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Presentation for East Sweden Business Region - Innovation and Regional Development - 2013-09-03

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Presentation on innovation and regional development to the leadership of the east Sweden business region.

Presentation on innovation and regional development to the leadership of the east Sweden business region.

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  • Vi som är här är Magnus Penker, Jan Snygg och Jörgen Eriksson.Vi undervisar alla tre vid den tredagarskurs i innovation management som vi ger genom DFK. Datum för kursen är 12-13 oktober samt 27 oktober. Jan Snygg är huvudlärare.Jag vill även nämna att Jan sitter i den svenska kommittén för standardisering av Innovation Management i Europa och deltar i standardiseringen av Innovation Management som ISO-9000 liknande verktyg.
  • Litteraturen visar många vägar till att lyckas med innovation.In search of Excellence – inte samma företag tio år senare
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    • 1. This document is solely for the use of the receiver. No part of it may be circulated, quoted, or reproduced for distribution outside the receivers organisation without prior written approval from Bearing Consulting Ltd. 2013 Bearing Consulting Ltd. Proprietary and Confidential. All Rights Reserved Innovation and Regional Development Steningevik, September 3, 2013 “..because the execution of an idea is always more important than the brilliance of the thought..” (Harvard Business Publishing – Morgan, Levitt & Maleck – INVEST model)
    • 2. Sub heading 4 Transformation into knowledge economy Instruktion från Lars-Göran Larsson i augusti: ”Baserat på historik, hur ser en innovationsbaserad transformation in i ett framtida informationssamhälle ut? Hur kan det gå till? - Hur kopplar vi RIS3 till detta i praktiken. - Hur gör Östergötland för att komma dit... med syfte att bli en ledande region i ett europeiskt perspektiv.”
    • 3. Sub heading 5 Transformation into knowledge economy R&D Innovation Productivity Transformati on from labour to machines Talent development Economic Growth Sustainable development Quality of life
    • 4. 6 1. Globalisation and Hyper Competition 2. Business in Hyper Competitive Markets 3. What do we mean with Innovation? 4. What Hyper Competition means for places 5. The Importance of shares Visions 6. The EU Horizon 2020 Strategy 7. Example: Croatia entering the EU 8. Example: African Model for Science Parks 9. Example: Karolinska Institutet Science Park Agenda
    • 5. This document is solely for the use of the receiver. No part of it may be circulated, quoted, or reproduced for distribution outside the receivers organisation without prior written approval from Bearing Consulting Ltd. 2012 Bearing Consulting Ltd. Proprietary and Confidential. All Rights Reserved Globalisation and Hyper Competition
    • 6. Sub heading 8 Globalisation In 2013, for the first time since the industrial revolution in the 19th century, emerging economies will produce the majority of the world’s goods and services.
    • 7. Sub heading 9 Globalisation Emerging economies are no longer emerging. They are leading.
    • 8. Sub heading 10 Globalisation It took a thousand years for the world’s economic centre of gravity to shift from Asia to Europe culminating with the industrial revolution. But now that trend is reversing itself, and at a stunning speed.
