Serial Killers SGP
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Serial Killers SGP

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Senior Graduation Project, Forensics and Psychology behind serial killers.

Senior Graduation Project, Forensics and Psychology behind serial killers.

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  • For my senior graduation project I researched the forensics and psychology behind serial killers.
  • Throughout my presentation I will talk about serial killers. During my powerpoint I am going to go over what a serial killer is, what causes a serial killer to turn into a serial killer, talk about the worlds most infamous serial killer, talk about fingerprinting processes, fingerprints, the eight main ways to identify a body and analyzing the crime scene to name a few things. I will then introduce my application, go over the details of it and get you started on my class activity which is to solve the murder I created.
  • At first I planned to do my project on criminal psychology. Basically criminal psychology is my head was being able to talk to serial killers while they’re in jail and things along those lines, but when I started my research I discovered that’s not the case. Early in my research of psychology I learned more about forensics because they go hand in hand when dealing with serial killers or any other criminal and I basically changed my focus to forensics but still kept my love of psychology in the project. From this I created the thesis that “Forensics and Psychology although very different, go hand in hand when it comes to investigations. One without the other does not allow a thorough investigation of serial killers.”
  • When people asked me what topic I was doing I usually got a face like “eww that’s twisted” and I understand why. Most people really are not interested in serial killers or murders or anything to do with them, but I have always been fascinated with criminals and murder, especially serial killers. Next year in college I am majoring in criminal justice and hopefully eventually working my way up to work in the homicide department of the Federal Bureau of Investigations Special Agent division. I figured this project would be interesting to me to research and give me a head start on what I will study through college and then work for when I grow up.
  • This topic as morbid as some people think it is, is important to every single one of you. Can you imagine a world where serial killers, or just criminals in general were just roaming around and there was nothing to stop them? Well without the use of forensics and psychology, this would be a reality and everyone would be in a lot of danger, a lot of the time. The only hopes of bringing a serial killer to justice would be death or just hoping they made a bad mistake and were caught in the act and then did something about it. Because of forensics and criminal psychology, you are relatively safe.
  • Are there certain events in a persons like that makes them a serial killer? Or is is a mind disease you cannot control? For ever, people have wondered those same questions, but “No one knows why some men and women become serial killers. Yet there are events that seem to be influential…”. Yes there are a lot of similarities in the lives of serial killers and events that have more than likely contributed to the twisted things they do, however they are not definitely what created who they are. A large percent of killers do suffer abuse and have uncomfortable sexual experiences as a child and are generally unable to make genuine healthy connections to other people. But there are many other people in America who have suffered from the same unfortunate events in life, but they can go through life without killing anyone, so the mystery of serial killers still remains a mystery.
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/antongurevich/3392386378/One of Americas more notorious Serial Killers was Ted Bundy. He is extremely interesting because he was different from the thought most people had coined in their head about serial killers. When you guys look at serial killers what do you think? Creepy perverts who are awkward looking? Well Ted Bundy was charming, pretty good looking, popular and good with the ladies. Yet, he had a desire to kill, and that is exactly what he did. People suspect Ted Bundy for the killings of over 100 women, but he had only confessed to 36 before he died.Bundy was born November 24, 1946 to a Louise Cowell. She was not ready to be a mother so she had her parents raise Bundy as if he was their own child and for the early years of his life, he believed his grandparents were his parents and that Louise was his sister. As He grew up Ted had a very difficult time making friends and making bonds with other children but excelled at school.
  • He committed his first murder while he was in college. Lynda Anne Healy was a student at the university of Washington and while she was sleeping in her house, Bundy slipped into her room, knocked her out while she was sleeping, rolled her in a blanket and took her away where he disposed of the body. After this incident happened more and more students in the area disappeared yet the killer was never discovered. However, people talked about witnessing “Friendly Ted”, which is what he called himself to others, with a “broken arm or leg”, which he faked, asking for help bringing all his things to his VW Bug.After a while, Bundy moved to the University of Utah to study and continue his bad habit. By the fall of ‘74, many more woman had disappeared, and although some bodies were found sodomized, sodomy is anal or oral sex, and mutilated, Bundy was never caught or questioned for any of the murders.
