Ewrt 30 class 4
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Ewrt 30 class 4

on

  • 553 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
553
Views on SlideShare
411
Embed Views
142

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0

1 Embed 142

http://palmoreewrt30.wordpress.com 142

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Ewrt 30 class 4 Ewrt 30 class 4 Presentation Transcript

  • EWRT30Class4
  • AGENDATerms 17-23Discussion: SonnetLecture: Form and Structure: Sestina/Villanelle:Guided Writing: Sestina/Villanelle
  • Terms 17-2317. Shakespearian or English Sonnet A fourteen-line poem in iambic pentameter. The Shakespearean or English sonnet is arranged as three quatrains and a final couplet, rhyming abab cdcd efef gg.18. The Petrarchan or Italian Sonnet A fourteen-line poem in iambic pentameter. It is divided into two parts: an eight-line octave and a six-line sestet, rhyming abba abba cde cde or abba abba cd cd cd (or other combination of cde). View slide
  • 19. Stanza A division or unit of a poem that is repeated in the same form--either with similar or identical patterns or rhyme and meter, or with variations from one stanza to another.20. Couplet A pair of rhymed lines that may or may not constitute a separate stanza in a poem. Shakespeares sonnets end in rhymed couplets, as in "For thy sweet love remembered such wealth brings / That then I scorn to change my state with kings."21. Quatrain A four-line stanza in a poem, the first four lines and the second four lines in a Petrarchan sonnet. A Shakespearean sonnet contains three quatrains followed by a couplet. View slide
  • 22.Octave An eight-line unit, which may constitute a stanza; or a section of a poem, as in the octave of a sonnet.22.Sestet A six-line unit of verse constituting a stanza or section of a poem; the last six lines of an Italian sonnet. Examples: Petrarchs "If it is not love, then what is it that I feel," and Frosts "Design."
  • The Review 5 minutes12. Rhyme 18. English Sonnet13. Feminine 19. Italian Sonnet Rhyme 20. Stanza14. Internal Rhyme 21. Couplet15. Slant Rhyme 22. Quatrain16. Eye Rhyme 23. Octave17. Identical 24. Sestet Rhyme
  • Discussion Subject: 10 minutesSonnets: Share your work. Identify bothsonnet and poetry conventions! Line number  Rhyme (of all Rhyme Scheme types) Structure  Metaphor/Simile  Quatrains  Alliteration  Couplets  Assonance  Octave/sestet  Onomatopoeia Meter/FeetA turn or volta
  • DylanThomas Lecture Subject The Villanelle
  • Villanelle Conventions 19 lines  5 stanzas of three lines; final stanza of four It has two rhyme sounds: A and B It has two repeating lines  The first repeating line appears as line 1 (A1) and repeats in lines 6, 12, and 18.  The second repeating line appears as line 3 (A2) and repeats in lines 9, 15, and 19.
  • PatternSt. 1A1 (first repeating line or refrain) b A2 (second repeating line or refrain)St. 2a b A1 (repeat of line 1)St. 3a b A2 (repeat of line 3)St. 4a b A1 (repeat of line 1)St. 5a b A2 (repeat of line 3)St. 6a b A1 (repeat of line 1) A2 (repeat of line 3)
  • St. 1A1 Do not go gentle into that good night, b A2 Rage, rage against the dying of the light.St. 2a b A1 Do not go gentle into that good night,St. 3a b A2 Rage, rage against the dying of the light. St. 4a b A1 Do not go gentle into that good night,St. 5a b A2 Rage, rage against the dying of the light.St. 6a b A1 Do not go gentle into that good night, A2 Rage, rage against the dying of the light.
  • St. 1A1 Do not go gentle into that good night, b Old age should burn and rave at close of day; A2 Rage, rage against the dying of the light.St. 2a Though wise men at their end know dark is right, b Because their words had forked no lightning they A1 Do not go gentle into that good night,St. 3a Good men, the last wave by, crying how bright b Their frail deeds might have danced in a green bay, A2 Rage, rage against the dying of the light. St. 4a Wild men who caught and sang the sun in flight, b And learn, too late, they grieved it on its way, A1 Do not go gentle into that good night,St. 5a Grave men, near death, who see with blinding sight b Blind eyes could blaze like meteors and be gay, A2 Rage, rage against the dying of the light.St. 6a And you, my father, there on the sad height, b Curse, bless, me now with your fierce tears, I pray. A1 Do not go gentle into that good night, A2 Rage, rage against the dying of the light.
