princess P56

2,471 views
2,196 views

Published on

manual de usuario de princess p56

Published in: Business, Sports
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
2,471
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
26
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
70
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

princess P56

  1. 1. Owner’s Handbook Princess 56
  2. 2. PRINCESS 56 OWNER’S HANDBOOK THE OWNER’S HANDBOOK This owner’s handbook has been compiled to help you to operate your craft with safety and pleasure. It contains details of the craft; the equipment supplied or fitted, its systems and information on their operation. Please read it carefully, and familiarize yourself with the craft before using it. This owner's manual is not a course on boating safety or seamanship. If this is your first craft, or if you are changing to a type of craft you are not familiar with, for your own comfort and safety, please ensure that you obtain handling and operating experience before ‘assuming command’ of the craft. Your dealer or national sailing federation or yacht club will be pleased to advise you of local sea schools, or competent instructors. Ensure that the anticipated wind and sea conditions will correspond to the design category of your craft, and that you and your crew are able to handle the craft in these conditions. Even when your boat is categorized for them, the sea and wind conditions corresponding to the design categories A, B and C range from severe storm conditions for category A, to strong conditions for the top of category C, open to the hazards of a freak wave or gust. These are therefore dangerous conditions, where only a competent, fit and trained crew using a well maintained craft can satisfactorily operate. This owner's handbook is not a detailed maintenance or trouble-shooting guide. In the case of difficulty, refer to the boat builder or his representative. If a maintenance manual is provided, use it for the craft's maintenance. Always use trained and competent people for maintenance, fixing or modifications. Modifications that may affect the safety characteristics of the craft shall be assessed, executed and documented by competent people. The boat builder cannot be held responsible for modifications that he has not approved. In some countries, a driving licence or authorization are required, or specific regulations are in force. Always maintain your craft properly and make allowance for the deterioration that will occur in time and as a result of heavy use or misuse of the craft. Any craft, no matter how strong it may be, can be severely damaged if not used properly. This is not compatible with safe boating. Always adjust the speed and direction of the craft to sea conditions. If your craft is fitted with a liferaft, carefully read its operating manual. The craft should have onboard the appropriate safety equipment (lifejackets, harness, etcetera.) according to the type of craft, weather conditions, etc. This equipment is mandatory in some countries. The crew should be familiar with the use of all safety equipment and emergency manoeuvring (man overboard recovery, towing, etcetera.), sailing schools and clubs regularly organize drill sessions. All persons should wear a suitable buoyancy aid (life jacket/personal floatation device) when on deck. Note that, in some countries, it is a legal requirement to wear a buoyancy aid that complies with their national regulations at all times. PLEASE KEEP THIS OWNER’S HANDBOOK IN A SECURE PLACE, AND HAND IT OVER TO THE NEW OWNER WHEN YOU SELL THE YACHT 724994 - ISSUE B - 07/13 1
  3. 3. PRINCESS 56 OWNER’S HANDBOOK 2 724994 - ISSUE B - 07/13
  4. 4. PRINCESS 56 OWNER’S HANDBOOK TABLE OF CONTENTS THE OWNER’S HANDBOOK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 TABLE OF CONTENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Warning Labels Used Onboard 9 Design, Construction and Compliance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Compliance with the European Union Recreational Craft Directive 9 Homologation, Certifications, Builder’s Plate, Design Category and Identification 9 Health and Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14 General Safety 14 Man-overboard Recovery 15 Good Seamanship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15 Before Putting to Sea 15 Yacht Speed and Visibility 15 Towing / Under Tow 15 Provision of Distress, Lifesaving and Safety Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 Navigational Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 Magnetic Steering Compasses 17 Multifunctional Instruments 18 Dual Station Autopilot 18 Horns and Twin-Beam Searchlight 19 VHF DSC Radiotelephones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19 Electro Magnetic Compliance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20 Fire-Fighting Equipment and Fire Prevention . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20 Fire-Fighting Equipment 20 Aftersales Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23 Policy 23 Warranty Assistance 23 Warranty Agreement 23 Warranty Registration 24 Registration Details . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Commissioning Princess Distributor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25 Insurance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25 1. 1.1 1.2 1.3 DECK EQUIPMENT AND BELOW DECKS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27 On Deck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27 1.2.1 Deck Fittings / Equipment and Safe Working Deck Areas 27 1.2.2 Anchor Windlass and Anchoring 27 1.2.3 Bathing Platform and Boarding Ladders 34 1.2.4 Windscreen, Wipers and Screenwash 34 Below Decks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35 1.3.1 Accommodation in General 35 1.3.2 Galley, Refrigeration and Food Preparation Equipment 35 1.3.3 Hull Windows 37 1.3.4 Helm Windows 38 1.3.5 Domestic and Navigation Lighting 38 1.3.6 Audiovisual Equipment 38 724994 - ISSUE B - 07/13 3
  5. 5. PRINCESS 56 OWNER’S HANDBOOK 1.4 Environmental Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38 1.4.1 Discharge and Disposal of Waste Materials 38 2. 2.1 2.2 MAIN ENGINES, CONTROLS, INSTRUMENTATION AND ALLIED EQUIPMENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41 Main Engine System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41 2.2.1 Lubrication and Consumables 41 2.2.2 Air System 42 2.2.3 Fuel System 42 2.2.4 Cooling System 46 2.2.5 Exhaust System 48 2.2.6 Engine Electrics 48 Controls and Instrumentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51 2.3.1 Throttle Controls 51 2.3.2 Instrumentation 52 2.3.3 Ancillary Controls and Equipment 54 2.3.4 Stopcocks and Seacocks 57 Engine Room and Lazarette . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57 2.4.1 Engine Room and Lazarette Layouts 57 2.4.2 Engine Room and Lazarette Ventilation System 57 2.4.3 Automatic Fire Control System 67 Sterngear, Shafts and Shaft Seals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68 2.5.1 Sterngear 68 2.5.2 Shafts and Shaft Seals 68 Cathodic Protection System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69 Operation of the Main Engines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69 2.7.1 Before Starting 69 2.7.2 Starting 71 2.7.3 Stopping 73 2.7.4 Running-In 73 2.7.5 Overheating 73 Yacht Handling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73 2.8.1 Trim Tabs 73 2.8.2 Bow Thruster 74 Environmental Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74 2.9.1 Fuel Oil Spillages 74 2.9.2 Exhaust Emissions 74 2.9.3 Wake Wash 75 2.9.4 Noise Pollution 75 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 2.7 2.8 2.9 3. 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6 3.7 4 ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .77 Electrical Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .77 Electrical Wiring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .80 Miniature Circuit Breakers and Electrical Switch / Distribution Panels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .80 Electrical Space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .82 24-Volt DC-Electrical System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .82 3.6.1 Batteries and Battery Chargers 83 3.6.2 High Load Isolation 85 230-Volt AC-Electrical System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .85 3.7.1 Hooking-Up the Shorepower System 86 724994 - ISSUE B - 07/13
  6. 6. PRINCESS 56 OWNER’S HANDBOOK 3.8 4. 4.1 4.2 4.3 5. 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 5.5 6. 6.1 6.2 3.7.2 Generator Set 87 Environmental Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .92 3.8.1 Fuel Oil Spillages 92 3.8.2 Exhaust Emissions 92 FRESHWATER SYSTEM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .95 Freshwater System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .95 4.2.1 Quality and Storage 95 4.2.2 Filling 101 4.2.3 Freshwater Tank 101 4.2.4 Filtration 101 4.2.5 Delivery ~ Pressure Water System 101 4.2.6 Water Heating (Calorifier) 102 4.2.7 Grey Water System 103 Environmental Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .103 4.3.1 Discharge and Disposal of Waste Materials 103 BILGE, TOILETS AND BLACK WATER SYSTEMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .105 Bilges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .105 Bilge Pump Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .105 Marine Toilet System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .111 5.4.1 Toilet System Start-Up 114 5.4.2 Normal Toilet Operation 114 5.4.3 Changing Flush Modes 114 5.4.4 Indicator Lights 114 Environmental Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .114 5.5.1 Discharge and Disposal of Waste Materials 114 OPTIONALLY FITTED EQUIPMENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .117 Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .117 6.2.1 Air-Conditioning System 117 6.2.2 Anchor / Forward Deck Wash 128 6.2.3 Black Water Holding Tank 128 6.3.4 Central Heating / Demist 130 6.2.5 Dishwasher (Drawer Type) 131 6.2.6 Docking / Snubbing Winches 131 6.2.7 Drop Bathing Platform (Tender Lift) 131 6.2.8 Flybridge Biminis 132 6.2.9 Flybridge Hardtops / Sliding Sun Panel 133 6.2.10 Gyro Stabiliser 133 6.2.11 Integrated Navigation Equipment 133 6.2.12 Laundry Equipment 134 6.2.13 Retractable Passerelle (Box Gangway) 134 6.2.14 Saloon Icemaker 135 6.2.15 Second Refrigerator (Draw Type) 136 6.2.16 Side Boarding Ladder 136 6.2.17 Stern Thruster 136 6.2.18 Underwater Lighting 136 724994 - ISSUE B - 07/13 5