  • After college, Bundy moved into Colorado and then Idaho to lay low. However in Idaho he kidnapped, raped and drowned a teenage girl. He then back to Utah where he was in college, was assumed to kill more and thenwas later puller over for a driving infraction. The cop who pulled him over found things such as a crowbar, a ski mask, handcuffs and other suspicious items. He was arrested and then connected to an unsolved abduction in the area and was sentenced to 15 years in jail. A few months later he was found guilty for the death of Caryn Campbell and was brought to Colorado to be tried. While there, he escaped from a Colorado prison and headed to Tallahassee. There, he snuck into a sorority house and killed six girls. He clubbed four to death, and strangled two. He then went to rape and murder Kimberly Leach, who was a twelve year old girl in Lake City. She was his last victim because a little later on, he was stopped for a traffic violation while driving a stolen VW Bug and was arrested again. He was charged for Leach and the sorority girls separately and received the death penalty, twice. He spent the next eight years before his death filing appeals, just to have them all denied. Before his death by electric chair on January 24, 1989 he revealed the grisly details of his murders. He granted a television interview the night before his execution blaming violent porn as the trigger for his actions, not himself.
  • The scene of the crime and the crime scene are very different. But are not really ever given the opportunity to be different when it comes to how people see them.“The “scene of the crime” could be anything from a room to a receiver of a public phone booth” The scene of the crime is the place or thing where the crime literally happens. If a person is murdered in a room, that is the scene of the crime, whereas if it is a crime committed over the phone, the scene of the crime is the telephone itself.But the crime scene involves everywhere that was involved in this crime. It involves all the places where planning or stalking happened, the path the criminal took to get to the scene of the crime and then the path they took to get back to wherever they fled. The distinctions are kind of hard to remember but once you grasp the subject, are easy to remember and tell them apart.
  • Forensic investigations are not cheap. They require many people working, different processes such as fingerprinting, autopsy reports, and much more. Criminals surprisingly leave fingerprints behind a lot more than one would assume. Because of television shows and different forms of media you would think that all criminals would wear gloves or clean up to ensure that they could not be caught because of their fingerprints. But, many crimes are done in the heat of the moment, or are done carelessly, so we are luckily able to find them because if their fingerprint was there, so was the person to which it belongs.
  • The person who is involved in making sure the scene is kept in tact and properly examined is the first responder. The first responder is the first person to arrive at a crime scene. They have the job of analyzing what they see, keeping everything in order and keeping it safe for others to arrive. They need to help victims that need help, talking to any witnesses that have the memory fresh in their head, protect everyone from any danger that might still be there, preserve the evidence, and keep the scene safe for people who are coming in for backup. They need to be able to act on their instincts. They might have to make decisions such as what do I do first and if multiple things are in need of assistance, which do I do first? Every scene is different, so there is no set of rules they have to follow, they need to make immediate decisions based on what is in front of them.http://free-retro-graphics.com/fifties-clip-art/images/cop-crime-scene.jpg
  • A Crime scene analyst is just a civilian employed by the police department and not a cop like you would see on shows such as C.S.I. He or she has no more authority in the law than any other person on the street. If they were to need to make an arrest, they would have to do it like any other person and have a citizens arrest. TV shows such as law and order give a false view on what these people are allowed to do and what they do. TV shows make it look like that have so much authority, however they do not. Their job is just to analyze a scene and from there help in the investigation.Their job of a crime scene analyst is to respond to the crime scene and then perform tasks to document the scene such as taking pictures, collecting evidence and processing fingerprints. A Crime Scene Analyst performs all tasks needed to respond to the crime scene, from taking pictures to processing fingerprints. They need to be sure to thoroughly check every area of the crime scene, record and process every “clue” left behind and analyze them all to think higher of what could have happened and go out and bring the killer to justice.