    • 9. Sub heading 11 TheTopTen Leaders of Global Growth Source: Financial Times
    • 10. Sub heading 12 TheTopTen Leaders of Global Growth Source: Financial Times
    • 11. Sub heading 13 TheTopTen Leaders of Global Growth Source: Financial Times
    • 12. Sub heading 14 TheTopTen Leaders of Global Growth Source: Financial Times
    • 13. 15 Why hyper competition? • Globalisation – less trade barriers and efficient transport (e.g. containers) • Speed of hyper connected communication and the pace of modern business • DisruptiveTechnologies A new technology that has a serious impact on the status quo and changes the way people have been dealing with something, perhaps for decades Some drivers of hyper competition
    • 14. Sub heading 16 European Union growth rates since 2001 Source: The Economist
    • 15. Sub heading 17 Worlds fastest growing economies Source: The Economist
    • 16. Sub heading 18 Africa – the fastest billion Source: Renaissance Capital In the book The Fastest Billion the authors outlines the African continent’s growth trajectory over 30 years. Projections indicate that Africa is already attracting more foreign investments than India and Bangladesh owing to a faster growth rate. The continent, the authors say, has the unique advantage of “leapfrogging” through various stages of economic development, which the more developed western states had to go through in growing their economies over decades. Today s public and private sector leaders in Africa are Harvard graduates and often have PhD degrees
    • 17. Sub heading 19 Sverige jämfört med USA och Frankrike Source: OECD
    • 18. Sub heading 20 Centrum för teknikinnovation är nu i Asien Källa: Financial Times 2013-05-30
    • 19. This document is solely for the use of the receiver. No part of it may be circulated, quoted, or reproduced for distribution outside the receivers organisation without prior written approval from Bearing Consulting Ltd. 2013 Bearing Consulting Ltd. Proprietary and Confidential. All Rights Reserved The Challenge: Business in hyper competitive markets
    • 20. 22 Corporate world dominance In the year 1994, Motorola was world leader in (analogue) mobiles, seven years later Nokia was world leader in (digital) mobiles 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% Market shares 1994 Market Shares 2001 Motorola Nokia
    • 21. 23 From #1 to crises in less than three years… Why ? Nokia share price September 3, 2013: Microsoft buys Nokia s handset division
    • 22. 24 Apple stock price down more than 40%
    • 23. 25 “Either you innovate or you’re in commodity hell. If you do what everyone else does, you have a low-margin business.That’s not where you want to be.” Sam Palmisano, former CEO IBM Hyper competition
    • 24. 26 “Managing innovation better may be the only way out of the abyss called commodity hell” Jeffrey R. Immelt, CEO General Electric Hyper competition
    • 25. Sub heading 27 Innovation is a key driver of well-being and growth
    • 26. This document is solely for the use of the receiver. No part of it may be circulated, quoted, or reproduced for distribution outside the receivers organisation without prior written approval from Bearing Consulting Ltd. 2013 Bearing Consulting Ltd. Proprietary and Confidential. All Rights Reserved What do we mean with innovation?
    • 27. 29 What is Innovation? The literature is not giving us a consistent definition
    • 28. 30 Innovation is creative destruction, where entrepreneurs combine existing elements in new ways… After Joseph Schumpeter (1883 – 1950) The definition
    • 29. 31 En definition... Innovation versus Invention
    • 30. 33 Types of innovation
    • 31. 34 The S-curve Emergent Growth Mature Performance/Valueoffering Effort / Time Business of the future (EXPLORATORY) Ongoing business (EXPLOITATIVE) Source: Tovstiga (2007)
    • 32. This document is solely for the use of the receiver. No part of it may be circulated, quoted, or reproduced for distribution outside the receivers organisation without prior written approval from Bearing Consulting Ltd. 2013 Bearing Consulting Ltd. Proprietary and Confidential. All Rights Reserved What hyper competition means for places
    • 33. Sub heading 36 The innovation system We live in hypercompetitive global markets Hyper competition
    • 34. 37 You need to understand the future place climate
    • 35. 38 Seattle in the 1970s – a place in decline In the 1970s Seattle became synonymous with urban decline
    • 36. 39 Seattle – example of success World class institutions and companies based in Seattle: - Microsoft (Redmond) - Amazon.com - Starbucks - Nordstroms Today, Seattle is one of the wealthier and most productive metropolitan areas in the United States. - Per-capita income is 25 percent above the average - Per-capita productivity is 37 percent above the average Cities like Seattle succeed by attracting talented institutions and people who educate and employ one another and by building sustainable innovation systems.
    • 37. Sub heading 40 The European perspective The European Unions previous cohesion policy did not achieve the intended results
    • 38. 41 The Challenge The global competition of cities is estimated to host 2,7 million towns, 3 thousand large cities and 455 large metropolitan areas with a population over one million. All of them compete in the struggle for attention and this is not limited to the contest between countries and cities. This competitive environment makes it important for places, no matter their size or composition, to clearly differentiate and to convey why they are relevant and valued options. The competition between places used to be about comparative advantages, but in the age of globalisation it is about competitive advantage.