  7. 7. PRINCESS 56 OWNER’S HANDBOOK 6.3 6.2.19 Variable / Proportional Speed Thrusters 136 6.2.20 Xenta Joystick (Manoeuvring System) 137 Environmental Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .137 6.3.1 Discharge and Disposal of Waste Materials 137 7. 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.8 7.9 7.10 GENERAL MAINTENANCE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .139 Yacht Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .139 Periodic Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .139 Tools and Working Practices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .139 Use of Correct Materials and Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .139 Lifting your Yacht / Hauling-Out . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .140 Storing in a Cradle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .140 Laying-Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .140 Recommissioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .142 Structural and Condition Surveys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .142 8. 8.1 8.2 8.3 DECK EQUIPMENT AND BELOW DECKS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .143 Safety Precautions and Warnings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .143 Routine Maintenance Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .143 8.3.1 The Hull 143 8.3.2 Decks, Superstructure and Cockpit 146 8.3.3 Navigational and Safety Equipment 147 8.3.4 Deck Gear 150 8.3.5 Below Decks 151 Laying-Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .152 Recommissioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .152 8.4 8.5 9. 9.1 9.2 9.3 9.4 9.5 6 MAIN ENGINES, CONTROLS, INSTRUMENTATION AND ALLIED EQUIPMENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .153 Safety Precautions and Warnings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .153 Routine Maintenance Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .154 9.3.1 Main Engines 154 9.3.2 Air System 156 9.3.3 Fuel System 156 9.3.4 Cooling System 157 9.3.5 Exhaust System 158 9.3.6 Engine Electrics 159 9.3.7 Trim Tabs 159 9.3.8 Power-Assisted Electrohydraulic Steering System 160 9.3.9 Bow Thruster 160 9.3.10 Stopcocks and Seacocks 161 9.3.11 Engine Room and Lazarette Compartments 161 9.3.12 Automatic Fire Control System 161 9.3.13 Engine Mounts, Gearboxes, Sterngear and Shafts 161 9.3.14 Cathodic Protection System 164 Laying-Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .166 Recommissioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .166 724994 - ISSUE B - 07/13
  8. 8. PRINCESS 56 OWNER’S HANDBOOK 10. 10.1 10.2 10.3 10.4 10.5 11. 11.1 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.5 12. 12.1 12.2 12.3 12.4 12.5 13. 13.1 13.2 13.3 ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .167 Safety Precautions and Warnings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .167 Routine Maintenance Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .169 10.3.1 Electrical Systems in General 169 10.3.2 Miniature Circuit Breakers 170 10.3.3 24-Volt DC-Electrical System 170 10.3.4 230-Volt AC-Electrical System 172 10.3.5 Generator Set 172 laying-up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .172 Recommissioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .173 FRESHWATER SYSTEM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .175 Safety Precautions and Warnings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .175 Routine Maintenance Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .175 11.3.1 Sanitising the System 175 11.3.2 The System in General 176 11.3.3 Water Heating (Calorifier) 176 11.3.4 Grey Water System 176 Laying-Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .176 Recommissioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .176 BILGE, TOILET AND BLACK WATER SYSTEMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .177 Safety Precautions and Warnings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .177 Routine Maintenance Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .177 12.3.1 Bilges 177 12.3.2 Float Switches and Electric Bilge Pumps 178 12.3.3 Marine Toilet System 178 Laying-Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .178 Recommissioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .179 OPTIONALLY FITTED EQUIPMENT. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .181 Safety Precautions and Warnings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .181 Routine Maintenance Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .182 13.3.1 Air-Conditioning System 182 13.3.2 Anchor / Forward Deck Wash 182 13.3.3 Black Water Holding Tank 182 13.3.4 Central Heating / Demist 182 13.3.5 Dishwasher (Drawer Type) 182 13.3.6 Docking / Snubbing Winches 182 13.3.7 Drop Bathing Platform (Tender Lift) 183 13.3.8 Flybridge Biminis 183 15.3.9 Flybridge Hardtops / Sliding Sun Panel 183 13.3.10 Gyro Stabiliser 183 13.3.11 Integrated Navigation Equipment 183 13.3.12 Laundry Equipment 183 724994 - ISSUE B - 07/13 7
  9. 9. PRINCESS 56 OWNER’S HANDBOOK 13.4 13.5 13.3.13 Retractable Passerelle (Box Gangway) 184 13.2.14 Saloon Icemaker 184 13.3.15 Second Refrigerator (Draw Type) 184 13.3.16 Side Boarding Ladder 184 13.3.17 Stern Thruster 185 13.3.18 Underwater Lighting 185 13.3.19 Variable / Proportional Speed Thrusters 185 13.3.20 Xenta Joystick (Manoeuvring System) 186 Laying-Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .186 Recommissioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .186 14. 14.1 GENERAL MAINTENANCE TABLES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .187 15. 15.1 15.2 APPENDICES. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197 Identification of Hoses and Through-Hull Fittings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .197 Deck Cushion Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .201 8 724994 - ISSUE B - 07/13
  10. 10. PRINCESS 56 OWNER’S HANDBOOK INTRODUCTION This owner’s handbook defines the term ‘owner’ as that of the person charged with the responsibility of operating and maintaining your yacht. This owner’s handbook is not a detailed maintenance or trouble-shooting guide. In the case of difficulty, refer to your Princess dealer and / or the OEM (Original Equipment Manufacturer) literature. Should there be a conflict between any of the information contained in this handbook and that provided by the OEM, then the latter shall prevail. OEM literature is provided separately in a custom case or cases. This owner’s handbook is laid out into two sections for operations and maintenance. Each section is divided into Chapters containing specific system information. According to the specification of your yacht the Figures and photographs shown herein may differ from the equipment fitted. Optional equipment that may be fitted to your yacht is highlighted in the text by the use of an asterisk*. Throughout this handbook the following notices are highlighted to warn of intrinsic dangers, where safety precautions and good practice need to be observed at all times. DANGER - denotes that an extreme intrinsic hazard exists which would result in high probability of death or irreparable injury if proper precautions are not taken. WARNING - denotes that a hazard exists which can result in injury or death if proper precautions are not taken. CAUTION - denotes a reminder of safety practices or directs attention to unsafe practices which could result in personal injury or damage to the yacht or components or to the environment. Warning Labels Used Onboard The following warning labels are displayed onboard your yacht to warn you and your crew of intrinsic dangers, where safety precautions and good practice need to be observed at all times: ƽ & WARNING - denotes that a hazard exists which can result in injury or death if proper precautions are not taken. Ꮨ ELECTRICAL HAZARD - denotes areas, equipment and operational practices exposed to severe risk of electrical hazard which can result in injury or death if proper precautions are not taken. Ƹ FIRE RISK - denotes areas, equipment and operational practices exposed to severe fire risk which can result in injury or death if proper precautions are not taken. REFER TO ORIGINAL EQUIPMENT MANUFACTURER’S (OEM) LITERATURE - read carefully all OEM literature. Where annotated, this label refers to the owner’s handbook in the absence of OEM literature. DESIGN, CONSTRUCTION AND COMPLIANCE Compliance with the European Union Recreational Craft Directive Princess yachts are built to comply with the European Union ‘Recreational Craft Directive’ (RCD). The RCD is a trading standard that requires all yachts supplied in countries that are members of the European Union meet certain minimum essential safety requirements when first sold. These standards are laid down in a number of National and International Standards and incorporated in the construction of the yacht. Declaration of Conformity of Recreational Craft with the Design, Construction and Noise Emission requirements of Directive 94/25/EC as amended by Directive 2003/44/EC are shown in figures 1 and 2. Homologation, Certifications, Builder’s Plate, Design Category and Identification Homologation and certification ~ to ensure that the exacting standards demanded in the manufacture of a Princess are constantly met, all production methods used are approved by Lloyd’s Register Quality Assurance (QA) and comply with ISO-9001 / ISO-9002. 724994 - ISSUE B - 07/13 9
  11. 11. PRINCESS 56 OWNER’S HANDBOOK FIGURE 1 - DECLARATION OF CONFORMITY (PAGE 1 OF 2) 10 724994 - ISSUE B - 07/13
  12. 12. PRINCESS 56 OWNER’S HANDBOOK FIGURE 2 - DECLARATION OF CONFORMITY (PAGE 2 OF 2) 724994 - ISSUE B - 07/13 11
  13. 13. PRINCESS 56 OWNER’S HANDBOOK Make and model Princess 56 Design category Category B (offshore) Maximum crew 15 (1125Kgs) Maximum stores and equipment See figure 3 Maximum storage weight on transom platform 450Kgs (992lbs) Maximum storage weight on flybridge platform 0Kgs (0lbs) Length overall (inc. pulpit) 59ft 5in (18.11m) Length overall (exc. pulpit) 57ft 6in (17.53m) Beam 15ft 7in (4.76m) Draft 4ft 3in (1.29m) Air Draft [approx. from waterline (DWL) to the top of the stainless steel radar arch structure (+/-100mm depending on options / equipment, fuel, freshwater, crew and stores). Draft does not include any navigation and communications equipment fitted above this point]. 20ft 0in (6.1m) Displacement (2 x Volvo D13-800) 26,800kgs (59,084lbs) Fuel capacity 582 gal/699 US gal/2650l Freshwater capacity (inc. calorifier) 130 gal/156 US gal/592l Holding tank capacity 45 gal/54 US gal/202l Princess yachts are designed and built to ‘World-Class’ manufacturing standards in all areas of construction and engineering. All are supplied with CE and builder’s certification. Builder's plate ~ part of the information is given on the builder's plate affixed on the yacht. A full explanation of this information is given in the relevant sections of this handbook. Design categorisation ~ the design category defines the builder’s intended usage for the yacht and is based upon the RCD. See stability statement in compliance with ISO 12217-1:2002 shown in figure 3. This standard categorizes your craft as Category B - This craft is designed to operate in winds up to Beaufort force 8 and the associated wave heights (significant wave height up to 4 m). Such conditions may be encountered on offshore voyages of sufficient length, or on coastal waters when unsheltered from the wind and waves for several dozens of nautical miles. These conditions may also be experienced on inland seas of sufficient size for the wave height to be generated. The significant wave height is the mean height of the highest one-third of the waves, which approximately corresponds to the wave height estimated by an experienced observer. Some waves will be double this height. Any change in the disposition of the masses aboard (for example the addition of a fishing tower, a radar, change of engine, etc.) may significantly affect the stability, trim and performance of the yacht. WARNING - even though your yacht is categorized for category B use, the sea and wind conditions corresponding to the design is open to the hazards of a freak wave or gust. These are therefore dangerous conditions, where only a competent, fit and trained crew using a well maintained craft can satisfactorily operate. Maximum crew, stores and equipment ~ the number of persons as per the limit given on the builder’s plate and in the stability statement (figure 3) is the absolute maximum number recommended and must never be exceeded. It is assumed that persons are located with due consideration to the sea condition, their physical ability and with due regard to the stability of the yacht. 12 724994 - ISSUE B - 07/13
