BOSNA I HERCEGOVINA
Ministarstvo civilnih poslova
Ministry of Civil Affairs

Strasbourg, 8 November 2010

DGIV/EDU/CIT (20...
Participants
37 participants from SEE countries – Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, ‘the
Former Yugoslav...
East Europe (SEE) Networking Conference on Education for Democratic Citizenship and
Human Rights. She started her welcomin...
•

• task-based activities,

•
•

• team work,

•
•

• interactive [participative] methods involving students in the diffe...
Mr Peter Krapf from Germany presented the manual Volume IV “Taking part in
democracy”. By way of introduction he pointed o...
was further discussed in line with two separate dimensions, i.e. [i] the process of
dissemination (considering the transla...
the curriculum in compulsory education and the teacher training process. Ms Snežana
Vuković and Ms Radmila Radić Dudić pre...
APPENDIX I
LIST OF PARTICIPANTS
ALBANIA
Mr Astrit DAUTAJ
Education Specialist
Institute for development of Education
Rr. “...
MONTENEGRO
Ms Bojka DJUKANOVIC
Professor
Faculty of Philosophy, University of Montenegro
Danila Bojovica bb
81400 NIKSIC
M...
Ruger Boskovik bb
1000 SKOPJE
Ms Ivanka MIJIKJ
Advisor for International Collaboration and Research Projects
Bureau for De...
ICRC
Ms Maja ANDRIC, EHL Regional Adviser for Central and South-Eastern Europe
International Committee of the Red Cross
So...
Mr Peter KRAPF
Teacher Training College Weingarten
St. Longinus-Strasse 3
88250 WEINGARTEN, Germany
Ms Sabrina MARRUNCHEDD...
APPENDIX II

Eighth Regional EDC/HRE Networking Conference
for South East Europe (SEE)
21-22 October 2010
Sarajevo, Bosnia...
5

