Chapter 9: Elections,Campaigns, and Voting  A More Perfect Union 1/e
Elections, Campaigns, and              Voting• Civic Engagement and Political  Participation  – Voting  – Volunteering  – ...
Elections, Campaigns, and              Voting• Elections in the United States  – Nominations and Primary Elections     • T...
Elections, Campaigns, and               Voting• Elections in the United States (continued)  – The 2000 Election and Its Im...
Elections, Campaigns, and              Voting• Running for Office: The Choice to Run  – Formal Eligibility Requirements  –...
Elections, Campaigns, and              Voting• The Nature of Campaigns Today  – The Professionalism of Political Campaigns...
Elections, Campaigns, and              Voting• Regulating Campaign Contributions  – Regulatory Loopholes: Independent    E...
©2011, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved.   8
©2011, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved.   9
Elections, Campaigns, and              Voting• Presidential Campaigns  – Party Conventions and the General Election    Cam...
©2011, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved.   11
Elections, Campaigns, and              Voting• Who Votes? Factors in Voter Participation  – Education Level—the Number one...
©2011, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved.   13
Elections, Campaigns, and              Voting• How Voters Decide  – Major Factors in Voter Decision Making    • Party Iden...
©2011, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved.   15
Elections, Campaigns, and              Voting• Why Some People Do Not Vote  – Lack of Efficacy  – Voter Fatigue and Negati...
Chapter Three  Elections
Exhibit 3-1      Qualified Political Parties in California                                                                ...
Expenditures in StateExhibit 3-2Assembly Campaigns: 1976-1998Incumbents significantly outspend challengers
Expenditures in StateExhibit 3-2Assembly Campaigns: 1976-1998Winners outspend losers
Exhibit 3-3     The top 20 contributors to candidates, party committees,     and/or ballot measure committees accounted fo...
Exhibit 3-3     The top 20 contributors to candidates, party committees,     and/or ballot measure committees accounted fo...
Exhibit 3-3     The top 20 contributors to candidates, party committees,     and/or ballot measure committees accounted fo...
Exhibit 3-3     The top 20 contributors to candidates, party committees,     and/or ballot measure committees accounted fo...
Exhibit 3-3     The top 20 contributors to candidates, party committees,     and/or ballot measure committees accounted fo...
Exhibit 3-4 California Campaign Contribution Limits                                                                       ...
Exhibit 3-5   California Voter Participation by Race/Ethnicity 2004
Exhibit 3-5   California Voter Participation by Age 2004
Exhibit 3-5   California Voter Participation by Education
Exhibit 3-5   California Voter Participation by Income
Exhibit 3-6Voter Participation: Percent of Eligible PopulationVoting in General Elections
Exhibit 3-7California’s Coastal-Inland Political Divide
Exhibit 3-7November 2006 Gubernatorial Election
Exhibit 3-7November 2004 Presidential Election
Exhibit 3-7October 2003 Special Election:Shall Gray Davis be Recalled?
Exhibit 3-7November 2002 Gubernatorial Election
Exhibit 3-7November 2000 Presidential Election
Exhibit 3-7November 1998 Gubernatorial Election
Diminishing Democrat-RepublicanExhibit 3-8Registration and Growth of Independents
Exhibit 3-9   Growing Latino Electorate
Exhibit 3-10Increasing Absentee Voting
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Chapter 9 & 3

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Chapter 9 & 3

  1. 1. Chapter 9: Elections,Campaigns, and Voting A More Perfect Union 1/e
  2. 2. Elections, Campaigns, and Voting• Civic Engagement and Political Participation – Voting – Volunteering – Running for Office ©2011, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 2
  3. 3. Elections, Campaigns, and Voting• Elections in the United States – Nominations and Primary Elections • Types of Primary Elections • Presidential Primaries – General Elections – Referendum, Initiative, and Recall – The Act of Voting ©2011, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 3
  4. 4. Elections, Campaigns, and Voting• Elections in the United States (continued) – The 2000 Election and Its Impact – Types of Ballots – Why Ballot Design Matters – Voting by Mail ©2011, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 4