  • “A profiler looks for patterns in crimes and tries to come up with the characteristics of the likely offender….We learn all we can from what has happened, use our experiences to fathom the probable reasons why it happened, and from these factors draw a portrait of the perpetrator of the crime.”A criminal profiler is not a real labeled job. They are employed as something else and then are giving the task from a higher boss to create the profile.Their job for the task is to take what they know about the killer and try to create an accurate sketch of them and determine traits of what they might do to possibly find them. Criminal profiling took traits from the Unabomber case and from this were able to create an accurate profile that looked exactly like him down to the double breasted jacket he wore.Profilers are able to determine a semi-accurate sketch and determine traits of a killer based on behavioral patters and they way they do things when creating the crime. A profiler is able to look at the crime scene and just from that possibly determine what they look like? This process is very intense and hard to understand. I still cannot grasp how they do it because it almost seems impossible but I found a list explaining how a person would do it.
  • First, the profiler would evaluate the criminal acts which just means looking at what happened, how the victim died. Second, is evaluating the crime scene. Looking at evidence around the area where the crime took place. Having something put out of place or the way anything was arranged can give you clues to the criminals behavioral patterns. Third, analyzing the victim. This again included how the victim was killed but this time instead of focusing more on what happened, you take a closer look at the victim. How they are bruised, how they look and look more into their past and see if there is anything that can help you. Fourth, evaluate the police records. This means taking a look at past criminal records and then looking at what was written up for this case. Looking at past unsolved cases and comparing them to the case you have in front of you can give you clues that are not there and possibly match it to another case to know if you possibly have a serial killer. Then, you take a look at the autopsy report. The report can go into more detail of what exactly happened to the victim. It gives you information such at the time of death, and how they were killed. Next, evaluate the offenders characteristics. Obviously, at this point you do not have the killer sitting in front of you, but instead you have to take the information you have gathered so far, and instead kind of guess on the characteristics. From there the profiler suggests where to go from there, and what could bring the best results.
  • Forensics is the use of science to analyze a crime scene and the hard facts or evidence found during an investigation. This involves studying the scene, looking for evidence and analyzing the evidence in a lab. Forensics is a very in-depth process and involves every scientific and analytical procedure in a case.
  • Forensics generally revolves around a laboratory comparing DNA, and analyzing evidence but, there is more than just that. The place where the crime takes place, the scene of the crime, is just as important as analyzing what you discover. If a scene is not properly examined, many important things can be overlooked and the work in the lab could be useless.
  • DNA profiling is when the killer could leave his DNA behind through fingerprints, blood or hair. DNA profiling could also be used to identify a victim. DNA profiling does not always work because if the person is not a past offender, there would be no DNA record of them in the police records. However, many Killers are past criminal offenders of some type, and it is helpful to at least check.There are limits to DNA Profiling thought because “Even if a forensic anthropologist gets a DNA Profile from a victim, identification cannot be made until the profile is matched to a missing person.”Criminal DNA is kept in a computerized database, but there is no database for the general population so To identify a person, generally one has to turn to missing person files but this process can take days or weeksOften, there is no match because the victim was homeless, a loner, or a prostitute who no one reported missing and the case goes unsolved.
  • not all autopsies are forensic. Determining cause of death many be strictly medical procedure, designed only to answer questions of medical curiosity and not to gather evidence for future legal proceedings. However, violent deaths, suspicious deaths in apparently healthy individuals, and some accidental deaths, fall firmly into the forensic field. An Autopsy is a medical procedure which can determine different things about a persons death to help with an investigation.Performing an autopsy can determine the identity of the victim. Fingerprints, dental records, and physical appearance can help one to I.D. a person if they are labeled a “John or Jane Doe”. The cause of the death. They check for poisons, fatal wounds or other causes for death. The manner and mechanism or mode of death. Such as strangulation by scarf or belt. Or what was used in a beating, the type of poison used or any other variation of a mode of death. And lastly the time of death. Stages of how far along a body has gone through Post-mortem can tell a autopsy practitioner how long ago a person passed away.
