Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
7 types of collaborative services and more
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

7 types of collaborative services and more

785

Published on

7 types of collaborative services on the digital platform and more

7 types of collaborative services on the digital platform and more

Published in: Design, Business, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
785
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
15
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Designing collabora.ve services on the  digital pla4orm  The role of ICT in the diffusion of social innova5on  Baek Joon Sang  PhD candidate  DIS‐INDACO   Politecnico di Milano  
  • 2. “How does ICT influence collabora5ve  services?” 
  • 3. Preliminary research: Case studies  •  Aim: To collect the cases of collabora5ve service on the digital  plaForm. To iden5fy the use of ICT in collabora5ve services  and their impact on the social network of collabora5ve  organiza5ons    •  Partner: The Founda5on of Banca E5ca  •  Period: 2008 November ~ 2009 July  •  Method: Website analysis, interview (on and offline)  •  Results: Light analysis of 25 cases, in‐depth analysis of 10  cases h[p://www.sustainable‐everyday.net/codi/?cat=1 
  • 4. Criteria for selec.ng the cases  •  More than 100 candidates of digital solu5ons – web and  mobile plaForms – have been looked into.  •  25 Cases were selected using the three criteria:  1.  A service uses informa5on communica5on technologies to  promote itself and enhance communica5on within community.   2.  A service requires collabora5on in both the physical and the  digital worlds.   3.  A service must be designed and provided by users in order to  sa5sfy their unmet social needs. Therefore, government or  corporate‐oriented cases were excluded.  •  10 Cases were selected from the 25 cases for in‐depth  analysis. 
  • 5. Grofun  Green map  Pledgebank  Open green map  Ac5vmob  Couch surfing  No 10 Pe55ons  Meetup  FixMyStreet  Diabe5cs' meetup  Hitchhikers  mySociety.org  Katrinalist.net  RED Open  Shelfari  Health Project  Bookcrossing  Aka aki  Hope ins5tute  Carrotmob  Mapo dure  Vicini vicini  Economia solidale  Zero rela5vo  One life Japan  Peladeiros  Solidarius  Sistema FBES 
  • 6. Finding 1. 7 types of collabora.ve service  1.  Producer/consumer network  2.  Mapping diffused informa5on  3.  Aggregate social ac5on  4.  Crea5ng social network for conviviality  5.  Mutual support circle  6.  Competences, 5me and products exchange  7.  Products, places and knowledge sharing 
  • 7. 1. Producers/consumers network   Producer/consumer network is a type of collabora5ve service in  which producers and consumers pursue mutual benefits by  establishing a direct network.  
  • 8. 2. Mapping diffused informa.on  Mapping diffused informa5on is a collabora5ve service in which  users collaborate to map diffused loca5onal informa5on. 
  • 9. 3. Aggregated social ac.on  Aggregated social ac5on is a collabora5ve service in which  people act together and use their collec5ve power to achieve  social goals. 
  • 10. 4. Crea.ng social network for conviviality  Crea5ng social network for conviviality is a collabora5ve service  whose primary goal is to improve social conviviality by forming  and reinforcing a social network. People are onen from the same  locality and interact face‐to‐face and virtually on a regular basis.  
  • 11. 5. Mutual‐support circles  Mutual support circles are a collabora5ve service where people  provide mutual support to one another in order to solve problems  that they have in common. 
  • 12. 6. Competences, .me and products exchange   Competences, 5me and products exchange is a collabora5ve  service in which people collaborate through the exchange of  competences, 5me and products. 
  • 13. 7. Products, places and knowledge sharing   Products, places knowledge sharing is a collabora5ve service in  which people collaborate through sharing products, places and  knowledge. 
  • 14. Theories  1.  The strength of weak 5es (Granove[er, 1973)  2.  ICT and social capital (Wellman, 2001) 
  • 15. The strength of weak .es  Mark Granove[er claimed that there exist three types of personal 5es:  strong, weak and absent. The strength of the personal 5e is  characterized by the amount of 3me, the emo3onal intensity, the  in3macy and the reciprocal services. He analyzed the spread of  informa5on in social networks and claimed that informa5on spreads  through the weak 5es. 