  5. 5. Elections, Campaigns, and Voting• Running for Office: The Choice to Run – Formal Eligibility Requirements – Informal Eligibility Requirements ©2011, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 5
  6. 6. Elections, Campaigns, and Voting• The Nature of Campaigns Today – The Professionalism of Political Campaigns – Media and New Technologies: Transforming Political Campaigns • Personality versus Policy • Revolutionizing the Campaign: The Internet – Money and Modern Campaigns ©2011, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 6
  7. 7. Elections, Campaigns, and Voting• Regulating Campaign Contributions – Regulatory Loopholes: Independent Expenditures – Regulatory Loopholes: Soft Money – The Impact of Regulation: The Growth of PACs – The Bipartisan Campaign Finance Reform Act of 2002 – Regulatory Loophole: 527s ©2011, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 7
  8. 8. ©2011, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 8
  9. 9. ©2011, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 9
  10. 10. Elections, Campaigns, and Voting• Presidential Campaigns – Party Conventions and the General Election Campaign – The Electoral College ©2011, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 10
  11. 11. ©2011, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 11
  12. 12. Elections, Campaigns, and Voting• Who Votes? Factors in Voter Participation – Education Level—the Number one Predictor of Voting – The Age Factor – Race and Voter Participation – Income—a Reliable Predictor of Voting – Party Competitiveness and Voter Turnout ©2011, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 12
  13. 13. ©2011, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 13
  14. 14. Elections, Campaigns, and Voting• How Voters Decide – Major Factors in Voter Decision Making • Party Identification • Policy Priorities • Incumbency – Campaign Influences on Voter Choice • Greater Reliance on Paid Professional Staffers • Negative Campaigning ©2011, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 14
  15. 15. ©2011, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 15
  16. 16. Elections, Campaigns, and Voting• Why Some People Do Not Vote – Lack of Efficacy – Voter Fatigue and Negative Campaigns – The Structure of Elections – The Rational Abstention Thesis – The Impact of Nonvoting ©2011, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 16
  17. 17. Chapter Three Elections
  18. 18. Exhibit 3-1 Qualified Political Parties in California Percent of Qualified party Website registered voters* Democratic www.cadem.org 42.5% Republican www.cagop.org 34.3% American Independent www.aipca.org 2.0% Green www.cagreens.org 0.9% Libertarian www.ca.lp.org 0.5% Peace and Freedom www.peaceandfreedom.org 0.4% Natural Law www.natural-law.org 0.1% Other 0.5% Decline to state 18.7%* Does not total exactly 100% due to rounding.15,837,108 registered voters in October 2006 — 70% of the 22,652,190 Californians eligible to vote.Source: California Secretary of State
  19. 19. Expenditures in StateExhibit 3-2Assembly Campaigns: 1976-1998Incumbents significantly outspend challengers
  20. 20. Expenditures in StateExhibit 3-2Assembly Campaigns: 1976-1998Winners outspend losers
  21. 21. Exhibit 3-3 The top 20 contributors to candidates, party committees, and/or ballot measure committees accounted for 29 percent of the total contributions in 2004 election cycle. Interest Group, Policy or Amount to Amount to Contributor Name Candidate Supported or Ballot Candidates Opposed, and Outcome MeasuresAgua Caliente Band of Tribal Government $688,650 $13,700,000Cahuilla Indians Pro Proposition 70 (lost)California State Public Sector UnionCouncil of Service Pro Proposition 56 (lost) $1,014,315 $12,818,278Employees Pro Proposition 72 (lost)International Union Political Party CommitteeCalifornia Democratic Largest recipients were $11,413,588 $1,010,525Party Michael Machado (won) and Peg Pinard (lost)San Manuel Band of Tribal Government $955,520 $11,000,000Mission Indians Pro Proposition 70 (lost)