  • St. 1A1 Do not go gentle into that good night, b Old age should burn and rave at close of day; A2 Rage, rage against the dying of the light.St. 2a Though wise men at their end know dark is right, b Because their words had forked no lightning they A1 Do not go gentle into that good night,St. 3a Good men, the last wave by, crying how bright b Their frail deeds might have danced in a green bay, A2 Rage, rage against the dying of the light. St. 4a Wild men who caught and sang the sun in flight, b And learn, too late, they grieved it on its way, A1 Do not go gentle into that good night,St. 5a Grave men, near death, who see with blinding sight b Blind eyes could blaze like meteors and be gay, A2 Rage, rage against the dying of the light.St. 6a And you, my father, there on the sad height, b Curse, bless, me now with your fierce tears, I pray. A1 Do not go gentle into that good night, A2 Rage, rage against the dying of the light.
  • Villanelles have no set rhythm or line length but the linesare usually even. Iambic pentameter (de-TROIT x 5) is acommon rhythm for serious villanelles. The Thomas poemis written in iambic pentameter (do NOT go GENtle INtoTHAT good NIGHT). The trochee rhythm (BOS-ton) alsoworks well.Eight to ten syllables per line is the most common lengthbut shorter or longer lines are okay too. The main goal isto keep the rhythm regular.For a light verse villanelle, anapest feet create a trippingrhythm ( te-te-TUM, ser-e-NADE). Or use dactyl feet for amarching or galloping effect (TUM-te-te, HAR-mo-ny).
  • Guided WritingVillanelle
  • 1. Choose a subject. W. H. Auden, when asked whether the form or content came first, replied, “At any given time, I have two things on my mind— a theme that interests me and a problem of verbal form. The theme looks for the right form; the form looks for the right theme. When the two come together, I am able to start writing.” Some subjects or themes that lend themselves well to the villanelles:  Duality, for example two differing points of view, or two unlike things or people forced together. Consider a poem about Christmas in a prison or care home. Note the duality: happy time, sad place.  Ironic subjects. Actor, writer and poetry aficionado Stephen Fry describes many villanelles as consisting of “a rueful, ironic reiteration of pain or fatalism.”  Humorous subjects—especially those rooted in irony.
  • Choose a subject! Add duality1. Good and bad aspects of an 13. Your favorite TV show or book early memory. 14. Your Hobbies2. Your first kiss (sweet but disastrous). 15. Celebrity news story3. The pain of betrayal by a good 16. Politics (the left? The right? An friend. event?)4. Your first pet (love and death).5. Your parents (bad or good). 17. School (Drama)6. Your siblings. 18. A death in the family.7. Your children. 19. A death of a friend.8. Your first love (what it might 20. The scariest moment of your life. have been).9. Your past love (broken heart) 21. The happiest moment of your life.10. Your current love. 22. A moment which made you angry.11. Lust.
  • 2. Write the two refrain lines. This most important step of the villanelle-writing process willlargely determine the success of your poem. When composing thetwo repeating lines keep the following in mind:  The end words of the two lines rhyme. The sound on which they end will also be the ‘a’ rhyme sound in the non-repeating lines. Therefore choose end words with a rhyme sound that’s easy to match.  The lines should resonate with a meaning that has the potential to enlarge as the poem progresses.  The lines should be musical and pleasing to the ear.  The two lines need to come together effectively at the end of the poem. Try beginning one or both refrain lines with a verb. “Technically the trick of it seems to be to find a refrain pair thatis capable of run-ons, ambiguity, and ironic reversal” says Fry.