  14. 14. PRINCESS 56 OWNER’S HANDBOOK FIGURE 3 - STABILITY STATEMENT 724994 - ISSUE B - 07/13 13
  15. 15. PRINCESS 56 OWNER’S HANDBOOK Consideration must also be given as to the maximum amount of stores and equipment you should carry and to the distribution of crew and equipment with regards to the yacht’s stability. Where persons are not embarked, you may increase the amount of equipment and stores carried by approximately 75 kg per person. Where additional heavy equipment is fitted, the maximum number of persons should be reduced pro rata to the weight of that equipment. See the builder’s plate and stability statement (figure 3). WARNING - do not exceed the maximum recommended number of persons. Regardless of the number of persons on board, the total weight of persons and equipment must never exceed the maximum recommended load. Always use the seats / seating spaces provided. Loading ~ the maximum recommended load given in the stability statement (see figure 3) includes the weight of all persons onboard, all provisions and personal effects, any equipment not included in the light craft condition mass, cargo (if any) and all consumable liquids (freshwater, diesel fuel, etcetera). WARNING - when loading the yacht, never exceed the maximum recommended load. Always load the craft carefully and distribute loads appropriately to maintain design trim (approximately level). Avoid placing heavy weights high up. Craft, engine and gearbox identification numbers ~ the Craft Identification Number (CIN) is moulded into the transom and is unique to your yacht. Engine and reverse gear serial numbers are also unique and can be found on their outer casings. HEALTH AND SAFETY Safety at sea is ultimately governed by International Law, although local regulations can and do apply. These will vary from country-to-country. Owners are required to exercise the appropriate ‘regulations’ and ‘codes of practice’ as recognised and approved in the local waters where the yacht is operating. Safety is our primary concern; therefore, on taking delivery of your yacht, every owner must be aware that it is their sole responsibility to ensure that the safety of their yacht and anyone using it are met (whether or not they are on board). If you have any concerns regarding the handling of the yacht, we would ask you to discuss the matter with your Princess distributor before using the yacht. General Safety Remember that motor yachts, and generally just being on or around boats, can be potentially dangerous. Equipment with moving parts such as the anchor windlass, passerelle / gangway*, snubbing winches* and concealed transom crane* must only be operated by competent crew and with the utmost vigilance. See chapters 1 and 6. Ensure that the anticipated wind and sea conditions will correspond to the design category of your yacht, and that you and your crew are able to handle the yacht in these conditions. Always use trained and competent people for maintenance, repairs or modifications. Modifications that may affect the safety characteristics of the yacht shall be assessed, executed and documented by competent people. Always maintain your yacht properly and make allowance for the deterioration that will occur in time and as a result of heavy use or misuse of the yacht. Any yacht, no matter how strong it may be, can be severely damaged if not used properly. This is not compatible with safe boating. Always adjust the speed and direction of the yacht to sea conditions. Your yacht should be fitted with a liferaft (or liferafts), carefully read the OEM literature. The yacht should have onboard the appropriate safety equipment (lifejackets, harness, etc.) according to the type of yacht, weather conditions, etcetera. This equipment is mandatory in some countries. The crew should be familiar with the use of all safety equipment and emergency manoeuvring (man-overboard recovery, towing, etcetera), sailing schools and clubs regularly organize drill sessions. 14 724994 - ISSUE B - 07/13
  16. 16. PRINCESS 56 OWNER’S HANDBOOK All persons should wear a suitable buoyancy aid (life jacket/personal floatation device) when on deck. Note that, in some countries, it is a legal requirement to wear a buoyancy aid that complies with their national regulations at all times. Man-overboard Recovery It is recommended that man-overboard recovery is undertaken using the bathing platform and bathing ladder. Ensure that the main engines are fully stopped before attempting to board anyone via the bathing platform. Anyone assisting the recovery must suitably fitted with a lifejacket / safety harness and line before attempting to recover the man-overboard. GOOD SEAMANSHIP Before Putting to Sea You must always inform the local Coastguard station (or equivalent organisation) of impending departures from port and report your safe arrival at the next port or safe anchorage. Before leaving sheltered waters, always check the weather forecast. It is fundamental to good seamanship to avoid extreme weather conditions whenever possible. Always heed gale warnings. Always ensure that you keep an up-to-date logbook and that your insurance covers your yacht for its intended use. These documents along with proof of ownership / purchase, excise payments and warranty documents must be kept onboard in a safe and secure location when the yacht is in use and taken ashore when leaving the yacht. Yacht Speed and Visibility Helmsman / operator vision (see figure 4) from the helm can be obstructed by high trim angles of the yacht and other factors caused by one or more of the following conditions: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Trim plane angles on the hull. Speed. Rapid acceleration. Transition from displacement to planing mode. Sea conditions. Rain and spray. Darkness and fog. Interior lights. Curtains/blinds. Persons or movable gear in the helmsman’s field of vision. The International Regulations for Prevention of Collision at Sea (COLREGS) and the rules of the road require that a proper lookout be maintained at all times and observance of right of way. Observance of these rules is essential. CAUTIONS 1. If the field of vision is limited, maintain a lookout forward and astern as required by COLREGS and the rule of the road. 2. Always navigate your craft at a speed that is prudent to the prevailing weather conditions. In confined and busy waters you must navigate your craft at a speed that is safe for the conditions. Towing / Under Tow Where your yacht is either towing or under tow, a split rope bridle must be made across the forward (or aft) mooring cleats (ensuring that lines are lead through the fairleads). See Chapter 1. The split rope bridle will distribute the towing weight evenly across the mooring cleats. Consideration must be made whilst towing (or under tow) with regard to the safety of crew and guests, the towing weight, boat speed (avoid high speeds as snatching will occur), boat trim, sea state, wind speed and direction. Engine exhaust systems must be protected against any back-flooding. See Chapters 2 and 9. 724994 - ISSUE B - 07/13 15
  17. 17. PRINCESS 56 OWNER’S HANDBOOK FIGURE 4 - FIELD OF VISION FIELD OF VISION REQUIRED BY ISO 11591, 4.1.1 FIELD OF VISION REQUIRED BY ISO 11591, 4.1.2 FIELD OF VISION REQUIRED BY ISO 11591, 4.1.3 FIELD OF VISION REQUIRED BY ISO 11591, 5.1 AND 5.2 FIELD OF VISION OBSTRUCTED BY PERMANENT SUPERSTRUCTURE 16 724994 - ISSUE B - 07/13
  18. 18. PRINCESS 56 OWNER’S HANDBOOK PROVISION OF DISTRESS, LIFESAVING AND SAFETY EQUIPMENT It is the owner’s responsibility to provide sufficient lifesaving and safety equipment required by law for all crewmembers on board and to check that all safety equipment such as the fire extinguishers, distress rockets, flares, lifejackets and life rafts are properly maintained. Including renewing equipment as necessary or recharging the fire extinguishers at the predetermined intervals. If you are at all unsure as to your obligations, you should procure a suitable official publication concerning safety at sea. Your yacht is fitted as standard with safety related equipment including electric and emergency manual bilge pump systems, an automatic fire suppression system for the engine room and an automatic extinguisher for the lazarette, hand-held fire extinguishers, VHF DSC radiotelephone and basic navigational equipment including a magnetic steering compasses and speed and depth indicators. A custom holder is provided in the cockpit for the stowage of a life raft. See figure 6. The Marine Administration in the country where you register your yacht lays down the actual equipment you are required to carry. Local bylaws may also require you to carry additional items. NAVIGATIONAL EQUIPMENT The use of electronic navigational equipment must only be used in conjunction with conventional navigation methods and good seamanship. Navigation instrumentation is isolated by the ‘NAVIGATION INSTRUMENTS’ switch (01) on the 24-volt DC switch panel. Instrumentation and the magnetic steering compass lighting is isolated by switches at the helms. 01 24-VOLT DC SWITCH PANEL The standard equipment fitted includes: Magnetic Steering Compasses Although magnetic steering compasses are fitted to the main helm and the flybridge helm (02), an additional hand-held bearing compass must be carried as standard equipment. You should note that all magnetic compasses are prone to variation and deviation, which deflect the indicated heading from the ‘true north’ position. Variation and deviation are defined as: 1. Variation ~ is caused by earth’s magnetism. The amount of variation changes with time and geography. All navigational charts give information on the amount of variation that exists. To allow for variation error it is only necessary to: a) 2. Look up the variation on the appropriate chart and make the necessary allowances due to the annual changes given on the chart. b) 02 Apply the correction (due to variation) to the compass readings. Deviation ~ is caused by the yacht’s magnetism. The amount of deviation experienced will vary depending upon the heading of the yacht and can be as much as 30°. Therefore, before taking the yacht to sea for the first time, arrange for a qualified compass adjuster to correct your compasses and provide you with deviation cards for them. These cards record the error on each heading of the compasses. The amount of deviation must be checked from time-to-time and the cards updated. Owners should take note that certain modifications to the yacht can affect the amount of deviation registered by the compasses. CAUTION - COMPASS ERROR - never leave metallic or electrical equipment close to the compasses, as this will induce errors. Even smallest of metal objects can be sufficient to deflect the compass headings. 724994 - ISSUE B - 07/13 17