  • Joints and soft tissue are important because if a person has had an organ transplant they have a serial number inside of them them is recorded in a hospital database somewhere. Every transplanted organ has a number, and identifying the person in front of you is as easy as typing in a few numbers.http://www.forensiccrimescene.com/8-body-parts-forensic-scientists-use-to-id-a-body/#more-704
  • Your teeth are recorded through your dental records, certain traits about your teeth, or fillings can be matched to dental records on file. They can also compile a picture of what the smile would look like to compare to a photograph of a suspected victim.http://www.forensiccrimescene.com/8-body-parts-forensic-scientists-use-to-id-a-body/#more-704
  • Certain defining birthmarks and scars on a victims body are helpful because if you need to identify a person, if they have a certain mark such as a huge scar on their left cheek, it rules out a lot of possible people.http://www.forensiccrimescene.com/8-body-parts-forensic-scientists-use-to-id-a-body/#more-704
  • Hair contains your DNA and can be matched to other DNA samples a person might have of the same person. Many people are not dying, and treating their hair with different products which in some way change your hair, but it is still comes up with decent results.http://www.forensiccrimescene.com/8-body-parts-forensic-scientists-use-to-id-a-body/#more-704
  • Bones can help determine a persons age, sex, race, weight and how they died. Certain marks, and the way it is formed can give you an almost full story of the person it once belonged to.http://www.forensiccrimescene.com/8-body-parts-forensic-scientists-use-to-id-a-body/#more-704
  • Your toenails, like hair, contain your DNA which can be used to identify a body.http://www.forensiccrimescene.com/8-body-parts-forensic-scientists-use-to-id-a-body/#more-704
  • Like bone, a skull can be used to determine sex and race, but it also allows you to determine facial features. This is helpful because instead of just having a general profile of the victim you can see specific details about certain features.http://www.forensiccrimescene.com/8-body-parts-forensic-scientists-use-to-id-a-body/#more-704
  • Fingerprints are an easy way to identify a body because no two fingerprints are the same.http://www.forensiccrimescene.com/8-body-parts-forensic-scientists-use-to-id-a-body/#more-704
  • Fingerprints area very helpful tool to identify a person. Not one fingerprint is exactly the same as another. Because of this, if you have someone fingerprint, you hold their identity. The different types of fingerprints are arch, tented arch, unlar loop, radial loop, whorl, double-loop whorl, central pocket loop whorl, and accidental whorl. The tree main types of fingerprints are loop, whorl, and arch. With a loop pattern the ridges in the fingerprints flow in one side,loop  around, touch the imaginary line from the delta to the core, and then loop around again. 70% of people have this fingerprint pattern. Whorl Patterns generally have a set of circles set around the same center. 25% of the population have whorl pattern. The last type is an arch pattern. In this pattern the ridges in your fingers flow from one side to the other. Only 5% of the population have this type of pattern.A Delta is the point on a on the triangular area where the ridges radiate outward in three directions. (Show the picture where the delta is shown.)http://www.crimescene-forensics.com/Fingerprints.html
  • Fingerprinting is a very important and delicate process. One needs to be careful not to touch the bristles of the brush because the powder will adhere to the oils on the brush as readily as to oils in the prints, a clumpy mess. In order to fluff the brush you should shake it gently to loosen the bristles.Excess pressure or strokes across the line of the print can cut it, creating streaks. The streaks will mess with the fingerprint pattern, essentially ruining it. So you need to be sure that you use a light touch on the first stroke you make. After the first stroke, pause to check which way the print is heading and then continue stroking in that direction until you have the full fingerprint visible. Genge, Ngaire E. The forensic casebook : the science of crime sceneinvestigation. New York: Ballantine Books, 2002. Print. Tilstone, William J, Kathleen A Savage, and Leigh A Clark, eds. Forensic      Science. Santa Barbara: ABC-CLIO, 2006. Print.
