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1b week 9 class 1 (after movie week 8 class 2)
1b week 9 class 1 (after movie week 8 class 2)
1b week 9 class 1 (after movie week 8 class 2)
1b week 9 class 1 (after movie week 8 class 2)
1b week 9 class 1 (after movie week 8 class 2)
1b week 9 class 1 (after movie week 8 class 2)
1b week 9 class 1 (after movie week 8 class 2)
1b week 9 class 1 (after movie week 8 class 2)
1b week 9 class 1 (after movie week 8 class 2)
1b week 9 class 1 (after movie week 8 class 2)
1b week 9 class 1 (after movie week 8 class 2)
1b week 9 class 1 (after movie week 8 class 2)
1b week 9 class 1 (after movie week 8 class 2)
1b week 9 class 1 (after movie week 8 class 2)
1b week 9 class 1 (after movie week 8 class 2)
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1b week 9 class 1 (after movie week 8 class 2)

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  • 1. Extra Credit Opportunity: 10 points extra credit to those who stay for the whole presentation. Wednesday, March 14, 2012 6:00pm until 8:00pm at De Anza College Conference Room A or B This event is to raise awareness about Transgender identified persons and the problems they have to face everyday. It will be a part of a series of PRIDE events hosted by De Anza College through out the month of March, sponsored by ICS96, LGBT Studies, with Prof. Julie Lewis. Heres the Facebook event link http://www.facebook.com/#!/events/360943843930071/
  • 2. Daily Agenda Terms list 4: The final exam will be on the last day of the quarter, during finals week. It will include a comprehensive terms test, which will emphasize the new terms. The second part of the final will be an in- class essay exam—topics to be discussed later Lecture: Henry David Hwang Discussion: M. Butterfly: In-class Writing: Evaluating the Trickster Character
  • 3. Terms for Exam 4: A Comprehensive Test Gender Identity: The sense of “being” male or “being” female. For some people, gender identity is in accord with physical anatomy. For transgender people, gender identity may differ from physical anatomy or expected social roles. It is important to note that gender identity, biological sex, and sexual orientation are not necessarily linked. Heterosexism: The concept that heterosexuality is natural, normal, superior and required. A system of beliefs about the superiority of heterosexuals or heterosexuality evidenced in the exclusion, by omission or design, of gay, lesbian and bisexual persons in assumptions, communication, policies, procedures, events, or activities. Heterosexual: A person who is primarily and/or exclusively attracted to members of a gender or sex that is seen to be “opposite” or other than the one with which they identify or are identified. Homosexual: A person who is primarily and /or exclusively attracted to members of what they identify as their own sex or gender. Because the term possesses connotations of disease and abnormality, some people do not like to identify as homosexual. Still others do not feel that it accurately defines their chosen identity. Lesbian: One who identifies as a woman who is primarily or exclusively attracted to others who identify as women.
  • 4. • Sex Reassignment (SRS): A surgical procedure that modifies one’s primary and/or secondary sex characteristics. This process was formerly called a “sex change operation,” a phrase now considered offensive.
• Sexual Orientation: A person’s emotional, physical and sexual attraction and the expression of that attraction with other individuals. Some of the better-known labels or categories include “bisexual,” “multisexual,” “pansexual,” “omnisexual,” “lesbian,” “gay” (“homosexual” is a more clinical term), or “heterosexual.”
• Trans: Abbreviation for transgender, transsexual, or some other form of trans identity. “Trans” can invoke notions of transcending beyond, existing between, or crossing over borders.
• Transgender: An umbrella term used to describe people who do not fit into traditional gender categories, including transsexuals, transvestites or cross-dressers, intersexuals or hermaphrodites, and sometimes, even people who identify as butch or femme. Can invoke notions of transcending beyond, existing between or crossing over borders.
• Transition: The period when one is changing from living as one sex or gender to a different conception of sex or gender. Transitioning is complicated, multi-step process that may include surgically and/or hormonally altering one’s body.
  • 5. Henry David Hwang David Henry Hwang was born on August 11, 1957 in Los Angeles, California. His parents immigrated from China He went to Stanford University As an undergraduate, he wrote his first play FOB, which explores the contrast in attitudes between recently arrived Chinese immigrants and two Chinese-American students who have long since assimilated. He went to graduate school at Yale, where he continued to write successful plays.