  19. 19. PRINCESS 56 OWNER’S HANDBOOK Multifunctional Instruments Yachts are fitted with dual-station TFT LCD multifunctional instruments (03). Instruments are 24-volt DC operated and form part of an NMEA2000 or SeaTalk network where optional navigation equipment is fitted. 03 The instrument provides multiple marine instrument functions in a single unit and displays information received from transducers and other sensors fitted to the yacht. There are multiple pages of information available, which you can customise to suit your needs. Transducers/sensors must be calibrated in accordance with the OEM literature. Basic functions include: Depth - the Depth instrument is the single most important instrument on any yacht with regards to safe navigation and is an invaluable aid to anchoring. Providing shallow, deep and anchor alarms as well as displays for current depth, maximum depth, minimum depth. Speed - the Speed instrument (and log) is used to calculate current speed, maximum speed, average speed, and speed over ground. It also keeps track of distances travelled via the boat log and resettable trip distance displays. Dual Station Autopilot Yachts are fitted with a dual-station hydraulic autopilot system plumbed directly into the main electrohydraulic steering system via directional solenoids built into the power steering system HPU (see Chapter 2). The system is fitted with a dedicated heading sensor (fluxgate compass) (04) and is operated by a TFT LCD control panel (05). The heading sensor requires calibration in accordance with the OEM literature. 04 The autopilot is isolated by the ‘AUTOPILOT’ switch (06) on the 24-volt DC switch panel and forms part of the Seatalk network. YOU MUST READ CAREFULLY THE OEM LITERATURE BEFORE USING THIS EQUIPMENT. When operating an autopilot system, the following basic points must be followed: 1. Keep a good lookout. 2. The autopilot will work more efficiently if the yacht is correctly trimmed. 3. Do not attempt to manoeuvre in tight or crowded water conditions under autopilot. 4. Undertake course changes by a series of moderate adjustments, allowing the autopilot to settle between movements. The autopilot’s heading sensor may be confused with massive sudden course changes. 5. 18 05 06 24-VOLT DC SWITCH PANEL If the steering becomes inconsistent, override the autopilot at once and investigate. Do not reuse the autopilot until the cause of the problem has been investigated. 724994 - ISSUE B - 07/13
  20. 20. PRINCESS 56 OWNER’S HANDBOOK CAUTION - AUTOPILOT - the autopilot uses an electronic fluxgate compass for heading and course. The compass sensor is fitted in the bilge area at the base of the saloon stairs leading to the accommodation area - this bilge compartment must not be used to stow or fit any equipment liable to effect the correct function of the magnetic sensor. Horns and Twin-Beam Searchlight The horns and a twin-beam motorised searchlight are fitted as standard (see OEM literature). The horns are activated by a halo-switch at the main helm (07) and by a Carling switch at the flybridge. The searchlight is operated by a control panel (08) at the helms and fitted with a control box below the helm console. Horns and the searchlight are powered by the 24-volt DC electrical system (auxiliary / domestic batteries) and are isolated on the secondary switch panel. See Chapter 3. 07 08 VHF DSC RADIOTELEPHONES Only competent qualified operators or crew under their supervision should use dual-station VHF DSC radiotelephones (09). Radiotelephone installations and operators are required by law to be licensed. Radiotelephones must not be used for unnecessary or prolonged conversations. Check your local almanac for other professional channel usage, such as the Coastguard and Port Authorities. YOU MUST READ CAREFULLY THE OEM LITERATURE BEFORE USING THIS EQUIPMENT. The radiotelephony equipment is 12-volt DC [powered by the 24-volt DC electrical system (auxiliary / domestic batteries) via a 24-volt to 12-volt converter] and isolated on the secondary switch panel. The converter is fitted in the electrical space. See Chapter 3. 09 The standard fit radiotelephones are provided with an intercom facility between sets and a deck loudhailer function. See OEM literature for use. DSC - DSC automates the transmission and reception of emergency radio communications (replacing manual mayday calls on Channel 16). DSC radiotelephones exchange digital messages on Channel 70, on which all voice calls are prohibited. Radiotelephones are fitted with two separate receivers, one permanently tuned to Channel 70. Each digital message contains: your yacht's unique, nine-digit Mobile Marine Service Identification number (MMSI), a call category identifier (Mayday, Securitay, Pan-Pan, routine, etc.) and your yacht's precise position from a connected GPS. A complete digital message is sent in about a third of a second. Mayday messages are sent automatically by pressing the ‘DISTRESS’ emergency button. Once sent, mayday calls automatically repeat until acknowledged by an answering DSC radiotelephone. MMSIs are issued by the national radiocommunications body where yacht is registered. Mandatory electronic transmitting licenses - all radio equipment that includes a transmitter of any kind, such as radar, VHF, SSB, EPIRB, SART and Satcom, requires the owner by law to have possession of a current ‘ship radio license’ at the time of installation. 724994 - ISSUE B - 07/13 19
  21. 21. PRINCESS 56 OWNER’S HANDBOOK ELECTRO MAGNETIC COMPLIANCE Owners should note that, despite the efforts to sort out Electro Magnetic Compliance (EMC), some vital navigational equipment (including magnetic compasses) can crash or give false readings when mobile telephones are switched on in their vicinity. Even the automatic updating and receipt of text messages can cause problems. CAUTION - MOBILE TELEPHONES - mobile telephones in use or on standby can interfere with electronic equipment. It is known for equipment, such as GPS receivers to crash and for autopilots to fail when mobile telephones are used in close proximity. A text message being received on a mobile resting on the main instrument panel is known to have caused instrumentation to crash. FIRE-FIGHTING EQUIPMENT AND FIRE PREVENTION Fire-Fighting Equipment The Marine Administration of the country where you register your yacht lays down the actual equipment you are required to carry. Local bylaws may also require you to carry additional items. The yacht, when in service shall be equipped with portable fire extinguishers of the capacities and in the locations given in Figure 5. An automatic fire control system is fitted in the engine room and lazarette (see Chapter 2). Additionally, hand held general-purpose fire extinguishers are provided at strategic locations throughout the yacht. Owners must inform the crew of the location and operation of fire fighting equipment and the whereabouts of escape hatches, ladders, doors and routes (see Figure 6). Ensure that the fire fighting equipment is readily accessible when the yacht is occupied. It is the responsibility of the owner to ensure that fire-fighting equipment is readily accessible when the yacht is occupied, and to inform members of the crew about: 1. The location and operation of fire-fighting equipment (see Figure 5). 2. The discharge of fixed fire extinguishers. 3. The location of escape routes and exits (see Figure 6). The owner shall in addition provide: 1. A fire blanket in the galley. 2. At least one fire bucket (with a lanyard attached) stowed in a ready accessible position for the protection of the deck. CAUTIONS 1. 2. When replacing parts of the fire-fighting installation, only matching components shall be used, bearing the same designation or having equivalent technical and fire-resistant capabilities. 3. Do not fit free-hanging curtains or other fabrics in the vicinity of, or above, cookers or other open-flame devices. 4. 20 Keep the bilges clean and check for fuel and gas vapours or fuel leaks frequently. Do not stow combustible material in the engine room or lazarette. If non-combustible materials are stowed in the engine room or lazarette, they shall be secured against falling into machinery and shall cause no obstruction to access into or from the space. 724994 - ISSUE B - 07/13
  22. 22. PRINCESS 56 OWNER’S HANDBOOK FIGURE 5 - LOCATION OF FIRE-FIGHTING EQUIPMENT FIRE EXTINGUISHER LOCATIONS 724994 - ISSUE B - 07/13 21
  23. 23. 22 1 FIGURE 6 - LOCATION OF EMERGENCY ESCAPE ROUTES 1. PRIMARY ESCAPE ROUTES SECONDARY ESCAPE ROUTES LIFERAFT STOWAGE PRINCESS 56 OWNER’S HANDBOOK 724994 - ISSUE B - 07/13
  24. 24. PRINCESS 56 OWNER’S HANDBOOK WARNINGS 1. Never obstruct passageways to exits and hatches. 2. Never obstruct safety controls, for example: fuelcocks and switches of the electrical system. 3. Never obstruct portable fire extinguishers stowed in lockers. 4. Never leave the craft unattended when cooking and / or heating appliances are in use, use gas lights in the yacht. 5. Never modify any of the yacht's systems or allow unqualified personnel to modify any of the yacht's systems. 6. Never fill any fuel tank when machinery is running, or when cooking or heating appliances are in use. 7. Never smoke while handling fuel. AFTERSALES SUPPORT Policy Any new work undertaken on the yacht or warranty service must be undertaken in accordance with the warranty conditions. Your Princess distributor represents our product and will afford you the courtesy and necessary help to resolve any problems you may have. Nominated contractors or the OEM will provide the service direct. To ensure that OEM support can be given, please complete and register all warranty cards for the equipment fitted on your yacht. Where you are required to carry a copy of this registration on the yacht to obtain warranty support, the cards must be retained in a safe place aboard the yacht as the manufacturer will almost certainly wish to see it before providing support. Warranty Assistance To help resolve warranty issues as quickly and as efficiently as possible, owners should familiarise themselves with the terms and duration of warranties offered in their contract. As regards warranty enquiries, you must contact your Princess distributor in the first instance. Warranty Agreement a) The Company does not warrant: i) ii) Any equipment independently warranted by its manufacturer or supplier. iv) Any vessel or equipment in any regard whatever that has been modified, added or adapted in any way by or on behalf of a Customer after delivery except with the Company’s express written approval to such modification. v) 724994 - ISSUE B - 07/13 That any vessel will meet the requirements of any particular river, harbour, conservancy or other local, national or international licensing, measuring or registering authority or any such body that may be applicable to its operation. iii) b) Any speed or other measures of performance for any vessel. Any vessel or equipment fitted thereon that has been used for commercial use including hire or charter. No vessel, goods or equipment supplied to a Customer shall carry any warranty or condition of sale express or implied as to quality or as to fitness for any particular purpose. Unless the Customer when ordering such a vessel, goods or equipment sufficiently explains the purpose for which it is required and makes it clear, they are relying on the Company’s skill and judgement. 23