  • Once you have the fingerprint in view, blow off the extra powder so you just have the powder outlining the print. if the scene requires people to be masked inside the tape, a can of compressed air can be helpful. ThenApply print tape to the entire print, starting at the top of the print and moving steadily. You need complete contact, no wrinkles or “fish eyes” or (bubbles). With tape in place, firmly press straight down on the entire surface. Don’t rub it about, just press down. (like the art of dropping a cover on a microscope slide without trapping bubbles beneath, taping skills improve with practice). Genge, Ngaire E. The forensic casebook : the science of crime sceneinvestigation. New York: Ballantine Books, 2002. Print. Tilstone, William J, Kathleen A Savage, and Leigh A Clark, eds. Forensic      Science. Santa Barbara: ABC-CLIO, 2006. Print.
  • Just as placement requires a steady hand, removing tape from the surface without wrinkles or creases requires a smooth lift without pauses. You need to be careful when gathering fingerprints because if you do not keep a steady hand, when you remove the tape with the fingerprint on it, you could wrinkle or or crease the tape which will ruin the fingerprint you just got. In order to ensure than that print is lifted without a problem, you need to lift it swiftly yet smoothly. Then you Carefully lay the tape on the card and ensure there are no loose corners. You place the tape with the imprint of the fingerprint onto a card (like an index card) to make it easier to move and store.Genge, Ngaire E. The forensic casebook : the science of crime sceneinvestigation. New York: Ballantine Books, 2002. Print. Tilstone, William J, Kathleen A Savage, and Leigh A Clark, eds. Forensic      Science. Santa Barbara: ABC-CLIO, 2006. Print.
  • After you are finished collecting the fingerprint, you must document the collection. Immediately initial and neatly jot notes onto the card and in the examiners notebook, making sure to have each lift numbered and mapped to the larger scene maps and diagrams. This makes it easier to keep everything organized for future use and reference. If at some point you feel the lift you just did is not as good as it could be, you may repeat the process for a second lift.Genge, Ngaire E. The forensic casebook : the science of crime sceneinvestigation. New York: Ballantine Books, 2002. Print. Tilstone, William J, Kathleen A Savage, and Leigh A Clark, eds. Forensic      Science. Santa Barbara: ABC-CLIO, 2006. Print.
  • “this had been a nightmare crime scene – no nonresident prints anywhere. Then, there it was – this beautiful complete thumb on a piece of chocolate in a Christmas candy box! It’s funny how we think sometimes. The suspect touched nothing else, but was caught because he didn’t like nuts. God bless chocoholics.” This story is amazing to think about because the killer cleaned the crime scene once he was done, he was obviously smart and knew what he was doing however he must have had a crazy craving for chocolate because he went to their box of candy and took a piece. Once he picked it up he realized there were nuts in it, and like most who don’t like nuts he put it back not thinking anything of it, because who would think you could be convicted of a crime because of a piece of chocolate? Apparently he didn’t because he just left it there, a perfect thumbprint proving he was there.Genge, Ngaire E. The forensic casebook : the science of crime sceneinvestigation. New York: Ballantine Books, 2002. Print.
  • Genge, Ngaire E. The forensic casebook : the science of crime sceneinvestigation. New York: Ballantine Books, 2002. Print. "Pilot." Dexter. CBS / Showtime. 1 Oct. 2006. Television. Clyde Phillips Production
  • the physical presence of blood droplets,their shape,number, as well as the patterns they made when they fell or were sprayed against the walls, floor, or ceiling – tells a story. Just by examining the blood splatter patterns of a crime scene you are able to tell the angle from where the blood left the body, the speed of the blood spray, the area of the wound, and the type of weapon used. You can figure out so much information about a murder just by examining a blood droplet on the ground.Genge, Ngaire E. The forensic casebook : the science of crime scene      investigation. New York: Ballantine Books, 2002. Print.
  • You can determine the velocity of the blood splatter by the size of the drops. The smaller the drops, the faster they were moving. The larger the drops, the slower they were moving. When there is a fog of small droplets you can be almost sure that the injury was caused by a gunshot or an explosive device. When the blood splatter is medium sized (not a fog and not huge), they are almost always related to a knife or blunt object wound. When the droplets are slightly bigger, the wound is from a severe hand beating. Larger drops are created by slower and low impact wounds such as a punch. Genge, Ngaire E. The forensic casebook : the science of crime scene      investigation. New York: Ballantine Books, 2002. Print.