  • 16. GranoveOer’s two types of social .es  The comparison of Granove<er’s strong 3es and weak 3es Strong 5e  Weak 5e  •  ormed between families, cliques,  F •  ormed by any kind of interac5on  F rela5ves  •  akes arguably decades to be formed  T •  akes rela5vely short 5me to be formed  T •  bserved in a group  O •  bserved in a network  O • nforma5on is self‐contained  I • nforma5on is diffused   I
  • 17. GranoveOer’s two types of social .es  The comparison of Granove<er’s strong 3es and weak 3es Strong 5e  Weak 5e  •  ormed between families, cliques,  F •  ormed by any kind of interac5on  F rela5ves  •  akes arguably decades to be formed  T •  akes rela5vely short 5me to be formed  T •  bserved in a group  O •  bserved in a network  O • nforma5on is self‐contained  I • nforma5on is diffused   I
  • 18. The strength of weak .es  “Individuals with many weak 3es are … best placed to diffuse a difficult  innova3on, since some of those 3es will be local bridges (bridges that  connect two groups in a network) .”  (Granove<er, 1973)  
  • 19. ICT and social network  In general, there are three different views on how ICT influences  social network:  1.  ICT increases social network  2.  ICT decreases social network  3.  ICT supplements social network 
  • 20. ICT and social network  In general, there are three different views on how ICT influences  social network:  1.  ICT increases social network  2.  ICT decreases social network  3.  ICT supplements social network  ‐> ICT reinforces the exis5ng social networks and also creates  (mainly) the weak 5es in the virtual space. (Wellman et al., 2001)  
  • 21. Group vs. Network  •  Group vs. Network (Wellman, 2004)  Group  Network  •  ightly‐knit and clearly‐bounded  T •  parsely‐knit and loosely‐bounded  S • mpermeable  I •  ermeable  P •  hought of as a solidary unit  T •  et of connected units: people,  S organiza5ons, networks  •   person belongs to one group  A •   person can belong to mul5ple  A networks  •  xamples: family, workgroup,  E •  xamples: friendship, terrorist, cash  E community  flows, internet  •  Networked individualism: Socie5es are transforming from group‐ based to network‐based (Wellman 2006) and the no5on of  community is also changing.  •  ICT is facilita5ng such transforma5on. It enhances weak online 5es.  (Kraut et al. 2001) 
  • 22. Phenomena  1.  Changing no5on of community (Wellman, 1973)  2.  Emerging new tools for collabora5on 
  • 23. Changing no.on of community  The no5on of community ‐ the main target and simultaneously a  precondi5on of design for social innova5on and sustainability ‐ is  also changing.  “a group of interac5ng people living in a common loca5on” 
  • 24. Changing no.on of community  The no5on of community ‐ the main target and simultaneously a  precondi5on of design for social innova5on and sustainability ‐ is  also changing.  “a group of interac5ng people living in a common loca5on”  Characteris5cs of new communi5es  •  he ability to connect with mul3ple social milieus, with limited involvement  T in each milieu.  •  ecreased control over inhabitants and reduced sense of belonging to  D milieus.  •  educed iden3ty and pressures of belonging to groups.  R •  c3ve networking is more important than going along with the group.  A
  • 25. Changing no.on of community  The no5on of community ‐ the main target and simultaneously a  precondi5on of design for social innova5on and sustainability ‐ is  also changing.  “a group of interac5ng people living in a common loca5on”  “the networks of interpersonal 5es that provide sociability,  support, informa5on, a sense of belonging, and social  iden5ty” 
  • 26. Emerging new tools for collabora.on  Collabora5on benefits from ICT through:  •  Sharing and crea5ng the Crea5ve Commons  •  Various tools that enable easy and efficient communica5on  and interac5on between the par5cipants  •  Easy par5cipa5on and withdrawal from collabora5on thereby  lowering the threshold of par5cipa5on  •  Various incen5ve mechanisms that mo5vate people to  collaborate 
  • 27. Collabora.ve services on the digital pla4orm  A hybrid between physical and virtual spaces, local and global  contexts.  
  • 28. Finding 2. The structural system of collabora.ve services  A platform hosts one or more enabling solutions PlaForm  e.g.) Zoes
  • 29. Finding 2. The structural system of collabora.ve services  An enabling solution motivates and empowers people to Enabling solu5on   create a service to meet their needs e.g.) Meetup A platform hosts one or more enabling solutions PlaForm  e.g.) Zoes