  25. 25. PRINCESS 56 OWNER’S HANDBOOK c) No proprietary article ordered by name type and / or size by a Customer shall carry any such warranty or condition of sale as is mentioned in sub clause b) above save as far as the Company is able to assign the benefit of a manufacturer’s warranty. d) Any claim by the Customer (whether excluded under these terms or not) shall in all cases be subject to observance by the Customer of the following mandatory code of conduct: i) ii) The Customer shall report any defects to the Company in writing as soon as reasonably practical and in any event within fourteen days after such defect shall have become apparent. iii) e) The Customer shall exercise reasonable care in inspecting any craft or equipment on delivery and from time to time thereafter and will exercise reasonable care in maintaining and using the craft and all equipment thereon from time to time. Except in case of emergency the Customer shall not carry out or cause to be carried out any repairs to the craft or any of the equipment without first affording to the Company or its nominated agents an opportunity of inspecting the craft or equipment and carrying out such repairs as may be found to be necessary. In no event does the Company accept liability to a Customer for consequential loss beyond the cost of replacement of any faulty or unfit vessel, goods or equipment supplied. Warranty Registration Having taken delivery of your yacht, you must complete the registration details and return the completed warranty registration form supplied. This information is very important and will be requested should you require aftersales service at any time. If you are in any doubt about where to find the information requested, your Princess distributor will be more than happy to help you locate it. REGISTRATION DETAILS YACHT NAME: YACHT TYPE: OWNER’S NAME: YARD NUMBER: CIN NUMBER: ENGINE OEM: TYPE: SERIAL NUMBERS: Princess 56 GB-PYI Port Engine Starboard Engine GEARBOX (REVERSE GEAR) OEM: TYPE: SERIAL NUMBERS: Port Gear Box Starboard Gear Box 24 724994 - ISSUE B - 07/13
  26. 26. PRINCESS 56 OWNER’S HANDBOOK COMMISSIONING PRINCESS DISTRIBUTOR NAME OF DISTRIBUTOR: ADDRESS: TELEPHONE NUMBER: FAX NUMBER: INSURANCE Don’t forget to arrange for a fully comprehensive insurance policy to suit your cruising programme (include any lay-up period). The dates of the lay-up and recommissioning must be conveyed to your insurers. 724994 - ISSUE B - 07/13 25
  27. 27. PRINCESS 56 OWNER’S HANDBOOK 26 724994 - ISSUE B - 07/13
  28. 28. SECTION 1, CHAPTER 1 OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS PRINCESS 56 OWNER’S HANDBOOK 1. DECK EQUIPMENT AND BELOW DECKS 1.1 INTRODUCTION This chapter contains the necessary information required to operate the general equipment fitted on and below decks in safety and with consideration to the environment. Refer to Chapter 8 for maintenance procedures. Before operating the systems and equipment described, you must familiarise yourself with the necessary procedures and supporting information given in the OEM literature. Failure to follow the specified procedures could result in personal injury or damage to property or the equipment. If you are in any doubt about any operation or the information provided, please contact your Princess distributor directly, who will be able to assist you with an explanation or will demonstrate the operation. 1.2 ON DECK 1.2.1 Deck Fittings / Equipment and Safe Working Deck Areas Never attempt to operate or use deck equipment where there are people in the way of operations. Due care and attention must be given to crew safety whilst anchoring, mooring (using the deck cleats and fairleads), towing or under tow, using the passerelle*, drop bathing platform* and open or partially open hatches. Crew and guests, other than those tasked with using the equipment should be kept at safe distance. See Figures 1.1 to 1.3 with regard to the location of deck fittings / equipment and the safe working deck areas. 1.2.2 Anchor Windlass and Anchoring A reversible electric windlass (1-01) fitted above a self-stowing chain locker (1-02) is used to drop and retrieve the anchor. The windlass is supplied with a 25kgs/55lbs Delta anchor and 40m/131ft of chain. The windlass is 24-volt DC (engine start batteries) and is operated by locking Carling switches (103) at both helms. Alternatively, it can be operated from the bow using a hand-held control unit (1-04) stowed in the chain locker. The circuit is isolated by the ‘WINDLASS’ switch (1-05) on the 24-volt switch panel (an LED indicates when the circuit is live). A control box (1-06) is fitted outboard of the starboard cabin hanging locker. The windlass should only be operated whilst the main engines are running. As a precaution against overloading the windlass motor unit, the circuit is protected by a switchable circuit breaker fitted in an master switch box in the lazarette. In the event of a trip, investigate the cause before reuse. To reset the circuit breaker after a trip, simply re-depress the ‘WINDLASS’ switch [or by manually resetting the master switch box breaker (1-07)]. 1-01 1-02 1-03 When anchoring the anchorman must make sure that the chain is coming up on the right line to the stemhead and that the anchor beds home properly in the stemhead fitting. The self-stowing feature of the anchor retrieval process should ensure that the chain needs no attention as it runs across the deck to the windlass and down the hawse into the chain locker. When going to anchor, the general rule is to veer out chain equal to threetimes-the-depth-at-high-water. By clearly marking every ten metres of chain, the anchorman can visually measure this. 724994 - ISSUE B - 07/13 27
  29. 29. OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS SECTION 1, CHAPTER 1 PRINCESS 56 OWNER’S HANDBOOK FIGURE 1.1 - LOCATION OF DECK FITTINGS / EQUIPMENT 28 724994 - ISSUE B - 07/13
  30. 30. OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS SECTION 1, CHAPTER 1 PRINCESS 56 OWNER’S HANDBOOK 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 44. 45. 46. 47. 48. 49. 50. 51. 52. 53. 54. 55. 56. 57. 58. 724994 - ISSUE B - 07/13 FLYBRIDGE STAIR RAIL FUEL FILLER COVER LIFERAFT LOCKER COAMING RAIL FLYBRIDGE STEPS SNUBBING WINCH FOOT SWITCH* PASSERELLE CONTROL PANEL CLEAT ROPE LOCKER SNUBBING WINCH* FAIRLEAD AIR VENTS TRANSOM GATE SHORE SUPPORT LOCKER TRANSOM SHOWER GRAB RAIL CLEAT BATHING PLATFORM (DROP BATHING PLATFORM)* PASSERELLE FIXED TRANSOM AND STAIRS LAZARETTE WINDOW (CREW CABIN WINDOW*) RAIL (INCLUDING ENSIGN SOCKET/STAFF) COCKPIT TABLE CREW CABIN HATCH* TRANSOM GATE FAIRLEAD ROPE LOCKER COCKPIT AND STAIRS TO SIDE DECK ENGINE ROOM HATCH FIRE SUPPORT LOCKER COAMING RAIL FUEL FILLER COVER AIR VENTS COACHROOF RAIL FOREDECK SUNBED LUFF TRACK FORWARD CABIN ESCAPE HATCH (SEE INTRODUCTION) PULPIT RAIL CHAIN LOCKER HATCH FAIRLEAD WINDLASS STEMHEAD ROLLER FAIRLEAD CHAIN LOCKER HATCH SALOON DOOR FENDERING DROP WINDOW DROP WINDOW SIDE DECK AND FORWARD DECK LOCKERS* STERN DOCKING LIGHTS* SIDE BOARDING LADDER* CREW PORTLIGHT* 29
  31. 31. OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS SECTION 1, CHAPTER 1 PRINCESS 56 OWNER’S HANDBOOK FIGURE 1.2 - LOCATION OF FLYBRIDGE FITTINGS / EQUIPMENT 30 724994 - ISSUE B - 07/13
  32. 32. SECTION 1, CHAPTER 1 OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS PRINCESS 56 OWNER’S HANDBOOK 60. 61. 62. 63. 64. 65. 66. 67. 68. 69. 70. 71. 72. 73. 74. 75. 76. 77. 78. 79. 80. 81. 82. 83. 84. 85. 86. 724994 - ISSUE B - 07/13 FORWARD SCREENS HORN SEARCHLIGHT (OPTIONAL POSITION) FLY SCREEN SIDE SCREENS NAVIGATION LIGHTS WHIP AERIALS (VHF/AM/FM) CANOPY COMBING RAILS SIDE SCREEN RAILS BOAT MODEL PLATE RADAR MAST AND FITTINGS AFT RAIL AFT SCREEN STERN LIGHT CANOPY LINER HELM CONSOLE SEAT PEDESTAL WET BAR TEAK DECKING* HATCH GRANNY RAIL BIMINI HYDRAULICS AND LIGHTS* DRAIN TABLE SEATING RADAR ARCH PANELS EXTERIOR HI-FI SPEAKERS 31
  33. 33. OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS SECTION 1, CHAPTER 1 32 SAFE WORKING DECK AREA FIGURE 1.3 - SAFE WORKING DECK AREA PRINCESS 56 OWNER’S HANDBOOK 724994 - ISSUE B - 07/13
  34. 34. OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS SECTION 1, CHAPTER 1 PRINCESS 56 OWNER’S HANDBOOK Anchor Windlass ~ the windlass is not designed to hold high loads and must not be used as a ‘strong point’ to secure the yacht. When anchoring, a rope bridle (or strop) must be used to transfer any load from the gypsy to the forward mooring cleats. 1-04 Stowage security strap ~ should only be applied when the anchor is stowed at the bow. The strap (1-08) must be applied before making way. Manual operation ~ in the event of a power failure the windlass can be operated using a winch handle fitted (1-09) in the foredeck locker. Windlasses are fitted with a ‘free fall’ function to drop the anchor. See OEM literature. Going to Anchor - when going to anchor, the following observations must be followed: 1. Check your charts and / or call up the local Harbour Master. Beware that anchoring is prohibited in certain locations. 2. Turn on the depth sounder (the depth sounder comes with an ‘Anchor Watch’ facility to monitor tidal height ~ low and high water alarm limits can be programmed). 4. Check the nature of the sea bottom from the charts to ensure that the anchor will hold. 5. Check that the ‘WINDLASS’ switch is on (ready for retrieval if required) and that the anchor is clear and ready to lower. Check that the stowage security strap is free and the anchor is clear and ready to lower. Do not lower the anchor into the water until you have stopped at your intended anchorage. Remember the anchor drop area will be set forward approximately threetimes-the-depth-of-high-water. Be careful to avoid fouling other anchors if the anchorage is crowded. 6. Leave adequate room from other craft at anchor. 7. Just before dropping the anchor put the engines astern momentarily to take the anchor and chain away from the hull. Always allow the anchor chain to drop freely ensuring that it is clear of any snags. 8. When you feel that the anchor has set (bedded) correctly and that the desired amount of chain has been dropped, give the engines a light kick astern to check that the anchor is holding. Switch off the ‘WINDLASS’ switch. 24-VOLT DC SWITCH PANEL Check the tidal and local weather forecast to ensure that the anchorage that you select will not become too exposed. 3. 1-05 1-06 1-07 1-08 CAUTION - GOING TO ANCHOR - when the yacht has settled, use the depth sounder to obtain the water depth, plot the yacht’s position on the chart and check the position at regular intervals. Set the depth sounder to ‘anchor watch’. 724994 - ISSUE B - 07/13 33