Professionally, the Conference was useful for me

Strongly disagree

Disagree

Neutral

Agree

Strongly agree

5

12

C...
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Report sarajevo en

  1. 1. BOSNA I HERCEGOVINA Ministarstvo civilnih poslova Ministry of Civil Affairs Strasbourg, 8 November 2010 DGIV/EDU/CIT (2010) 16 8th South East Europe (SEE) Networking Conference on Education for Democratic Citizenship and Human Rights Putting into practice the Council of Europe Charter on Education for Democratic Citizenship and Human Rights Education1: Practical tools for teachers 21-22 October 2010 Hotel Bosnia Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina Meeting organised by the Ministry of Civil Affairs, Council of Europe, Swiss State Secretariat for Education and Research (SBF) and IPE- International Projects in Education (part of PH Zurich University) Report Prepared by Mitja SARDOČ 1 Council of Europe Charter on Education for Democratic Citizenship and Human Rights Education was adopted in the framework of Recommendation CM/Rec(2010)7 of the Committee of Ministers.
  2. 2. Participants 37 participants from SEE countries – Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, ‘the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia’, Montenegro, Romania, Serbia, Slovenia, Turkey – as well as representatives of major European and international partners and stakeholders met in Sarajevo at the kind invitation of the Ministry of Civil Affairs, Council of Europe, Swiss State Secretariat for Education and Research (SBF) and IPE- International Projects in Education (part of PH Zurich University) THURSDAY, 21 OCTOBER 2010 Opening of the meeting The opening of the 8th South East Europe (SEE) Networking Conference on Education for Democratic Citizenship and Human Rights was moderated by Mr Suad Alić. He greeted the participants and welcomed them in Sarajevo as well as thanked the representatives of the institutions who enabled the organisation of the meeting. He also welcomed the guests at this meeting including representatives of Civitas, OSCE and the International Committee of the Red Cross. Ms Esma Hadzagić, Assistant Minister, Ministry of Civil Affairs, BiH warmly welcomed the participants and wishes them good results of this two days’ meeting. In particular, she emphasised the importance of how to teach Education for Democratic Citizenship and Human Rights Education (EDC/HRE) and the crucial role of good practices in this area. At the same time, she commented on some disturbing messages coming from Europe that multiculturalism as a concept and a policy does not work. She stressed the importance of human rights education as a key tool in building a respectful multicultural society. As she emphasised, educational institutions are at the very center of the promotion of human rights and democracy. She invited the participants of this meeting to experience multiculturalism on site as people living in Sarajevo have done for centuries. She also congratulated the teachers who participated in the process of developing the materials presented at this meeting. In the concluding part of her welcoming address, she expressed the gratitude to the Council of Europe and the Swiss embassy for helping to organise this meeting. Mr Thomas Rüegg, Head of the Swiss Co-operation Office, BiH greeted the participants of the meeting on behalf of the Swiss government and the Swiss embassy in BiH. He pointed out that the educational environment should take diversity as both enriching and valuable for all participants who take part in the educational process. He emphasised that the topic of the conference, i.e. learning about democracy in schools, should be extended to include also issues on toleration, respect and solidarity. At the same time, he stressed the key role in bringing democracy to schools for children, teachers as well as for families, neighbourhoods, communities, municipalities and for the society as a whole. The process of learning EDC/HRE should bring along the knowledge about human security and social inclusion. He pointed out that democracy should not be understood exclusively as instrumental in mediating the tensions between majority and the minorities but as a process to make rights work In particular, he emphasized the role of the education process in the development of socioeconomic standars, human security, stability and social inclusion. Ms Sarah Keating-Chetwynd, Head of the Unit for regional co-operation & joint EU/CoE education programmes in Southeast Europe at the Council of Europe welcomed warmly the participants on behalf of the Council of Europe. She thanked the Ministry of Civil Affairs, BiH and the Swiss authorities for their financial and moral support in organizing the 8th South 2