  • 30. Finding 2. The structural system of collabora.ve services  Collabora5ve  A service created by users involves activities in the digital service  and/or physical world. e.g.) Seattle Social Diabetics An enabling solution motivates and empowers people to Enabling solu5on   create a service to meet their needs e.g.) Meetup A platform hosts one or more enabling solutions PlaForm  e.g.) Zoes
  • 31. Finding 2. The structural system of collabora.ve services  An event is the result of a collaborative service in digital and/or Event  physical form. e.g.) Diabetics Collabora5ve  A service created by users involves activities in the digital service  and/or physical world. e.g.) Seattle Social Diabetics An enabling solution motivates and empowers people to Enabling solu5on   create a service to meet their needs e.g.) Meetup A platform hosts one or more enabling solutions PlaForm  e.g.) Zoes
  • 32. Findings 2. Typologies of social networks 
  • 33. Findings 2. Typologies based on the SN structure 
  • 34. Networked individuals 
  • 35. Networked individuals 
  • 36. A group and individuals 
  • 37. A group and individuals 
  • 38. Mutually interac.ve individuals 
  • 39. Mutually interac.ve individuals 
  • 40. Networked groups 
  • 41. Networked groups 
  • 42. Rela5onal paBerns in basic ICT solu5ons  ICT used by the collected cases was broken down into basic func5onal  units and they were viewed in rela5on to how informa5on flows, and  therefore, how rela5on is formed.  node: transmitter and receiver, arrow: flow of information, view point: user 
  • 43. Rela5onal paBerns in basic ICT solu5ons  ICT used by the collected cases was broken down into basic func5onal  units and they were viewed in rela5on to how informa5on flows, and  therefore, how rela5on is formed.  node: transmitter and receiver, arrow: flow of information, view point: user 
  • 44. Networked groups  •  Cases: GAS, Ac5vmob, TimeBanks, Meetup,  Peladeiros, Vicini Vicini, Green Map, Dure Coop  •  Typologies: Producer/consumer network, Mutual  support circles, Competences, 5me and products  exchange  •  Technologies: mailing list, web‐based 5me‐ management sonware, newsle[er, blog, e‐ commerce plaForm, a website with news,  photos, movies and other resources  •  Type of interac5on: one to one, one to many  •  Tie strength: weak (mainly), strong, poten5al  •  SN sketch: In this typology, users form groups in  which they are connected though weak and  strong 5es. The groups are then connected with  other groups through poten5al or weak 5es. It is  like a network of franchises based on P2P  organiza5onal structure. At the center lies a  headquarter that pioneered the service and is  diffusing it successfully. Cases that have diffused  successfully have as many as millions of users. 
  • 45. Finding 3. Weak/strong .es in collabora.ve services  Both the weak 5es and strong 5es in collabora5ve organiza5ons  are essen5al to the services produced by them but they play  different roles.    Strong 5es:  •  exist mainly in a community (in the tradi3onal sense) where collabora3on  ini3ates and is incubated  •  maintain core values of the service  Weak 5es:  •  Maintain an organiza3on open  •  allow innova3ve ideas to diffuse and replicate  •  connect collabora3ve organiza3ons into a network 
  • 46. Finding 3. Weak/strong .es in collabora.ve services  Diagnosis  Design  Development  Sustaining innova5on  Scaling, diffusing and connec5ng  Systemic innova5on 
  • 47. Finding 3. Weak/strong .es in collabora.ve services  Diagnosis  Design  Development  Sustaining innova5on  Scaling, diffusing and connec5ng  Weak ties Systemic innova5on  Strong ties
  • 48. Finding 3. Weak/strong .es in collabora.ve services  Diagnosis  Design  Development  Sustaining innova5on  Scaling, diffusing and connec5ng  Weak ties Systemic innova5on  Strong ties
  • 49. Finding 3. Weak/strong .es in collabora.ve services  Diagnosis  Design  Development  Sustaining innova5on  Scaling, diffusing and connec5ng  Weak ties Systemic innova5on  Strong ties
  • 50. A new approach to collabora.ve service design  If we can use ICT to direct a social network in a way favorable to  designing and scaling up collabora5ve services and if we  systemize this approach and create a new tool, this tool can  empower designers/developers to design an enabling solu5on  that best prac5ces available technologies and social networks for  the diffusion of the collabora5ve services it supports. 
  • 51. Thank you. 

×