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Ewrt 30 class 16
Ewrt 30 class 16
Ewrt 30 class 16
Ewrt 30 class 16
Ewrt 30 class 16
Ewrt 30 class 16
Ewrt 30 class 16
Ewrt 30 class 16
Ewrt 30 class 16
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Ewrt 30 class 16

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Transcript

  • 1. EWRT 30 CLASS 15
  • 2. AGENDA  Terms 1-9  Writers' Workshop: Fiction Project #2
  • 3. 1. Drama 2. Playwright 3. Script 4. Act 5. Scene 6. Prologue 7. Antihero 8. Guerilla theater: 9. Subject TERMS 1-9
  • 4. 1. Drama: a literary art form that recreates human life and emotions (uses dialogue) 2. Playwright: the author of the drama. 3. Script: The play in written form. 4. Act: A division of a play. 5. Scene: A division of an act (change of location). 6. Prologue: an introduction 7. Antihero: a protagonist or central character who lacks the qualities typically associated with heroism— for example, bravery, morality, or good looks—but still manages to earn sympathy from the spectator.
  • 5. 8. Guerilla theater: a form of theater popularized in the United States during the 1960s that sought to confront spectators with brief, unscheduled, and often provocative performances in public spaces. Performers were interested in breaking traditional social barriers in order to convey their political messages. 9. Subject: What a story or play is about. To be distinguished from plot and theme. Faulkner's "A Rose for Emily" is about the decline of a particular way of life endemic to the American south before the civil war. Its plot concerns how Faulkner describes and organizes the actions of the story's characters. Its theme is the overall meaning Faulkner conveys.
  • 6. WRITERS’ WORKSHOP
  • 7. WRITER’S WORKSHOP #3 Get into your groups Pass out your fiction so that everyone in your group has a copy Take turns reading them aloud; Note obvious errors (typos, spelling) by marking on the text as the reader reads. Read everyone’s work before making comments about content, style, and conventions. Make sure each participant gets at least one thorough review of his or her work. Use the handout as a guide for your comments. Ask yourself the questions about each piece. Where should the writer focus his or her efforts in revision? Write on the story. Use the margins or the back for your comments. DO NOT write on the fiction revision workshop handout
  • 8. STEPS TO REVISION: AT HOME 1. Carefully and thoughtfully review the suggestions your readers have given you. 2. Make the changes that will improve your story. 3. Put aside the work for several hours or longer. This kind of literal space/time distance will allow you to gain some objectivity. 4. Revisit your story and the revision suggestions. 5. Make further changes. 6. Read your revised story aloud. 7. Revise again.
  • 9. HOMEWORK Post # 16: The best two or three paragraphs of your fiction project. Reading: Drama: 10 minute plays: "Gray Matter" Submit Project #3 before our next class meeting. Study: Terms

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