  22. 22. Exhibit 3-3 The top 20 contributors to candidates, party committees, and/or ballot measure committees accounted for 29 percent of the total contributions in 2004 election cycle. Interest Group, Policy or Amount to Amount to Candidate Supported or Ballot Contributor Name Candidates Opposed, and Outcome Measures Public Sector UnionCalifornia Teachers Pro Proposition 55 (won) $1,838,925 $8,620,336Association Pro Proposition 56 (lost) Pro Proposition 72 (lost)Schwarzenegger’s Candidate CommitteeCalifornia Recovery Pro Proposition 57 (won) $0 $10,178,721Team, Governor Con Proposition 68 (lost) Tribal GovernmentMorongo Band of Pro Proposition 70 (lost) $1,251,600 $8,334,600Mission Indians Con Proposition 68 (lost) Tribal GovernmentAuburn Rancheria $83,800 $8,285,047 Con Proposition 68 (lost)
  23. 23. Exhibit 3-3 The top 20 contributors to candidates, party committees, and/or ballot measure committees accounted for 29 percent of the total contributions in 2004 election cycle. Interest Group, Policy or Amount to Amount to Candidate Supported or Ballot Contributor Name Candidates Opposed, and Outcome MeasuresRumsey Band of Tribal Government $97,000 $8,244,241Wintun Indians Con Proposition 68 (lost) Political Party Committee Largest recipients wereCalifornia Republican Gary Podesto (lost), Dean $6,314,060 $1,374,528Party Gardner (lost), and Shirley Horton (won)Pala Band of Mission Tribal Government $47,300 $6,693,293Indians Con Proposition 68 (lost)Pechanga Band of Tribal Government $498,004 $5,571,142Luiseno Indians Con Proposition 68 (lost)
  24. 24. Exhibit 3-3 The top 20 contributors to candidates, party committees, and/or ballot measure committees accounted for 29 percent of the total contributions in 2004 election cycle. Interest Group, Policy or Amount to Amount to Candidate Supported or Ballot Contributor Name Candidates Opposed, and Outcome MeasuresCalifornia Motor Car Automotive $453,456 $5,304,911Dealers Association Pro Proposition 64 Candidate self-financePoizner Family Trust Republican candidate 21st $5,313,732 $0 Assembly (lost)Magna Entertainment Gambling & Casinos $54,200 $4,800,008Corp Pro Proposition 68 (lost) Telephone UtilitiesSBC Communications $558,874 $4,181,776 Con Proposition 67 (lost)
  25. 25. Exhibit 3-3 The top 20 contributors to candidates, party committees, and/or ballot measure committees accounted for 29 percent of the total contributions in 2004 election cycle. Interest Group, Policy or Amount to Amount to Candidate Supported or Ballot Contributor Name Candidates Opposed, and Outcome Measures Hospitals & Nursing HomesCalifornia Healthcare Pro Proposition 67 (lost) $354,276 $3,978,835Association Pro Proposition 72 (lost) Pro Proposition 63 (won)Viejas Band of Tribal Government $334,620 $3,302,426Kumeyaay Indians Con Proposition 68 (lost) Gambling & CasinosPinnacle Entertainment $2,000 $3,414,000 Pro Proposition 68 (lost)League of California Government $0 $3,109,888Cities Pro Proposition 1A (won)
  26. 26. Exhibit 3-4 California Campaign Contribution Limits From To Small Candidate Candidate (to self) Political Action Reg’d Political Individual Contribution (to another Committee Lobbyist Party Contribution Loan Committee candidate) Candidate State legislative $3,300/election** $3,300/election $6,700/election $0 No limit $3,300/election No limit $100,000 Governor* $22,300/election $22,300/election $22,300/election $0 No limit Other statewide $5,600/election $5,600/election $11,100/election $0 No limit Political Action $5,600/year -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Committee Small Contribution $200/year -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Committee Political Party $27,900/year $27,900/year -- -- -- -- -- -- Ballot Measure No limit -- -- -- No limit -- -- CommitteeSource: State of California, Fair Political Practices Commission.
  27. 27. Exhibit 3-5 California Voter Participation by Race/Ethnicity 2004
  28. 28. Exhibit 3-5 California Voter Participation by Age 2004
  29. 29. Exhibit 3-5 California Voter Participation by Education
  30. 30. Exhibit 3-5 California Voter Participation by Income
  31. 31. Exhibit 3-6Voter Participation: Percent of Eligible PopulationVoting in General Elections
  32. 32. Exhibit 3-7California’s Coastal-Inland Political Divide
  33. 33. Exhibit 3-7November 2006 Gubernatorial Election
  34. 34. Exhibit 3-7November 2004 Presidential Election
  35. 35. Exhibit 3-7October 2003 Special Election:Shall Gray Davis be Recalled?
  36. 36. Exhibit 3-7November 2002 Gubernatorial Election
  37. 37. Exhibit 3-7November 2000 Presidential Election
  38. 38. Exhibit 3-7November 1998 Gubernatorial Election
  39. 39. Diminishing Democrat-RepublicanExhibit 3-8Registration and Growth of Independents
  40. 40. Exhibit 3-9 Growing Latino Electorate
  41. 41. Exhibit 3-10Increasing Absentee Voting
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