  • 6. M Butterfly• Hwang returned to the stage with M. Butterfly, one of the most celebrated of recent American plays, and the first by an Asian- American to win universal acclaim.• It was first produced in 1988 and won numerous awards, including the Tony Award for Best Play of the Year, the New York Drama Desk Award, the Outer Critics Circle Award for Best Broadway play, and the John Gassner Award for the seasons outstanding new playwright.• M. Butterfly enjoyed a popular run on Broadway and when it moved to Londons Shaftsbury Theatre in 1989 it broke all box office records in the first week.
  • 7. Based on a true storyThe play is based on a bizarre but true story of aFrench diplomat who carried on a twenty-yearaffair with a Chinese actor and opera singer, notrealizing that his partner was in fact a manmasquerading as a woman. The diplomatapparently became aware of the deception onlyin 1986, when he was charged by the Frenchgovernment with treason—it transpired that hiscompanion had been an agent for the Chinesegovernment, and had passed on sensitivepolitical information that he had acquired fromthe diplomat.
  • 8. This almost unbelievable story stimulatedHwangs imagination, and from it he created adrama that plays with ideas on a grand scale andmanages at the same time to be witty andentertaining.Weaving into the play many parallels with, andultimately ironic reversals of, Puccinis opera,Madame Butterfly, Hwang explores thestereotypes that underlie and distort relationsbetween Eastern and Western culture, andbetween men and women.
  • 9. Madame Butterfly SummaryLieutenant B.F. Pinkerton is on shore-leave in Japan. He and his buddyLieutenant Barton, out for a night on the town, stop in at a local establishmentto check out the food, drink and girls, uh, and girls to quote Lt. Barton.Pinkerton spies Cho-Cho San and immediately falls in lust. Barton counselsPinkerton that he can marry this beautiful Japanese girl, enjoy himself withcultural approval, then sail happily on back to America unshackled, sinceabandonment equates divorce in Japan. Barton assures Pinkerton that onceabandoned, Cho-Cho will be free to marry whomever she chooses fromamongst the Japanese people. When Pinkertons ship sails out of port,Butterfly waits patiently for her husband to come home. Three years pass.Ever with her eye toward the harbor, Butterfly holds a secret delight that sheeagerly wishes to surprise her husband with: their son. Pinkerton arrives inJapan with his American bride by his side. He goes to Butterfly to make hisapologies and to finally end what Butterfly for three years has cherished in herheart.
  • 10. 1. Do you think it is possible for a man to love a woman for over twenty years without realizing that “she” is really a man? Think up a scenario where this is possible. Remember, the play is based on real events, no matter how far-fetched they may seem.
  • 11. Act I, Scenes 7-13
1. By Western standards, howdoes Song conform to the ideal stereotype ofthe Oriental woman? Give examples to back upyour assertions.2. In act 1, scene 11, the event where Gallimardloses his virginity is described. Is the setting“romantic”? How might this experience haveaffected (scarred) Gallimard? What points wasHwang trying to convey in including this scene?
  • 12. Act II, scenes 1-7
1. Compare and contrast Song with Renee, the other womanwith whom Gallimard has an affair. How are the two polaropposites of one another?2. How does Gallimard “face reality”? Discuss Gallimard’srefusal to see a doctor and the ease with which he can betalked out of seeing his mistress naked to back up your points.Do you think Gallimard is intentionally blind?
  • 13. Song as the Trickster? Does Song help us “better understand ourselves, and the perhaps subconscious aspects of ourselves that respond to the trickster’sunsettling and transformative behavior”? How? Consider these possible traits of a trickster (or others if you think they will better serve you). Physically, intellectually, or socially weak creature: The trickster is often portrayed as a much weaker character than his prey, and yet through cleverness and trickery, he is able to overcome all obstacles and prevail. In some cases the trickster may appear to be weaker physically in order to confuse his prey (false frailty). Shape Shifter: The trickster may change forms, sex, and so forth as an element of surprise to his victim. The change may also be psychological instead of (or in addition to) a visual change. Self-Serving: The trickster often feels that he or she has been wronged and is therefore justified in taking action to bring about change and/or to defeat “the enemy.”
  • 14. Homework Do research for essay #4.  Define the traditional “trickster”  Define the “trickster” of the 20th Century as you plan to use the word in reference to your thesis  Feel free to use the websites listed in the prompt  Find at least one source on your own Writing: Post your intro, thesis, and outline. Reading: Moraga "La Guera" and Far “Leaves from the Mental Portfolio of an Eurasian” Writing: Blog Prompt: Song as the Trickster? How does Song help us “better understand ourselves, and the perhaps subconscious aspects of ourselves that respond to the trickster’s unsettling and transformative behavior”? Use one or two of the traits of a trickster listed on prompt #4 to launch your discussion. Studying: Terms from list 4

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