  35. 35. OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS SECTION 1, CHAPTER 1 PRINCESS 56 OWNER’S HANDBOOK Retrieving the Anchor - when retrieving (or weighing) an anchor, the following observations must be followed: 1-09 1. Start the main engines. 2. Check that the ‘WINDLASS’ switch is on and that the anchor is ready to be raised. 3. Give the engines a light kick ahead to take the weight off the anchor chain and ensure the chain stopper is freed. As the weight on the chain eases, haul the chain in on the windlass. 4. If the anchor chain appears to be causing an excessive strain on the windlass, with the anchor pulling immediately under the bow, you should stop the windlass and secure the chain before giving the engines a light kick astern to break out the anchor. 5. To avoid the risk of fouling another craft’s anchor or chain when moving away from an anchorage, never move ahead until the anchor is safely retrieved and secured. Switch off the ‘WINDLASS’ switch and apply the stowage security strap. CAUTION - RETRIEVING THE ANCHOR - ensure that the anchor is safely secured in the stemhead roller fitting and the stowage security strap applied before getting under way. When motoring in rough seas or heavy weather, the anchor must always be securely lashed to the stemhead fitting. 1.2.3 Bathing Platform and Boarding Ladders The bathing platform is supplied with tender chocking system (maximum storage weight 400kgs/881lbs) and a boarding ladder. When using the boarding ladder you will need to be cautious of the motion of the sea and swell, if you need assistance ask a member of the crew to help you. Where its prudent, DON A LIFEJACKET. A side boarding ladder* is provided as an option.Only one person at a time can use the boarding ladders. 1.2.4 Windscreen, Wipers and Screenwash Whenever you leave the yacht, especially in countries with a high level of direct sunlight, you must always fit the screen covers to protect the interior of your yacht from UV degradation. Windscreen wipers ~ windscreen wipers are operated by two-way Carling switches (1-10) fitted at the main helm (these switches also operate the screenwash system).The wiper motors and screenwash are powered by the 24-volt DC electrical system (auxiliary / domestic batteries). See Chapter 3. Wiper blades must be kept in good condition and checked regularly for UV degradation and fair wear and tear ~ when fitting new blades ensure that the orientation of the blade is correct. See OEM literature. To operate the windscreen wipers (and screenwash), press the upper half of switches to activate wipers in low speed (level ‘2’). Subsequent presses of the upper or lower half of switches will access the following modes: WIPER MODE System Off Wiper is in parking area 1 Intermittent mode 2 (Initial Position) Low speed 3 High speed Washer Program 34 DESCRIPTION Wash-wipe (Low speed) 1-10 724994 - ISSUE B - 07/13
  36. 36. SECTION 1, CHAPTER 1 OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS PRINCESS 56 OWNER’S HANDBOOK To switch off the wipers (system off), press and hold the lower half of switches (in any mode) for approximately two seconds. Screenwash ~ the windscreen is fitted with a washer system (which draws freshwater from the potable water system via a non return valve / solenoid. The screenwash is plumbed into the cold water system on the distribution side of the pressure pump system. To operate the screenwash, press and hold the upper half of the Carling switches (1-10) (in any mode) for approximately two seconds screenwash will remain on until deactivated, to deactivate the screenwash (washer mode) press and hold the lower half of switches for approximately two seconds, screenwash will stop. 1.3 BELOW DECKS 1.3.1 Accommodation in General Below decks, the furniture and bulkheads are made from natural wood and veneered ply finished with a sprayed lacquer protective coating. Soft furnishings include vinyl linings, textile curtains, seating and bunk cushions (natural leather seating maybe supplied as an option in the saloon). Cabin soles are carpeted. Inspection hatches providing access to the bilges are fitted beneath the carpet in the accommodation areas. Condensation ~ the best defence against damp and condensation is good ventilation. Ventilation ~ is provided by a mixture of opening portlights and hatches when not at sea and by forced air extraction systems fitted to the galley and shower compartments (see figure 1.4). The main engine room and lazarette are ventilated using low level natural air flow and forced air extraction. Batteries are stored in ventilated boxes. See chapters 2 and 3. The galley (hob extractor) and shower compartment extractor fans are isolated on the secondary circuit breaker panel. See Chapter 3. Yachts must be ventilated as often as possible allowing fresh air to enter the yacht through portlights, hatches and the saloon sliding door. Before putting to sea, you must ensure that all open portlights, hatches and the sliding saloon door are closed and secured in their watertight position. Compartments, lockers and drawers must be opened wherever possible to allow fresh air to circulate. When you are in port and intend leaving the yacht unattended and ventilated ~ you should use the hatches. Hatches have a vent setting where they may be left slightly open and then locked. Leaving portlights and windows open risks the ingress of water. 1.3.2 Galley, Refrigeration and Food Preparation Equipment All galley, refrigeration and food preparation equipment including work surfaces must be cleaned down frequently. It is important that the galley is kept tidy and that utensils are correctly stowed after use. The galley is equipped with an electric refrigerator with icebox (‘REFRIGERATION’) (1-11) (1-12) (the refrigeration is dual-powered, either 24-volt DC or 230-volt AC via a power converter). A 230-volt AC 3-zone ceramic hob with overhead extractor fan (‘HOB’ and ‘EXTRACTOR FAN’) (1-13) (1-14) and a combination microwave / conventional oven with grill (‘MICROWAVE’) (1-13). See OEM literature. 1-11 230-VOLT AC SWITCH PANEL 1-12 24-VOLT DC SWITCH PANEL The deck saloon is fitted with a dual voltage cocktail refrigerator (‘REFRIGERATION’) (1-11) (1-12) and the flybridge wetbar with a 24-volt DC refrigerated cool box (‘REFRIGERATION’) (1-12) and 230-volt AC barbecue (‘BBQ’) (1-15). See OEM literature. 724994 - ISSUE B - 07/13 35
  37. 37. FIGURE 1.4 - FORWARD FORCED AIR VENTILATION 3 1. 2. 3. 1 36 FORWARD SHOWER COMPARTMENT EXTRACTOR FAN STATEROOM SHOWER COMPARTMENT EXTRACTOR FAN AIR OUT VENT 2 OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS SECTION 1, CHAPTER 1 PRINCESS 56 OWNER’S HANDBOOK 724994 - ISSUE B - 07/13
  38. 38. OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS SECTION 1, CHAPTER 1 PRINCESS 56 OWNER’S HANDBOOK 1-13 230-VOLT AC SWITCH PANEL 1-14 230-VOLT AC SWITCH PANEL 1-16 1-17 1-15 230-VOLT AC SWITCH PANEL Optionally a second refrigerator* may be fitted in the galley, an icemaker* in the saloon and a washer/dryer* fitted in the utility space under the lower accommodation stairway. See chapter 6. Where your yacht is fitted with a vented tumble dryer (with a vent duct to the outside of the yacht); the lint filter (where fitted) must be cleaned before and after each drying cycle. THE EXHAUST DUCT MUST BE INSPECTED AND CLEANED EVERY TWENTY FOUR HOURS OF USE. Work surfaces - never attempt to sit or stand on work surfaces as they are not designed to take the weight of crew. You should always use cutting boards where using a knife, hot pads or trivets under hot saucepans and always place felt protectors under hard objects capable of marking the surface. Avoid dragging or sliding hard objects across the work surfaces. Hob units - where the hob unit is fitted with a cover, this must be lifted before use and not lowered until the cooking surface has completely cooled. Ensure that the cover is lowered before getting underway. 1.3.3 Hull Windows Great care must be taken when mooring, to ensure that fenders do not apply any pressure to the hull windows (1-16) (1-17). Where yachts are moored against high harbour walls or where other craft are moored alongside, all necessary precautions must be taken to avoid damage to the integrity of the windows and their surfaces. Opening windows and portlights must be closed before getting underway. CAUTION - FENDERS - ensure that the fenders do not come into contact with the hull windows. 724994 - ISSUE B - 07/13 37
  39. 39. OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS SECTION 1, CHAPTER 1 PRINCESS 56 OWNER’S HANDBOOK 1.3.4 Helm Windows The helm windows are electrically operated using rocker switches fitted at the helm (1-18). The windows are powered by the 24-volt DC electrical system (auxiliary / domestic batteries) and are isolated on the secondary circuit breaker panel. See Chapter 3. 1.3.5 1-18 Domestic and Navigation Lighting The domestic and machinery space lighting is 24-volt DC, isolated by switches (1-19) (1-20) (1-21) on the 24-volt DC switch panel and switched on and off by light switches locally. Cabin spot lighting (downlights) are fitted with Xenon bulbs. Xenon burns at a lower temperature than it’s halogen equivalents, has a longer operational life expectancy and is more tolerant of voltage spikes. When ‘hooked-up’ to a shorepower supply the cabin lighting is powered using the 75-amp battery charger. 1-19 24-VOLT DC SWITCH PANEL 1-20 230-VOLT AC SWITCH PANEL 1-21 230-VOLT AC SWITCH PANEL Navigation lights - and navigation instrument lights are switched on using switches (1-21) (1-23) fitted at the main helm. 1-22 1.3.6 1-23 Audiovisual Equipment The deck saloon is fitted with LCD TV set (230-volt AC only) as standard (a powered amplifier is fitted locally to boost signal strength / reception). Also fitted as standard in the saloon, is a radio / DVD entertainment system powered by the 24-volt DC system (fades between the deck saloon and flybridge speakers). 24-volt to 12-volt converters, are provided for all 12volt devices in the electrical space. See OEM literature. 1.4 ENVIRONMENTAL CONSIDERATIONS 1.4.1 Discharge and Disposal of Waste Materials Most countries throughout the world legislate to control the discharge of waste material from seagoing craft and in many places the requirements to comply are being made increasingly stringent and backed by punitive fines. Non-biodegradable waste ~ wherever possible this should be retained aboard and jettisoned only in approved disposal or recycling points ashore. Biodegradable waste ~ ‘because it is biodegradable’ is commonly quoted as a justification for throwing food scraps overboard. However, especially in areas of dense yachting concentration, there is increasing proof that this is reducing the available free oxygen in the water locally. 38 724994 - ISSUE B - 07/13