  3. 3. East Europe (SEE) Networking Conference on Education for Democratic Citizenship and Human Rights. She started her welcoming address in drawing the attention to the work of the SEE network since 2006, the role of different stakeholders including the official authorities, civil initiatives, NGOs etc as well as the work of other CoEs networks including the network of EDC/HRE coordinators and the Baltic/Black Sea network. She pointed out that this meeting is of crucial importance for the launching of 6 manuals and the dissemination and future implementation of the Council of Europe Charter on Education for Democratic Citizenship and Human Rights Education adopted by the Committee of Ministers in May 2010. She stressed two separate points that need to be distinguished: [i] the context of the adoption Charter (within the context of a package of reforms of the Eurpean Court of Human Rights – and thus education seen as a preventative mechanism); and [ii] the the content of the Charter. The Charter, as she pointed out, is the codification of 14 years of cooperation. She also stressed the importance of education for the creation of the culture of human rights. Finally, she emphaised the complete ‘package’ offered by the CoE, including the Charter, the EDC/HRE pack and the 6 manuals and invited the participants to make use of these instruments in practice. Plenary: Presentation of the Charter and materials to support its implementation This session was focused on the presentation of the Council of Europe Charter on Education for Democratic Citizenship and Human Rights Education and the materials to support its implementation. The sesion was chaired by Ms Nevenka Lončarić Jelačić who pointed out the importance of the Charter for the implementation of EDC/HRE in the Council of Europe member states. In the first part, Ms Bojka Djukanović presented the Council of Europe Charter on Education for Democratic Citizenship and Human Rights Education. She drew the attention of participants to the context of adoption of the Charter in the framework of Recommendation CM/Rec(2010)7 of the Committee of Ministers by all 47 member states of the Council of Europe in May 2010 and the achievements of the EDC project in its previous phases between 1997 and 2010. This was followed by the presentation of the Charter and its structure. Her presentation was followed by a remark on how to make the best out of the Charter and its implementation. The second part of this session was devoted to the presentation of the EDC/HRE Manuals. Three volumes were presented: Volume II “Growing up in democracy”2 was presented by Ms Wiltrud Weidinger; Volume III “Living in democracy”3 was presented by Mr Rolf Gollob; and Volume IV “Taking part in democracy”4 was presented by Mr Peter Krapf. Ms Wiltrud Weidinger from the Zurich University of Teacher Education presented the manual Volume II “Growing up in democracy”. She emphasized the same set-up of the three volumes presented as well as follow the same structure. At the same time, all three volumes consist of the same conceptual framework and principles that lead teachers and experts on EDC/HRE, i.e. the • active learning of students, • 2 3 4 Volume II: Growing up in democracy: lesson plans for primary level on democratic citizenship and human rights (2010) Volume III: Living in democracy: lesson plans for lower secondary level on democratic citizenship and human rights. (2008) Volume IV: Taking part in democracy: lesson plans for upper secondary level on democratic citizenship and human rights. (2010) 3
  4. 4. • • task-based activities, • • • team work, • • • interactive [participative] methods involving students in the different activities, • critical thinking as a main aspect of the three volumes to form and make students aware of the different possibilities [to express their opinions]; • • • • and participation. Together with the other two volumes (Volume III “Living in democracy” and Volume IV “Taking part in democracy”) they share the same conceptual framework, i.e. • emphasises learning by doing; • • • is structures around teaching tasks; • • • employs group work and co-operative learning; • • • uses discussion and debate; • • • encourages students to think for themselves; and • • • allows student to contribute to the training process. She then presented the setup of the manuals: the volume consits of 9 units each with four lessons each corresponding with key concepts [using the model of the spiral curriculum]. The units include the following topics: government and politics; identity; rules and law; media, rights and freedom; conflict; diversity and pluralism; responsibiility and equality. They form the spiral curriculum at a different level of encountering a particular key concept. At