  • The pattern of the blood splatter can also show you the height that the blood dropped from. If a drop of blood hits a smooth surface from directly overhead, it forms a round spot. Because of this, when the shape is not a round spot you can determine different factors of the wound. When the blood splatter forms a crown, it dropped from a greater height. For example, the head instead of a leg, or on top of a few stairs compared to sitting on a chair. A crown in a round drop that hit the ground, bounces up, and then falls back down creating smaller droplets around the original drop creating a “crown”.POOLGenge, Ngaire E. The forensic casebook : the science of crime scene      investigation. New York: Ballantine Books, 2002. Print.
  • “if a blood drop hits at an angle, the edge that hits first-the leading edge-will be round because the droplet was still round at that point. The far side of the now-deformed droplet, however will be irregular. Looking at the drop, the investigator now knows the direction in which the drop of blood was traveling-toward the jagged edge of the spot” The angle at which the blood hits the ground it very important because it can tell you information such as how the killer was holding a gun, the position of it, and even the height of the killer. From before, we know that when a blood droplet falls normal, from straight above, it is round. But, when it is splattered from an angle, on side will be rounded and the other will be irregular. You can tell the direction of the drop by seeing which way the jagged / irregular side is pointing. The irregular side will be pointing away from the exit area.Genge, Ngaire E. The forensic casebook : the science of crime scene      investigation. New York: Ballantine Books, 2002. Print.
  • This Is the equation investigators use to determine the angle at which the droplets fell. The angle of impact is equal to the arc sin of the drops width divided by its length.Genge, Ngaire E. The forensic casebook : the science of crime scene      investigation. New York: Ballantine Books, 2002. Print.
  • http://www.crimescene.com/index.htmlhttp://www.essortment.com/all/forensicmurder_rxow.htmGenge, Ngaire E. The forensic casebook : the science of crime scene      investigation. New York: Ballantine Books, 2002. Print.
  • For my application, I staged a murder and investigation. At my house

Serial Killers SGP Serial Killers SGP Presentation Transcript

  • Serial Killers
    Jordan Eustace
    Senior Graduation Project
    May 12, 2010
    Mrs. Oren, Period 10
  • Overview
    Powerpoint presentation
    Application imovie
    Application overview
    Class activity
  • Forensics and Psychology although very different, go hand in hand when it comes to investigations. One without the other does not allow a thorough investigation of serial killers.
    T
    H
    E
    S
    I
    S
  • Personal Importance
    Special Agent
  • Why should you care?
  • “Tracking Serial Killers”
    “No one knows why some men and women become serial killers. Yet there are events that seem to be influential…” (Yancey 8)
  • “Sometimes
    I
    Feel
    Like
    A
    vampire”
  • "You feel the last bit of breath leaving their body. You're looking into their eyes. A person in that situation is God!"
  • “The “scene of the crime” might be a room, an entire building, a wharf, and surrounding harbor, the three mile path of a disintegrating airplane, or just the keypad and receiver of a public phone booth”
    “A “crime scene” isn’t only the actual location of the crime – it is also the staging and planning areas, the paths of flight to and from the primary scene, and the paths between the primary and secondary scenes.”
  • “The Forensic Casebook”
  • “The profiler looks for patterns in crimes and tries to come up with the characteristics of the likely offender….We learn all we can from what has happened, use our experiences to fathom the probable reasons why it happened, and from these factors draw a portrait of the perpetrator of the crime” (Ressler, Shachtman 32)
  • “Tracking a Serial Killer”
    Creating a Criminal Profile
    Evaluate the criminal act(s)
    Evaluate the crime scene(s)
    Analyze the victim(s)
    Evaluate preliminary police records
    Evaluate autopsy report
    Profile the offender’s characteristics
    Suggest future investigation
  • what is
    f r n i s
    o e s c
  • “Perhaps it may seem as though forensics always revolves around the laboratory, in which case it does, but one should not underestimate the importance of what takes place at the crime scene itself, for without before there is no after, just as there wouldn't be much use for forensic science if incorrect crime scene procedures led to the discredit of forensic evidence in court.”