  40. 40. SECTION 1, CHAPTER 1 OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS PRINCESS 56 OWNER’S HANDBOOK CAUTION - DISCHARGE AND DISPOSAL OF WASTE MATERIALS - where food has to be disposed of overboard (and most European countries now prohibit such disposal within twelve miles of their coastlines), it must be cut-up as small as possible to speed its breakdown. 724994 - ISSUE B - 07/13 39
  41. 41. OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS SECTION 1, CHAPTER 1 PRINCESS 56 OWNER’S HANDBOOK 40 724994 - ISSUE B - 07/13
  42. 42. SECTION 1, CHAPTER 2 OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS PRINCESS 56 OWNER’S HANDBOOK 2. MAIN ENGINES, CONTROLS, INSTRUMENTATION AND ALLIED EQUIPMENT 2.1 INTRODUCTION This chapter contains the necessary information required to operate the main engines, controls and ancillary systems in safety and with consideration to the environment. Refer to Chapter 9 for maintenance procedures. Before operating the systems and equipment described, you must familiarise yourself with the necessary procedures and supporting information given in the OEM literature. This Chapter covers engines manufactured by Caterpillar, MAN and Volvo Penta. Failure to follow the specified procedures could result in personal injury or damage to property or the equipment. If you are in any doubt about any operation or the information provided, please contact your Princess distributor directly, who will be able to assist you with an explanation or will demonstrate the operation. 2.2 MAIN ENGINE SYSTEM Your yacht is fitted with twin turbocharged marine diesel engines driving through gearboxes (reversing gear) with counterrotating propeller shafts. The engine options fitted are: Twin Caterpillar C12 ACERT (2 x 715mhp) - Speed range: 28–29 knots † Twin MAN R6-800 (2 x 800mhp) - Speed range: data not available Twin Volvo D13-800 (2 x 800mhp) - Speed range: 31–33 knots † † Engine cruising range and speed ~ hull speed and range can vary widely according to the prevailing conditions and the number of crew and provisions carried onboard. Diesel fuel used for the generating set will reduce the yacht’s range still further. To keep your main engines running at their optimum, it is important that the engines are provided with an adequate supply of clean, cool air. For this reason, it is vital that the engine room venting and warm-air blower fans are kept free from obstruction and in good working order. Only use the correct specification fuel approved by the OEM. Poor fuel gives poor performance and can damage the engine. Only use engine oils and coolants recommended by the OEM. If you are at all in doubt, you should contact your Princess distributor who will be happy to help you with this matter. The same applies to replacement filters and any parts that are required to repair or maintain the engines. Apart from the basic concerns regarding safety, use of unauthorised parts or fluids will invalidate the warranty of any equipment in question. WARNING - MAIN ENGINES - always turn the engines off before starting service procedures. Immobilise the engines by turning off the power supply to the engines using the engine start battery isolator switch on the 24-volt DC switch panel. Never approach a running engine. Loose clothing, jewellery etcetera can become entangled in rotating parts and cause serious personal injury. Set up a warning notice at the helms. CAUTION - AVOID BURNS - take precautions to avoid hot surfaces and liquids in supply lines. Familiarise yourself with all risk factors, such as rotating parts and hot surfaces (for example: the turbochargers, charge pipes, starter elements, charge air coolers, intake pipes and the exhaust pipes). CAUTION - CLEANING - never use a high-pressure water-jet to wash down the main engines or any associated components. 2.2.1 Lubrication and Consumables Marine diesel engines and gearboxes are subject to greater wear and tear than conventional motor engines. The reason for this is that they are frequently run intensively for short periods and then laid-up for long periods. It is therefore important to use the OEM recommended oils , coolants and greases at the correct frequency. 724994 - ISSUE B - 07/13 41
  43. 43. OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS SECTION 1, CHAPTER 2 PRINCESS 56 OWNER’S HANDBOOK Oil filters ~ Prevent impurities in the oil from circulating through the engine’s lubrication system. Oil filters are therefore of vital importance to the operation and service life of the engines. To regularly replace the oil filter will help prevent breakdowns and engine wear. See OEM literature. CAUTION - LUBRICATION SYSTEM - hot oil can cause severe burns. Avoid skin contact with hot oil. Ensure that the lubrication system is not under pressure before commencing work on it. Never start to operate an engine with the oil filler cap removed, otherwise oil could be ejected. 2.2.2 Air System The main engines are fitted with air filters (2-01) to stop airborne dirt and moisture being sucked into their cylinders. Every minute that the main engines are running, the air filters clean thousands of litres of air of the dust and small dirt particles that would otherwise quickly result in prematurely worn out engines. See OEM literature. 2.2.3 2-01 VOLVO OPTION Fuel System Fuel is stored in two fuel tanks (2-02) (combined capacity: 2650L / 582 gal / 699 US gal) in the engine room port and starboard. Tanks are fitted with breathers vented topside [breather pipes are fitted with spit-stop filters (2-03)]. The tanks are interlinked by a balance pipe (fitted with a centreline stopcock). The balance pipe must be kept closed and only opened in the event of an emergency. For example, to allow a single engine to draw fuel from both port and starboard tanks (in the event of an engine failure). Tanks are fitted with drain cocks (2-04) for cleaning the tanks (sump draw-off valves). See figures 2.1 to 2.2. 2-03 2-02 2-04 Fuel tank content is monitored and displayed on the engine manufacturers display(s) at the main helm and on conventional gauges at the flybridge. Guages must only be used to approximate the amount of fuel in the tanks (especially whilst underway). CAUTION - FUEL GAUGE READINGS - the fuel gauges can read slightly high when the yacht is on the plane and appear to drop when the yacht slows or comes to a stop. Using feed pumps, the main engines draw fresh diesel fuel from the fuel tanks, through fuel suction lines into the bulkheadmounted fuel filters / water separators (2-05), onto the engine-mounted fuel filters and into the injectors. Fuel feed pipes are fitted with remotely operated stopcocks. 42 724994 - ISSUE B - 07/13
  44. 44. OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS SECTION 1, CHAPTER 2 PRINCESS 56 OWNER’S HANDBOOK FIGURE 2.1 - FUEL SYSTEM 1 2 1 3 3 4 5 5 6 7 7 11 8 9 9 13 12 11 10 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 724994 - ISSUE B - 07/13 MAIN ENGINE BULKHEAD MOUNTED FUEL FILTER / WATER SEPARATORS FUEL TANK BALANCE PIPE BALL VALVE SPIT-STOP FILTER UNITS MAIN ENGINE FUEL FEED FUEL TANKS MAIN ENGINE FUEL RETURN FUEL TANK DECK FILLERS MAIN ENGINE FUEL FEED STOPCOCK FUEL TANK BREATHERS GENERATOR FUEL FEED GENERATOR FUEL RETURN GENERATOR BULKHEAD MOUNTED FUEL FILTER / WATER SEPARATOR GENERATOR FUEL FEED STOPCOCK 43
  45. 45. 44 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 7 6 8 5 A B D 7 MAIN ENGINE FUEL RETURNS FUEL TANK BALANCE PIPE MAIN ENGINE FUEL FEEDS AND RETURNS MAIN ENGINE FUEL FEEDS FUEL TANK BREATHERS FUEL TANK DECK FILLERS GENERATOR FUEL FEED GENERATOR FUEL RETURN FIGURE 2.2 - FUEL SYSTEM C F D 1 �” ELBOW 3 E �” FUELCOCK ½” FUELCOCK 1” BALL VALVE ¾” BALL VALVE �” BLANKING PLUG A 4 3 2 B C D E F 1 4 A D F C D 5 F 5 6 OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS SECTION 1, CHAPTER 2 PRINCESS 56 OWNER’S HANDBOOK 724994 - ISSUE B - 07/13
  46. 46. OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS SECTION 1, CHAPTER 2 PRINCESS 56 OWNER’S HANDBOOK CAUTIONS - FUEL SYSTEM 1. 2. 2-05 Always use protective gloves when tracing leaks. Liquids ejected under pressure can penetrate body tissue and cause serious injury. Always use fuels recommended by the OEM. The use of incorrect or lower quality fuels can damage the engines. 1 CAUTION - FUEL TANK BREATHERS - ensure that the breather vents are never obstructed and the spit-stop filters are maintained correctly. 2 Fuel stopcocks - whilst the yacht is in use, the fuel stopcocks (2-06) should be left in the open position and only closed in an emergency (such as an engine room fire) or when carrying out maintenance or repairs. When leaving the yacht for extended periods however, fuelcocks must only be closed. Fuel stopcocks are closed by pulling out fully the ‘T’ handle controls (2-07) (fitted in the cockpit locker housing the bilge emergency manual bilge pump ans manual fire extinguisher release system). And opened, by fully returning the handles. CAUTION - FUEL STOPCOCKS - never turn off the fuel feed pipe stopcocks whilst the engines are running, except for maintenance, in an emergency (such as a fuel leakage or fire) or in the event an engine runson and cannot be stopped by any other means. 3 1. 2. 3. CHANGE OVER LEVER INSPECTION BOWL / SENSOR DRAIN COCK 2-06 Bulkhead and engine-mounted fine fuel filters ~ each engine is fitted with a dual filtration process, twin bulkhead-mounted fuel filters / water separators and an engine-mounted fine fuel filters (see engine OEM literature). Fuel filters prevent impurities in the fuel from circulating through the engine fuel system. Fuel filters are therefore of vital importance to the operation and service life of the engines. To regularly replace the fuel filter will help prevent breakdowns and engine wear. See OEM literature. The bulkhead fuel filters / water separators will also prevent water and other impurities entering the fuel system ~ even fresh fuel can be contaminated by water and debris. To clean filters, they must be backflushed in accordance with the OEM literature. 2-07 Fuel contamination sensors are fitted to the fuel filters / water separators with alarms at the helm next to the rudder position indicator. Refuelling and fuel storage ~ when taking on fuel, reduce the rate of filling well before you sense the tanks are full. Overfilling will flush the surplus fuel from the tanks and could force it out through the breathers / spit-stop filters. When taking on fuel: 1. 724994 - ISSUE B - 07/13 1 1. 2. 3. 2 3 PORT MAIN ENGINE (CLOSED) GENERATOR SET (OPEN) STARBOARD MAIN ENGINE (OPEN) The filler caps are fitted (2-08) on both the port and starboard decks (marked ‘DIESEL’). Should there be any spillage, after replacing the filler caps, rinse thoroughly with freshwater. 45