the same time, three separate dimensions of competences have been emphasised in the manuals, i.e.: [i] competence in political analysis and judgement [competence 1]; [ii] competence in the use of methods [competence 2]; and [iii] political decision-making and action [competence 3]. She then presented the composition of the 9 separate units each dealing with a specific key concept: • • Unit 1: Me in my community [key concept: identity]; Unit 2: At home in Europe [key concept: diversity and pluralism]; • • Unit 3: Minorities and majorities [key concept: equality]; • • Unit 4: Rules help to solve conflits [key concept: conflict]; • • Unit 5: The basis of living together [key concept: rules and law]; • • Unit 6: I am the boss! Am I? [key concept: power and authority]; • • Unit 7: I go eco … my school takes part! [key concept: responsibility]; • • Unit 8: My rights – your rights [key concept: rights and freedom]; • • Unit 9: Media in use [key concept: the media]. Mr Rolf Gollob from the Zurich University of Teacher Education presented the manual Volume III “Living in democracy” and the different contexts where the manuals have been tested and used. At the same time, he focused in his presentation on how to bring together the Charter with teaching materials. As he pointed out, it should be further implemented to reach the target groups of schools, teachers and students. At the end of his presentation, he raised the crucial importance of translating and implementing these teaching manuals in different EDC/HRE educational contexts of the Council of Europe’s member states. 4
  5. 5. Mr Peter Krapf from Germany presented the manual Volume IV “Taking part in democracy”. By way of introduction he pointed out that these three teaching manuals form a spiral curriculum. In his presentation he focused on the 9 teaching units and the specific competences each of the tasks is to develop. Unit 1 Key concept Identity Key task: the students … … reflect important choices in life; 2 Responsibility … handle dilemma situations; 3 Diversity and pluralism … discuss what values a pluralist society should share; 4 Conflict … negotiate how to solve a conflict; 5 Rules and law … design and institutional framework; 6 Government and politics … explore their opportunities to participate in decision-making; 7 Liberty … exercise their right of free and expression in a debate; 8 Equality … decide how to balance the interetss of majority and minority groups; 9 Media … produce a wall newspaper. Workshops: The implementation of the Charter and the use of CoE materials (EDC/HRE Pack and manuals) The participants of the meeting were then divided into 5 separate working groups where they had to discuss two questions, i.e. [i] What happens in countries members states in the area of EDC/HRE; and [ii] How to implement the Council of Europe Charter on Education for Democratic Citizenship and Human Rights Education and use the manuals presented? Q1: What happens in countries members states in the area of EDC/HRE? The participants of the working groups raised different contextual issues that are associated with the implementatio of EDC/HRE policies in Council of Europe member states including the school curriculum, teacher training [university training and in-service teacher training], translation, publication and dissemination of materials. Q2: How to implement the Council of Europe Charter on Education for Democratic Citizenship and Human Rights Education and use the manuals presented? This question raised a set of separate challengs over the role of the Charter in influencing different elements of the education system as well as the its impact on the institutional design of EDC/HRE in formal, non-formal and informal settings. The participants of the 5 working groups reported on the need to develop a strategy to implement the Charter as well as to facilitate the networking fo the different stakeholders in the Council of Europe member states in the area of education for democratic citizenship and human rights education. This question 5
  6. 6. was further discussed in line with two separate dimensions, i.e. [i] the process of dissemination (considering the translation of the Charter in national languages); and [ii] the ways of implementation (identifying the potential agents of implementation in the Council of Europe member states). School visits The afternoon of the 1st day of the 8th South East Europe (SEE) Networking Conference on Education for Democratic Citizenship and Human Rights was divided in two separate parts. In the first part, the participants had the opportunity to experience a model lesson on on education for democratic citizenship and human rights education. They divided themselves in two groups and visited one elementary and one