a standard (i.e., standard electronic format or data content), or vice versa.  This includes: o Billing Services, o Repricing Companies, o Community Health Management Information Systems, and, o Value-added networks and switches if these entities perform clearinghouse functions.
  • Amendments to the Enforcement Rule: Increased Penalties and Fewer Defenses Even for covered entities that have long been subject directly to HIPAA regulations, the stakes will now be higher. The HITECH Act raised the maximum penalty for HIPAA violations to $50,000 per violation and $1.5 million for a group of identical violations. 31 These increased penalties will now apply to violations by covered entities and business associates alike. The revised Enforcement Rule limits the affirmative defenses available to an entity that violates HIPAA. A complete defense is available only if the violation was not due to willful neglect and was corrected within thirty days of when the entity knew, or by exercising “reasonable diligence” would have known, of the violation. This means that an entity’s reasonable lack of knowledge of a violation, alone, will no longer constitute a complete defense, which it had in the past. Moreover, an employee or business associate’s knowledge of a violation may be imputed to a covered entity. In addition, business associates will become directly liable for their breaches. HIPAA requires BAAs to provide that business associates must notify the covered entity upon discovery of any violation. The new rules also make business associates directly liable for the failure to provide such notice. A covered entity or business associate is non-compliant if it knows “of a pattern of activity or practice of [its business associate or subcontractor] that constituted a material breach or violation of the [BAA],” unless the superior either took “reasonable steps” to cure the breach or end the arrangement. 8 Even when a subordinate’s potentially violative activity is not known, the supervising authority may be liable for the violation if the subordinate was acting as the “agent” of the covered entity or business associate. 39
  • Transcript

    • 1. Taino Consultants Inc. Dr. Jose I. Delgadowww.TainoConsultants.com Tel 904-794-7830
    • 2.  Title I Portability: guarantees health coverage when employees change jobs Title II Accountability: Also known as the Administrative Simplification establishes National Standards for the protection of health data ◦ Privacy ◦ Security ◦ Enforcement ◦ Electronic Transactions
    • 3.  Covered Entity: refers to three specific groups that normally transmit health information electronically: ◦ health care providers ◦ health plans ◦ health care clearinghouses Business Associate: Person/agency who performs a function or activity for or on behalf of a covered entity that involves the use of patient information
    • 4. Addresses a number of rules and incorporates them intoitself as the definitive requirements for compliance.1. Implemented changes to HIPAA that were mandated by the 2009 Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act (HITECH);2. Finalized the 2009 Enforcement and Breach Notification Interim Final Rules; and3. Modified HIPAAs Privacy Rule to strengthen the protections for genetic information required under the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008 (GINA).
    • 5.  Business Associate definition expanded to include any entity that creates, receives, maintains or transmits PHI on behalf of a Covered Entity or an organized health care arrangement. Broadened the definition of Business Associate to include any downstream subcontractors of Business Associates Liability and compliance rules expanded to include BA and its subcontractors
    • 6. “All those entities that create, receive, maintain, or transmit PHI on behalf of a covered entity.” ◦ Data storage company that stores physical or electronic data; ◦ Software vendors ◦ Insurance sales agents and vendors ◦ Professionals (lawyers, consultants, lawyers) “It is what you do, not what you call yourself, that determines whether you are a Business Associate”
    • 7. Civil Penalties
    • 8.  Analyze whether you are now considered Business Associates; Assess whether your subcontractors/vendors are considered Business Associates; Conduct audits and gap analysis; Revise/Implement Policies and Procedures; Revise/Implement Agreements; Train employees.
    • 9.  Posted in Federal Register: Jan 25, 2013 Effective date: March 26,2013 Compliance date: September 23, 2013
    • 10.  Do not delay actions Enforcement date is Sep 2013 ◦ Compliance steps may take over 6 months If in doubt consult an expertDr. Jose I. Delgado is the President and CEO of Taino Consultants Inc.,consulting firm that focuses on healthcare business start-ups, compliance andoperations. Dr. Delgado can be contacted atDrDelgado@TainoConsultants.com.

    ×