  • “Tracking Serial Killers”
    DNA Profiling
    “Even if a forensic anthropologist gets a DNA Profile from a victim, identification cannot be made until the profile is matched to a missing person.”
  • “not all autopsies are forensic. Determining cause of death many be strictly medical procedure, designed only to answer questions of medical curiosity and not to gather evidence for future legal proceedings. However, violent deaths, suspicious deaths in apparently healthy individuals, and some accidental deaths, fall firmly into the forensic field” (N.E. Genge 171 – 172)
  • eight
    • Joints and soft tissue
    • Joints and soft tissue
    • Dental records
    • Joints and soft tissue
    • Dental records
    • Skin
    • Joints and soft tissue
    • Dental records
    • Skin
    • Hair
    • Joints and soft tissue
    • Dental records
    • Skin
    • Hair
    • Bone
    • Joints and soft tissue
    • Dental records
    • Skin
    • Hair
    • Bone
    • Feet
    • Joints and soft tissue
    • Dental records
    • Skin
    • Hair
    • Bone
    • Feet
    • Skull
    • Joints and soft tissue
    • Dental records
    • Skin
    • Hair
    • Bone
    • Feet
    • Skull
    • Fingerprints
  • Fingerprints
    whorl
    arch
    loop
  • Finger printing process
    fluff the brush
    Light stroke over area
    see which direction it is going, and continue
  • Finger printing process cont..
    Blow off extra powder.
    photograph the print
    “Apply print tape to the entire print, starting at the top of the print and moving steadily. You need complete contact, no wrinkles or “fish eyes” (bubbles). With tape in place, firmly press straight down on the entire surface. Don’t rub it about, just press down. (like the art of dropping a cover on a microscope slide without trapping bubbles beneath, taping skills improve with practice)” (N.E. Genge 39)
  • Finger printing process cont...
    “Just as placement requires a steady hand, removing tape from the surface without wrinkles or creases requires a smooth lift without pauses.
    Carefully lay the tape on the card and ensure there are no loose corners.”
    (N.E. Genge 39)
  • Fingerprinting process cont….
    Document the collection. Immediately initial and neatly jot notes on the card and in the examiners notebook, making sure to have each lift numbered and mapped to the larger scene maps and diagrams.
    Repeat if it appears a second lift might be better than the first.
    • “this had been a nightmare crime scene – no nonresident prints anywhere. Then, there it was – this beautiful complete thumb on a piece of chocolate in a Christmas candy box! It’s funny how we think sometimes. The suspect touched nothing else, but was caught because he didn’t like nuts. God bless chocoholics.” (N.E. Genge 30)
  • Blood splatter patterns
  • Blood splatter patterns
    “the physical presence of blood droplets-their shape and number, as well as the patterns made when they fell or were sprayed against the walls, floor, or ceiling – tells a story” (N.E. Genge 98)
  • Blood splatter…
    Shows you the velocity of the drop as it fell
    The smaller the droplets, the faster the injury
    fog of tiny droplets = explosively fast
    Medium = mid-speed / blunt objects
    Large = slow / punch
  • Blood splatter
    “When a drop of blood hits a smooth surface from directly overhead, it tends to form a round spot”
    “drops from a greater height can form a “crown” – a round drop that hits, bounces up, then falls again to cause small droplets around the original drop.” (N.E. Genge 99)
  • Blood splatter
    “if a blood drop hits at an angle, the edge that hits first-the leading edge-will be round because the droplet was still round at that point. The far side of the now-deformed droplet, however will be irregular. Looking at the drop, the investigator now knows the direction in which the drop of blood was traveling-toward the jagged edge of the spot” (N.E. Genge 99)
  • Angle = arc sin (width/length).
  • Works Cited / Consulted
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    Yancey, Diane. Tracking A Serial Killer. Farmington Hills: Thomson Gale, 2007.      Print.
    Zonderman, Jon. Beyond The Crime Lab. New York: Courier Companies, Inc., 1990.      Print.
  • Application
  • Class Activity
  • conclusion