    • 39. 42 To achieve Place Excellence requires innovation Innovation
    • 40. Sub heading 43 Quad Helix4
    • 41. This document is solely for the use of the receiver. No part of it may be circulated, quoted, or reproduced for distribution outside the receivers organisation without prior written approval from Bearing Consulting Ltd. 2013 Bearing Consulting Ltd. Proprietary and Confidential. All Rights Reserved The Importance of sharedVisions
    • 42. Sub heading 45 The Power of Visions “Vision without action is merely a dream. Action without vision merely passes the time. Vision with action can change the world.” - Joel Barker, Futurist, Author Vision Strategy Plans and implementation
    • 43. 46 Strategy
    • 44. 47 Implementation of Europe Horizon 2020 Growth Strategy • National Innovation Strategy • Regional Development Programs • Regional Innovation Strategies • Regional Development Plans • Local Development Plans Country Region Local Community EU Horizon 2020 Frame Work ... a bottom up and top down cooperative process
    • 45. 48 The work model to achieve Place Excellence Assets Activities Actors Governance
    • 46. 49 Always start with yourTarget Markets City branding is the process of image communication to a target market All places compete with other places for people (visitors, residents), resources, and business. Which are the target markets of your place?
    • 47. 50 Perform a sweet spot analysis for differentiation Customers’ needs Competitive places offerings Your own city assets and capabilities Sweet Spot Where your city meets target markets needs in a way in which your competitors cannot What? Where? Why? How? 1 2 3 Sweet spot = unique spot How to protect/define boundary 1,2,3 Inspired by: Collis & Rukstad (2008). Can You Say What Your Strategy Is?, HBR (April 2008)
    • 48. This document is solely for the use of the receiver. No part of it may be circulated, quoted, or reproduced for distribution outside the receivers organisation without prior written approval from Bearing Consulting Ltd. 2013 Bearing Consulting Ltd. Proprietary and Confidential. All Rights Reserved The EU Horizon 2020 strategy
    • 49. Sub heading 52 The European perspective “Europe is facing a moment of transformation. The crises has wiped out years of economic and social progress and exposed structural weaknesses in Europe s economy. In the meantime, the world is moving fast and long-term challenges such as globalisation, pressure on resources, population ageing, are intensifying.” - Quote from Europe 2020 Strategy
    • 50. Sub heading 53 The European perspective The EU has set out its vision for Europe s economy in the Europe 2020 Strategy, which aims at confronting structural weaknesses through progress in three mutually reinforcing priorities: 1. Smart Growth, based on knowledge and innovation 2. Sustainable growth, promoting a more resource efficient, greener and competitive economy 3. Inclusive growth, fostering a high employment economy delivering economic, social and territorial cohesion
    • 51. Sub heading 54 The European perspective Investing more in research, innovation and entrepreneurship is at the heart of Europe 2020 and a crucial part of Europe s response to the economic crises. So is having a strategic and integrated approach to innovation that maximizes European, national and regional research and innovation potential. It is about enhancing Europe s capacity to deliver smart, sustainable and inclusive growth, through the concept of smart specialization.
    • 52. Sub heading 55 Specialization in Europe
    • 53. Sub heading 56 The European perspective A national / regional strategy for smart specialization (RIS3) can be designed following a number of practical steps: 1. The analysis of the national / regional context and potential for innovation. 2. The set-up of a sound and inclusive governance structure. 3. The production of a shared vision about the future of the country / region. 4. The selection of a limited number of priorities for national / regional development. 5. The establishment of suitable policy mixes. 6. The integration of monitoring and evaluation mechanisms.
    • 54. 57 Budget for Cohesion Policy post–2013 Cohesion Policy 33 % (€336 billion) Connecting Europe Facility 4 % (€40 billion) Other policies (agriculture, research, extern al etc.) 63 % (€649 billion) Cohesion policy within total EU budget 2014-2020
    • 55. Sub heading 58 The European perspective NEW EU MEMBER STATE JULY 2013
    • 56. Sub heading 59 Target regions4 3 categories of regions < 75 % of EU averageGDP/capita* *index EU27=100 75-90 % > 90 % Less developed regions Transition regions More developed regions
    • 57. 60 INNOVATE – EXECUTE™ … the world will never be the same

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