secondary school where they took part in a classroom activity. The model lesson in a primary school was coordinated by Mr Rolf Gollob and the model lesson in a secondary school by Mr Suad Alić. Launching of the manuals and exhibition of illustrations from the volumes The second part of the afternoon session was devoted to the official launcing of the EDC/HRE manual series and the exhibition of illustrations from the volumes. The participants of the meeting were addressed by Ms Caroline Ravaud, Special Representative of the Secretary General of the Council of Europe, BiH and Mr Benedikt Hauser, Scientific Adviser for multilateral cooperation in Education, Swiss National State Secretariat for Education and Research SER. The EDC/HRE Volume Team of experts including Mr Rolf Gollob, Ms Wiltrud Weidinger, Ms Sabrina Marruncheddu, Mr Peter Krapf and Mr Peti Wiskemann (illustrator/designer) made a short presentation of the working process that occupied them during the preparation of the manuals. FRIDAY, 22 OCTOBER 2010 Plenary and workshop session on good examples of putting Council of Europe materials into practice in the region The 2nd day of the 8th South East Europe (SEE) Networking Conference on Education for Democratic Citizenship and Human Rights was divided in two separate parts. In the first part [Putting the Council of Europe materials into practice], three case studies were presented including ‘the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia’ [presented by Ms Ivanka Mijik], Albania [presented by Mr Astrit Dautaj]; and Serbia [presented by Ms Snežana Vuković and Ms Radmila Radić Dudić]. The second part of this session [Brainstorming on adaptation of tools and manuals] included a workshop session. The plenary session was chaired by Mr Mustafa Acikoz Putting the Council of Europe materials into practice The first case study on putting the Council of Europe materials into practice was presented by Ms Ivanka Mijik on ‘the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia’ and focused on various elements of the organization of the educational system. She then presented the main principles of education in ‘the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia’ (including the principle of democracy, non-discrimination etc.). This was followed by a presentation of the materials and publications published by the Council of Europe. Mr Astrit Dautaj from Albania presented the EDC/HRE provision at the various stages of the educational system in Albania including 6
  7. 7. the curriculum in compulsory education and the teacher training process. Ms Snežana Vuković and Ms Radmila Radić Dudić presented EDC/HRE in Serbia since its introduction in the education system in 2001. They focused on the inclusion of EDC/HRE in the various stages of the education system as well as the strong cooperation with NGOs. Brainstorming on adaptation of tools and manuals The participants of the meeting were divided again into 5 separate working groups where they discussed the various options available to the Council of Europe member states on adapting the tools and manuals. The workshop session was moderated by Mr Rolf Gollob and his colleagues from the Zurich University of Teacher Education. Working group 1 [presented by Mr Astrit Dautaj] presented the results of their work. They have emphasised the various translation priorities and the adaptation of the tools. In particular, they raised the issue of using the manuals as teaching resources and as extracurricular activities. Working group 2 [presented by Ms Wiltrud Weidinger] raised the importance of testing the manuals before their implementation. They emphasised translation as a key factor of a successful implementation as well as the process of adapting the teaching manuals in different educational contexts. Working group 3 [presented by Ms Ivana Kesić] focused on the process of certification that would facilitate the inclusion of the teaching manuals in schools. Working group 4 [presented by the representative from the OSCE] raised the role of different stakeholders and the importance of networking in the area of EDC/HRE. Working group 5 [presented by Ms Sabrina Marruncheddu] shared the conclusions of their working group with the recommendations and conclusions presented by other working groups. Possible paths to take & closing of the meeting This session of the meeting was chaired by Mr Emir Adžović. He pointed out that the various experiences presented and discussed during the meeting show us that there are different ways to support phase IV of the Council of Europe’s EDC/HRE programme through the implementation of the Council of Europe Charter on Education for Democratic Citizenship and Human Rights Education in South East Europe. Ms Sarah KeatingChetwynd