  • 2. Write the two refrain lines (continued) Draft multiple (4 or 5) rhyming couplets that express your feeling or idea, or the heart of your concern. Pick the couplet that combines originality and expressiveness with some flexibility in the way those lines could be used in combination with others. “Technically the trick of it seems to be to find a refrain pair that is capable of run-ons, ambiguity, and ironic reversal” says Fry. Together, the two lines should form a sentence or phrase that will work to conclude your poem, but each must also stand on its own or be flexible enough to be used with other sentences or phrases.
  • 3. Write the villanelle form and enter the repeating linesSt. 1A1 (first repeating line or refrain) b A2 (second repeating line or refrain)St. 2a b A1 (repeat of line 1)St. 3a b A2 (repeat of line 3)St. 4a b A1 (repeat of line 1)St. 5a b A2 (repeat of line 3)St. 6a b A1 (repeat of line 1) A2 (repeat of line 3)
  • 4. Decide on your “b” rhyme sound. Again choose a sound that has lots of rhymepotential and that is different enough from rhyme‘a’ to provide a pleasing contrast. If you need some help finding rhymes, you canalways use a free on-line rhyming dictionary forsome help.  Rhymer  Rhymezone
  • Fill in your poem 5. Make lists of words that rhyme with the two sounds you have chosen, particularly choosing words that will work with your theme. A words B words 1 2 3 6. Compose the additional lines of your poem according to the rhyme scheme, using ideas suggested by the words on your list.
  • 7. Revise Make changes to enhance and add meaning, not simply for thesake of variety. “The repetition cannot be static,” says FrancesMayes. “Each time a repeating line appears it should have addedsignificance.” If this way of composing a poem seems contrived and non-poetic, be reassured that you’re not the first person to feel thisway. Despite the seemingly un-poetic method of composing,villanelles often appear spontaneous. Strive for such an effect,even if it takes much crossing out, agonizing over, and rewritinglines to get exactly what you’re after. Once you’re familiar with writing by-the-rules villanelles, youmay be tempted to join poets who have written villanelles thatbreak the rules. Some poets leave out or add stanzas, rhyme onlysome of the lines, or none at all, or even write in free verse. Forthis assignment, please try to conform to the rules.
  • Tips Use enjambment sometimes, so that your repeated lines are less obvious. Change the punctuation to alter meaning. Feel free to slightly modify the lines that you set up for your original couplet. Then, repeat this modification throughout the poem (if you are following the form of strict repetition), or use the modifications to reflect something (such as a progression of internal emotions).
  • Lecture Subject The SestinaElizabeth Bishop
  • Sestina ConventionsThe sestina makes no demands on the poet in terms of meter orrhyme or foot. Its requirements border on the mathematical and itsprescriptions are mainly syntactical.In Questions of Possibility: Contemporary Poetry and PoeticForm, David Caplan explains, The opening stanza introduces six endwords […] which repeat through the six sestets. Starting with the second sestet, each stanza duplicates the previous stanza’s endwords in the following order: last, first, fifth, second, fourth, then third. […] By the poem’s end, each end word appears in all six lines. Finally […] the concluding [stanza] features two endwords in each of its three lines, one as an endword and one in the middle of the line (18).
  • Sestina by Elizabeth Bishop 1 A 2 B 3 C 4 D 5 E 6 F 1 F 2 A 3 E 4 B 5 D 6 C 1 C 2 F 3 D 4 A 5 B 6 E
  • Classic Sestina Pattern Or another combination
  • Sestina: Final Stanza    FE BD CA  
  • Guided Writing
  • Choose a topic from great first novel lines Happy families are all alike; every unhappy family is unhappy in its own way. —Leo Tolstoy, Anna Karenina (1877; trans. Constance Garnett) I am an invisible man. —Ralph Ellison, Invisible Man (1952) The past is a foreign country; they do things differently there. —L. P. Hartley, The Go-Between (1953) This is the saddest story I have ever heard. —Ford Madox Ford, The Good Soldier (1915) All this happened, more or less. —Kurt Vonnegut, Slaughterhouse-Five (1969) Time is not a line but a dimension, like the dimensions of space. —Margaret Atwood, Cats Eye (1988) You better not never tell nobody but God. —Alice Walker, The Color Purple (1982) It was love at first sight. —Joseph Heller, Catch-22 (1961) Once upon a time, there was a woman who discovered she had turned into the wrong person. —Anne Tyler, Back When We Were Grownups (2001)