  47. 47. OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS SECTION 1, CHAPTER 2 PRINCESS 56 OWNER’S HANDBOOK 2. Ensure the main engines and / or generator are switched off. 3. To reduce the risk of water condensing in the tanks and contaminating the fuel, the fuel tanks must be kept as near full as possible, especially during the winter months and any lay-up period. 2-08 Fuel usage ~ with marine diesel engines, fuel consumption is determined by a calculation of ‘running time’ and ‘engine revolutions’, rather than ‘distance-made-good-over-the-ground’. As this can sometimes difficult to gauge, you must consider only 80% of your yacht’s fuel capacity as usable and plan accordingly. DANGER - DIESEL FUEL - do not smoke near fuel tanks or fuel-burning equipment or in areas sharing ventilation with such equipment. Keep flames, sparks, pilot flames, electrical arcs and switches and all other sources of ignition well away. Never store diesel fuel or other flammable materials in poorly ventilated lockers. Fuel must only be stored in purpose made containers. 2.2.4 Cooling System The cooling system (or raw-water system) is an extremely important part of the engine assembly. A correct working temperature contributes to better fuel economy and a longer operational life span of the engine. See figure 2.3. 2-9 Engine cooling is achieved through water-cooling. Enclosed freshwater jackets transfer heat via circulating pumps and heat exchangers. The rawwater (seawater) system utilises seawater pumps drawing raw-water from the inlet seacocks (2-09), through bulkhead mounted raw-water strainers (2-10) (these units are fitted with clear plastic tops and must be checked and emptied daily for debris, such as weed and small crustacea). This collected debris, if not removed, can block the raw-water intakes. The raw-water passes through the heat exchangers (engines and gearboxes) transferring the waste heat from the enclosed freshwater jackets and then mixed with the exhaust gases via the manifold to help cool the exhaust gases. This cooling system also provides heated freshwater via take off and return valves for the domestic hot water system using a calorifier. The calorifier operates in an identical manner to the engine / gearbox heat exchangers, heating the domestic freshwater in the calorifiers storage tank. See Chapters 4 and 11. 2-10 The cooling system also provides lubrication water for the water-lubricated shaft seals. And via the heat exchanger on the starboard engine to the oil cooler for the hydraulic steering system. CAUTIONS - COOLING SYSTEM 1. 2. 46 Do not open the coolant filler caps when the main engines are hot. Steam or hot coolant can spray out, as system pressure is lost. Open filler caps slowly and release coolant system pressure. If your yacht is taken under tow for any reason, the raw-water inlet seacocks must be shut. 724994 - ISSUE B - 07/13
  48. 48. 1. 2. 3. 4. 724994 - ISSUE B - 07/13 1 RAW-WATER FEED RAW-WATER STRAINERS RAW-WATER INLET SEACOCKS MAIN ENGINES FIGURE 2.3 - COOLING SYSTEM 2 3 4 SECTION 1, CHAPTER 2 OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS PRINCESS 56 OWNER’S HANDBOOK 47
  49. 49. OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS SECTION 1, CHAPTER 2 PRINCESS 56 OWNER’S HANDBOOK 2.2.5 Exhaust System The heated raw-water from the cooling system is directed over the exhaust manifolds via the exhaust elbows to the dual-chamber exhaust silencers (2-11), where the temperature of the exhaust gases is reduced sufficiently to allow the use of synthetic hoses. The heated raw-water and exhaust gases are then expelled through the hull exhaust outlets aft. See figures 2.4 and 2.5. 2-11 VOLVO OPTION This method of cooling works as an extremely effective silencer, reducing exhaust noise substantially. The dual-chamber exhaust silencers also function as effective water-locks. DANGER - EXHAUST GASES / CARBON MONOXIDE RISK - EXHAUST GAS IS DEADLY! - engine exhaust contains carbon monoxide, a poisonous, odourless and colourless gas that can cause unconsciousness and death. Symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning include dizziness, throbbing in temples, nausea, muscular twitching, headache, vomiting, weakness, trouble thinking clearly and sleepiness. Get everyone out into fresh air immediately if anyone experiences any of these symptoms. Seek medical attention if symptoms persist. 2-12 CAUTION - DUAL-CHAMBER EXHAUST SILENCERS - silencers are fitted with drain taps (2-12) which drain directly into the bilge. These must be opened to drain off excess water in the silencer after over cranking engines, failure to do so may cause the silencer to back fill the excess water into the main engines. Drain taps must be left in the open position during lifting, long lay up periods and transportation by road. 2.2.6 Engine Electrics The main engines use 4 x 12-volt heavy-duty batteries wired in series to give 24-volts DC for starting (installed in a ventilated box). The batteries are charged by AC powered battery charger and by the engine mounted alternators whilst the engines are running. The alternators, are connected to the engine start batteries via the engine starter motors and an automatic charge relay (2-13). See Chapter 3. 2-13 If the battery voltage drops below 21-volts DC then an automatic charge relay, fitted in the engine start master switch box in the engine room, will disconnect to protect the batteries (both engine start and the domestic / auxiliary battery banks). If the start batteries are low then the main engines will need to be started to charge them. In the event that the engine start batteries are too low to start the main engines, press the covered (‘BATTERY LINK’) momentary switch (2-14) at the helms. This parallels the engine start and the domestic / auxiliary batteries for 30 seconds, providing a temporary boost to the engine start batteries, allowing you to start the main engines. Engines must however, be cranked and started during this 30 second boost period. See Chapter 3. 2-14 Where the batteries fall below 21-volts DC they must be professional checked and replaced as necessary. 48 724994 - ISSUE B - 07/13
  50. 50. 1. 2. 3. 724994 - ISSUE B - 07/13 1 EXHAUST RISERS DUAL-CHAMBER EXHAUST SILENCERS EXHAUST OUTLETS FIGURE 2.4 - EXHAUST SYSTEM (VOLVO OPTION) 1 1 2 2 3 3 SECTION 1, CHAPTER 2 OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS PRINCESS 56 OWNER’S HANDBOOK 49
  51. 51. 50 1. 2. 3. EXHAUST RISERS DUAL-CHAMBER EXHAUST SILENCERS EXHAUST OUTLETS FIGURE 2.5 - EXHAUST SYSTEM (CAT OPTION) 1 1 2 2 3 3 OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS SECTION 1, CHAPTER 2 PRINCESS 56 OWNER’S HANDBOOK 724994 - ISSUE B - 07/13
  52. 52. OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS SECTION 1, CHAPTER 2 PRINCESS 56 OWNER’S HANDBOOK DANGER - ENGINE ELECTRICS - never cause a naked flame or electrical sparking near batteries. Never smoke in proximity to the batteries. Batteries give off hydrogen gas during charging which when mixed with air can form an explosive gas ~ oxyhydrogen. This gas is easily ignited and highly volatile. Incorrect connection of a battery can cause a single spark, which is sufficient to cause an explosion with resulting damage. Do not shift the connections when attempting to start the engine (spark risk) and do not lean over any of the batteries. See OEM literature. CAUTIONS 1. 2. You must always use protective goggles when charging and handling batteries. The battery electrolyte should it leak contains extremely corrosive sulphuric acid. If this should come into contact with the skin, immediately wash with soap and plenty of water. If battery acid comes into contact with the eyes, immediately flush with plenty of water and obtain medical assistance without delay. 3. 2.3 Never interfere with the terminals when the engines are running. A high-energy pulse may be generated which will damage the system. Shutdown the main engines and switch off the power at the main switches before carrying out any work on the electrical system. CONTROLS AND INSTRUMENTATION Your yacht is fitted with twin-lever throttle controls for acceleration and gear changing. See OEM literature. The controls are fitted with a neutral safety switch that prevents unintentional manoeuvring of the yacht by only permitting the engines to start when the throttle control levers are in neutral. Actuators for the throttles along with the engine control electronics are located in the control boxes in the engine room (2-15) (with Volvo Penta engines the controls are built into the throttles and engine mounted). Caterpillar engines are fitted with junction boxes (2-16) in the engine room. Engine ignitions, trim controls, monitoring instruments, gauges and alarms are located at the helms. Alarms are fitted to warn of any malfunction in the primary operations of the main engines, such as oil pressure and coolant levels. There are other important controls to consider, such as the engine raw-water (seawater) inlet seacocks, fuel stopcocks and battery master switches. In the event of an emergency, both the owner and the crew should identify these controls. 2.3.1 Throttle Controls The helm is fitted with twin single-lever throttle / gear controls (2-17) (2-18) electronically operate throttle and gear servos. Caterpillar engines are fitted with a back-up throttle panel (2-19) at the helm. See OEM literature for operating instructions. 2-15 CAT OPTION 2-16 2-17 CAT OPTION VOLVO OPTION 1 2 3 CAUTION - CALIBRATION - all electronic engine controls are calibrated prior to the delivery of your yacht. See OEM literature. 724994 - ISSUE B - 07/13 1. 2. 3. FORWARD GEAR & THROTTLE NEUTRAL REVERSE GEAR & THROTTLE 51
  53. 53. OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS SECTION 1, CHAPTER 2 PRINCESS 56 OWNER’S HANDBOOK 2-18 2-19 CAT OPTION 2-21 E-KEY 2-22 CAT OPTION LOWER HELM 2-23 VOLVO OPTION 2-24 VOLVO OPTION 1 2 3 2-20 1. 2. 3. 2.3.2 FORWARD GEAR & THROTTLE NEUTRAL REVERSE GEAR & THROTTLE Instrumentation The instruments fitted at the main helm and / or the flybridge include: 1. Engine monitoring / control panels. See OEM literature. 2. Engine coolant temperature gauges. 3. Oil pressure gauges. 4. Voltmeters. 5. Ignitions - Caterpillar and MAN engines are provided with key switches (2-20) with built-in restart inhibitor (starter motor protection) at the lower helm only. Engine ‘START’ and ‘STOP’ buttons are provided at the lower helm and flybridge. See OEM literature. Volvo engines use a single e-Key (2-21) (keyless ignition system). Sweep the e-Key in front of the e-Key panel (2-22) to unlock the system – then press the ‘IGNITION’ button followed by the ‘STOP/START’ button to start the main engines. Reverse the procedure to stop the engines. Sweep the e-Key in front of the e-Key panel to lock the system. 6. Data displays / tachometers (2-24). 7. Fuel gauges. 8. Helm (rudder position) indicator (2-24). Alarms ~ see OEM literature for details concerning engine specific alarms (see figure 2.6). If an alarm sounds, the alarm will continue until the malfunction is corrected. On receipt of an engine (or general alarm), the main engines must be stopped immediately, the alarm acknowledged and the fault investigated and rectified. 52 724994 - ISSUE B - 07/13
  54. 54. OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS SECTION 1, CHAPTER 2 PRINCESS 56 OWNER’S HANDBOOK FIGURE 2.6 - GENERIC ALARMS BATHING PLATFORM WITH GARAGE EXHAUST OVER HEAT BATHING PLATFORM FIRE BATHING PLATFORM OVERRIDE GROUP ALARM OR SEA READINESS ALARM, BATHING PLATFORM & PORT HOLES BATTERY OR IGNITION PORT HOLES BATTERY LINK STEERING ALARM BILGE TRANSOM DOOR DIAGNOSTIC WATER IN FUEL EMERGENCY STOP PLATFORM READY ENGINE ALARM 724994 - ISSUE B - 07/13 53

×