emphasized, the translation of the Council of Europe Charter on Education for Democratic Citizenship and Human Rights Education is a crucial step in the implementation and dissemination of EDC/HRE in the Council of Europe member states as will be the focus of the Council of Europe’s work in the years to come. She also announced a major revision of the Council of Europe’s EDC/HRE website in order to provide a platform for the different implementation and dissemination activities. The 8th South East Europe (SEE) Networking Conference on Education for Democratic Citizenship and Human Rights was closed by Ms Sarah Keating-Chetwynd (Council of Europe), Mr Emir Adzovic (Council of Europe) and Mr Mitja Sardoc (the general rapporteur of the meeting). 7
  8. 8. APPENDIX I LIST OF PARTICIPANTS ALBANIA Mr Astrit DAUTAJ Education Specialist Institute for development of Education Rr. “Naim Frashëri”, Nr. 37, TIRANA Mr Robert GJEDIA Chief of NIPE The National Inspectorate for Pre-university Education in Albania (NIPE) Rr”Asim Vokshi” pranë Institutit “Harry Fultz” TIRANA BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA Ms Esma HADŽAGIĆ, Assistant Minister Ministry of Civil Affairs Bosnia and Herzegovina Ms Elma KOSTOVIC Senior Assistant for General Education Ministry of Civil Affairs Bosnia and Herzegovina Mr Suad ALIC Secondary school Hamdije Kreševljakovica br. 55 71000 SARAJEVO BULGARIA Ms Siyka CHAVDAROVA–KOSTOVA Assoc. Prof., Head of Chair “Theory of Education” Faculty of Pedagogy Sofia University “St. Kliment Ohridski” Bul. “Tsar Osvoboditel” 15, room 67 SOFIA, 1504 CROATIA Ms Nevenka LONČARIĆ JELAČIĆ Senior Adviser for the National Curriculums-EDC/HRE Education and Teacher Training Agency Donje Svetice 38, 10 000 ZAGREB, Croatia Ms Renata MILJEVIĆ-RIDICKI Associate Professor of Developmental Psychology Teacher’s Faculty, Zagreb University Savska 77, 10000 ZAGREB 8
  9. 9. MONTENEGRO Ms Bojka DJUKANOVIC Professor Faculty of Philosophy, University of Montenegro Danila Bojovica bb 81400 NIKSIC Ms Vidosava KASCELAN Senior Advisor Bureau for Education Services Vaka Djurovica bb, 81 000 PODGORICA ROMANIA Ms Laura CAPITA Senior Researcher Institute for Education Sciences 37 Stirbei Voda 010102 BUCHAREST 1 Mr Eugen STOICA General Inspector for Social Sciences Ministry of Education, Research Youth and Sport Str. Gen. Berthelot 28-30, Sector 1 70738 BUCHAREST SERBIA Ms Radmila RADIĆ DUDIĆ Civic Education Program Coordinator Civic Intitiatives Simina 9A, 11 000 BELGRADE Ms Snezana VUKOVIC Head of Department for Strategy and Development of Education Ministry of Education Republic of Serbia 22-26 Nemanjina St. 11 33 06 BELGRADE SLOVENIA Ms Pavla KARBA Senior Consultant for Citizenship and Ethics National Education Institute Trg Revolucije 7, 2000 MARIBOR Mr Mitja SARDOC, Researcher Educational Research Institute Gerbičeva 62 1000 LJUBLJANA “THE FORMER YUGOSLAV REPUBLIC OF MACEDONIA” Ms Vesna HORVATOVIKJ, Director (apologised) Bureau for Development of Education 9
  10. 10. Ruger Boskovik bb 1000 SKOPJE Ms Ivanka MIJIKJ Advisor for International Collaboration and Research Projects Bureau for Development of Education Ruger Boskovik bb 1000 SKOPJE TURKEY Mr Haci Mustafa ACIKOZ Member of the Board of Education in Turkey Ministry of National Education of Turkey Talim ve Terbiye Kurulu Başkanliği Teknik Okullar, TR-ANKARA Mr Sevki ISIKLI Social Sciences Expert in Board of Education Ministry of National Education of Turkey Talim ve Terbiye Kurulu Başkanliği Teknik Okullar, TR-ANKARA KOSOVO5 Ms Shqipe GASHI-RAMADANI, Curriculum developer Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (MEST) Street. Agim Ramadani, 10000 PRISTINA (apologised) Ms Luljeta SHALA, Researcher for Innovation and Comparative Studies (apologised) Kosovo Pedagogical Institute Rr.vEqrem Qabej Ndërtesa e Institutit Albanologjik-kati i III, 10000 PRISTINA *** OBSERVERS CIVITAS Ms Ivana KESIC, Program manager Obrazovni Centar za demokratiju i ljudska prava Hamdije Čemerlića 39 71000 SARAJEVO, Bosnia and Herzegovina ETF Ms Lida KITA (apologised) Team Leader of ETF Regional Project on Social Inclusion and Kosovo Country Manager European Training Foundation Viale Settimio Severo 65 10133 TORINO- Italy 5 “All reference to Kosovo, whether to the territory, institutions or population, in this text shall be understood in full compliance with United Nations Security Council Resolution 1244 and without prejudice to the status of Kosovo” 10