  • Sore Throat Choosing End WordsSestinaChoose at least some words that several different meanings: ex. "mean”Choose words that can be used as either nouns, verbs, or adjectives: ex. "swell”Choose one word that is so innocuous it can be put practically anywhere. Prepositions are good for this: ex. "down”Choose one polysyllabic word that is highly specific to your subject matter. (This will be the hardest one to rotate but it will contrast artistically with the others: ex. “Medicine”Choose a word that either rhymes or alliterates with one of your other words: ex. “well”Choose a power-word, which will likely end your poem: ex “die”
  • Choose concrete nouns toDemon include in your poemBugVirus These will be goodNeck descriptors in theThroat poemTonsilsMumpsScarlet FeverStrep ThroatHusbandInternetDoctor
  • Write the Ending First—Here is a list of the endwords:mean, swell, down, medicine, well and die.At this point, you don’t have to decide the order of the otherwords because you are going to write the end of your poem first.The trick to avoiding bad endings in a sestina is to write adevastatingly brilliant ending and then work toward it. You canalways rewrite it if it turns out not to fit your needs.Oh dont be mean! There must be medicineI can put down this throat to make me wellor it will swell and swell until I die.
  • Start at the beginning now! First StanzaThis morning I woke up as if a mean Ademon in the night had slithered down Bmy neck. My tonsils had begun to swell. CI moaned; I coughed; I drank some medicine Dnaively thinking I would soon feel well. ETen minutes on I still thought I might die. FNow your order has been determined!
  • Second Stanza"Oh come on silly. Youre not going to die," Fmy husband said. He wasnt being mean. AThe thing is, Im the one whos always well. EHe isnt used to seeing me go down Bwith nasty bugs or swallow medicine. D"Soon," he said, "Once more youll feel just swell." CNote: try and avoid end-stopping all the lines, another commonbeginners mistake. Note that the first line continues into the second.Also, line four flows into five.
  • Third StanzaBut my left tonsil continued to swell Call morning. I knew no-one ever died Fof a sore throat, and yet no medicine Dwas soothing it. What could this symptom mean? AI started feeling more and more cast down Band wondered if I would ever get well. ENote the use of "swell” as a verb in this stanza.Note that “die” changed to "died" in this stanza. All but the most puristof sestina-writers would agree that this is acceptable.
  • Fourth StanzaOnly one thing to do: consult the well Eof information on the Internet. That swelling Ccyberspace would help me pin this down B(or tell me just how long before I die). FI googled sore throat symptom, and the meaning Aof this popped out on medicine.com DThe author has used "swelling" for "swell" and"meaning" for "mean.” She has also really pushedthe boundaries by adding ".com" to "medicine.”
  • Stanzas five and sixIt could be Mumps! And theres no medicine Dto take for that. Just waiting to get well Ebut all the time in pain. What kind of mean, Asadistic virus is this? This is swell: Cit could be Strep Throat. I could even die Fof Scarlet Fever. Now Im feeling down. BSo in ten minutes I am going down Bto see the doctor. Maybe medicine Dwill stop me feeling like I want to die. FOh to be strong, and tonsil-less, and well! EOh for a pill to reduce this nasty swelling. COh for someone to tell me what this means. A
  • Now look back at the end stanza you wrote in the beginning:Oh dont be mean! There must be medicineI can put down this throat to make me wellor it will swell and swell until I die.Take a moment to revise:And if the mean Doc says no medicine ADhe can pour down this throat will make me well, BEbut time. Oh swell! All this pain and I cant die. CFThanks to Anna Evans, The Barefoot Muse, for help with writing a Sestina.