Ewrt 1 c class 33
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Ewrt 1 c class 33 Presentation Transcript

  • 1. EWRT 1C Class 31
  • 2. AGENDA • Writing about Literature • Basic Features • Analyzing your story • Annotating your story • Reviewing your thesis • Testing your thesis
  • 3. Discuss In Groups • Basic Features: Interpreting Stories • Analyzing your story • Annotating your story
  • 4. Basic Features 1. An Appropriately Presented Subject. 2. An Interesting and Clearly Stated Interpretation. 3. A Plausible Chain of Reasons with Convincing Support.
  • 5. Basic Features 1. An Appropriately Presented Subject. a. A directed Summary: Provides information about the story that the reader needs to understand your argument 2. An Interesting and Clearly Stated Interpretation. a. Interesting b. Arguable c. Clear d. Appropriately qualified 3. A Plausible Chain of Reasons with Convincing Support. a. Textual evidence: quote, summarize, and paraphrase from the story. b. Explain: the meaning of the passage and its relevance to the thesis. c. Combine evidence and explanation to support and develop your
  • 6. Analyzing Your story
  • 7. Analyzing Your story Psychoanalytic Criticism
  • 8. Analyzing Your story Feminist Criticism
  • 9. Analyzing Your story NEW Criticism How does this piece work?
  • 10. Annotating your story
  • 11. Ratinov’s Annotation
  • 12. Check your tentative thesis Make any necessary quick revisions to your thesis.
  • 13. Reviewing your thesis With a partner, or in groups of three, review each other’s thesis statements Writers: Take terns reading your tentative thesis statement aloud. Then take notes as your partners tell you what your thesis statement leads them to expect from your essay. Listeners: As the writer speaks, write down what you think are the key terms in the thesis statement. Remember that each of these key terms stands f or an idea or a link in the chain of reasons arguing for the overall thesis. Tell the writer what the ideas are that you expect will be developed in the essay. Also indicate if you think the writer will have difficulty supporting any of these ideas, if you do not see how the ideas work together. Point out ideas you think are obvious or uninteresting.
  • 14. Homework • Read Night • Draft an introduction to your essay by presenting a directed summary. Include your revised, tentative thesis. • Develop a plan for your draft by composing an informal scratch outline, a simple list of your reasons and support in the order you will introduce them. This is your tentative plan. You may revise as you make further discoveries about your text. • Post #24: Your introduction and thesis, followed by your tentative outline.