  11. 11. ICRC Ms Maja ANDRIC, EHL Regional Adviser for Central and South-Eastern Europe International Committee of the Red Cross Soukbanar 5 SARAJEVO, Bosnia and Herzegovina Open Society Fund Ms Dženan TRBIĆ, Education Program Coordinator Open Society Fund M. Tita 19/111 71000 SARAJEVO, Bosnia and Herzegovina OSCE Mission to Bosnia and Herzegovina Ms Sanna HEIKKININ OSCE Mission to Bosnia and Herzegovina Fra Andela Zvizdovica 1 71000 SARAJEVO, Bosnia and Herzegovina Ms Ivanka MATOVIC OSCE Mission to Bosnia and Herzegovina Fra Andela Zvizdovica 1 71000 SARAJEVO, Bosnia and Herzegovina UNICEF Ms Sanja KABIL, Education Officer Integrated and Inclusive Systems for Children UNICEF B&H Kolodvorska 6 71 000 SARAJEVO, Bosnia and Herzegovina *** GUESTS AND PARTNERS Swiss National State Secretariat for Education and Research (SER) Mr Benedikt HAUSER Scientific Adviser for multilateral cooperation in Education Swiss National State Secretariat for Education and Research (SER) Hallwylstrasse 4 3003 BERN, Switzerland Swiss Cooperation Office Bosnia and Herzegovina Mr Thomas Rüegg Swiss Cooperation Office Bosnia and Herzegovina Pirusa 1 71000 SARAJEVO, Bosnia and Herzegovina “EDC/HRE Volume Team” Mr Rolf GOLLOB, Co-Head IPE – International Projects in Education Zurich University of Teacher Education Hirschengraben 28, CH – 8090 ZÜRICH 11
  12. 12. Mr Peter KRAPF Teacher Training College Weingarten St. Longinus-Strasse 3 88250 WEINGARTEN, Germany Ms Sabrina MARRUNCHEDDU IPE - International Projects in Education Zurich University of Teacher Education Hirschengraben 28, CH – 8090 ZÜRICH Mr Raim MUSTAFI, Project-Coordinator IPE - International Projects in Education Zurich University of Teacher Education Hirschengraben 28, CH – 8090 ZÜRICH Ms Wiltrud WEIDINGER, Co-Head International Projects in Education IPE – International Projects in Education Zurich University of Teacher Education Hirschengraben 28, CH – 8090 ZÜRICH Mr Peti WISKEMANN Illustrator/Designer IPE - International Projects in Education Zurich University of Teacher Education Hirschengraben 28, CH – 8090 ZÜRICH *** SECRETARIAT OF THE COUNCIL OF EUROPE Ms Sarah KEATING-CHETWYND, Head Unit for regional co-operation & joint EC/CoE education programmes in Southeast Europe Agora, DG IV – Education, Council of Europe 67075 STRASBOURG Cedex, France Mr Emir ADZOVIC, Education Co-ordinator Interculturalism and Bologna Process, Programme Co-ordinator Council of Europe Secretariat Office in Kosovo Bedri Pejani 3 10 000 PRISTINA Ms Heather COURANT, Administrative Support Assistant Agora, DG IV – Education, Council of Europe F-67075 STRASBOURG Cedex 12
  13. 13. APPENDIX II Eighth Regional EDC/HRE Networking Conference for South East Europe (SEE) 21-22 October 2010 Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina EVALUATION SHEET 1 The topics of the Conference were covered adequately Strongly disagree Comments: Disagree • • • 2 Neutral Agree Strongly agree 8 9 Very useful for adopting of EDC/HRE tools in our context All topics have been very useful. Process of learning have been useful. School visit – thank you for that The content of the Conference was logically sequenced and stimulating Strongly disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly agree 1 7 9 Comments: 3 The format of the Conference (presentation on each topic, discussion, etc.) Not Satisfied at all Dissatisfied Neutral Satisfied Fully satisfied 1 10 6 Comments: • Well organised and guided • More PPT otherwise we cannot follow the content 4 The level of discussion/interaction among the participants (peerlearning) Not Satisfied at all Dissatisfied Neutral Satisfied Fully satisfied 8 9 Comments: • We have learned the different experiences about EDC/HRE in the region • Lots of useful information on actual introduction in approaches to EDC/HRE implementation • There were time and space to plan future activities and co-operation 13
  14. 14. 5 Professionally, the Conference was useful for me Strongly disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly agree 5 12 Comements • Lots of lessons learned will implement in my future professional work 6 Personally, the Conference was a rewarding learning experience Strongly disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly agree 8 8 Comments 7 I am satisfied with the quality of the venue and catering. Not Satisfied at all 8 Neutral Satisfied Fully satisfied 1 Comments: Dissatisfied 1 10 6 • Too cold! No wi-fi in conference room. I am satisfied with the rest of the facilities Strongly disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly agree 1 11 5 Comments: 9 In your opinion, how could this event be carried out in a better way? • • • • • • The visit in the schools was very interesting and it was a good idea to ahve this activity, to have the contact with students in EDC themes Change of venue More involvement of the MoE BiH would be beneficial More workshops in the future Because of the new people, we should have introduced ourselves Aim of workshops was sometimes not clearly formulated 14

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