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Assessing and Progressing Digital Literacies as a Strategic Concern

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Conference workshop at the 2013 International Blended Learning Conference, University of Hertfordshire. Authors: Helen Beetham, Julian Prior, Neil Witt.

Conference workshop at the 2013 International Blended Learning Conference, University of Hertfordshire. Authors: Helen Beetham, Julian Prior, Neil Witt.

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  • 30 secs - 1 min introducing myself and outlining key aims and objectives of PriDE i.e: Establishing an institutional vision for the development of DLs; Embedding DL across the curriculum and at the core of the strategic planning process (essentially change management) Mapping how disciplinary differences and cultures shape the development of DLs
  • Local context: DL and PriDE is one aspect of wider work on the Digital Environment at Bath (see Kyriaki ’ s paper – submitted to the PVC Learning and Teaching) – HOLISTIC APPROACH Student Experience Working Group and Student Union Student Experience and Satisfaction – NSS and SU – importance of e-Learning and access to digital tools and technologies to enhance learning. Need for consistency of experience and a strategic vision for students across the lifecycle. Students report that they do not feel ‘ connected ’ when they come to university. ‘ disconnect ’ between home/work and study life. Also - Employability in Digital Age, Competition in HE between universities – competitive advantage of a digital environment. DE can be many thanks to many people – staff, admin, researchers, employers, applicants Talk about Personalised Environment – 14,000 students, personalisation of tech BYOS, BYOD. Not a single ‘ digital student or staff experience ’ . Infrastructure, systems, processes, online and physical spaces/learning environments, access to resources, research experience etc. Many stakeholders – past (alumni), present and future students, staff throughout the institution (challenging) PriDE focuses on the skills, competencies, capabilities and practices. Tweeting, blogging, assignments online etc. Challenge = glueing bits together into an institution-wide strategy that involves all stakeholders. Alumni, marketing etc.
  • 4 ways that we carried out the baseline audit
  • Skills, access to tools and technologies rather than identity and practices Curriculum – DL not embedded in curriculum – students expected to come with DL skills or gain them through other – less formal - means Devt of DE – part of bigger picture – skills, capabilities
  • Learners are relying increasingly on the use of their own technology for study and for assessment. Learners are therefore sometimes ‘ bypassing ’ college technology in order to use technology which they are more comfortable with, have personal control of and which is, possibly, more advanced. This raises issues about provision of public wifi for learners and wifi access to college networks. Of the five colleges in the PADDLE project only Yale have wifi access across their main campus which allows learners to use their own technology in the classroom. Other colleges have some areas with public wifi (these tend to be in public spaces and not the classroom) or wifi access for institutional hardware.   Tutors are allowing the use of the learner ’ s own technology (for assessment) where it is possible to capture and store the use of such technologies (in line with traditional assessment methods). This raises the issue of the barriers to learning faced by the technology ‘ have nots ’ . Again Yale College is tackling this barrier by providing loanable sets of laptops for classroom use.
  • Learners are relying increasingly on the use of their own technology for study and for assessment. Learners are therefore sometimes ‘ bypassing ’ college technology in order to use technology which they are more comfortable with, have personal control of and which is, possibly, more advanced. This raises issues about provision of public wifi for learners and wifi access to college networks. Of the five colleges in the PADDLE project only Yale have wifi access across their main campus which allows learners to use their own technology in the classroom. Other colleges have some areas with public wifi (these tend to be in public spaces and not the classroom) or wifi access for institutional hardware.   Tutors are allowing the use of the learner ’ s own technology (for assessment) where it is possible to capture and store the use of such technologies (in line with traditional assessment methods). This raises the issue of the barriers to learning faced by the technology ‘ have nots ’ . Again Yale College is tackling this barrier by providing loanable sets of laptops for classroom use.
  • Learners are relying increasingly on the use of their own technology for study and for assessment. Learners are therefore sometimes ‘ bypassing ’ college technology in order to use technology which they are more comfortable with, have personal control of and which is, possibly, more advanced. This raises issues about provision of public wifi for learners and wifi access to college networks. Of the five colleges in the PADDLE project only Yale have wifi access across their main campus which allows learners to use their own technology in the classroom. Other colleges have some areas with public wifi (these tend to be in public spaces and not the classroom) or wifi access for institutional hardware.   Tutors are allowing the use of the learner ’ s own technology (for assessment) where it is possible to capture and store the use of such technologies (in line with traditional assessment methods). This raises the issue of the barriers to learning faced by the technology ‘ have nots ’ . Again Yale College is tackling this barrier by providing loanable sets of laptops for classroom use.
  • Learners are relying increasingly on the use of their own technology for study and for assessment. Learners are therefore sometimes ‘ bypassing ’ college technology in order to use technology which they are more comfortable with, have personal control of and which is, possibly, more advanced. This raises issues about provision of public wifi for learners and wifi access to college networks. Of the five colleges in the PADDLE project only Yale have wifi access across their main campus which allows learners to use their own technology in the classroom. Other colleges have some areas with public wifi (these tend to be in public spaces and not the classroom) or wifi access for institutional hardware.   Tutors are allowing the use of the learner ’ s own technology (for assessment) where it is possible to capture and store the use of such technologies (in line with traditional assessment methods). This raises the issue of the barriers to learning faced by the technology ‘ have nots ’ . Again Yale College is tackling this barrier by providing loanable sets of laptops for classroom use.
  • Draft of briefing paper for consultation Support you to convince your managers of the need for change Giving them permission to look at new approaches and the arguments why they need to change Key messages around Reviewing existing learning environments Connecting and sharing Opening institutional data Creating a seamless student experience
  • Transcript

    • 1. Assessing and progressingDigital Literacies as a strategic concernHelen Beetham | Julian Prior | Neil Witt#jiscdiglit
    • 2. What do we mean by digital literacy?We’re working with colleges anduniversities to embed digitalliteracies into the curriculum.By digital literacies we meanthose capabilities which fit anindividual for living, learning andworking in a digital society:for example using digital tools toundertake academic research;for writing and critical thinking;as part of personal developmentplanning; and to showcaseachievements.
    • 3. Developing Digital Literacies ProgrammeA sector-wide programmepromoting the developmentof coherent, inclusive andholistic institutionalstrategies and organisationalapproaches for developingdigital literacies for staff andstudents in UK further andhigher education.
    • 4. Assessing where we are todayInstitutional projects started out with a baselineaudit to assess current:1.Policy and strategy2.Infrastructure3.Support and professional services4.Practices in the curriculum5.Developing capability and expertise6.Cultures and attitudes
    • 5. What was the experience like?Exeter Cascade project – focus on digitalscholarship and the experience of researchersand students in a research-intensive universityBath Pride project – focus on disciplinary aspectsof digital literacy and embedding digitalcapability into the curriculumPlymouth SeedPod project – focus on students intransition to HE and institutional restructuringaround a digital agendaHow is this like in your institution? How different?
    • 6. Exeter Cascade projectBaseline report and beyond
    • 7. Focus and purpose of baseline Project aims to implement a range of innovativestrategies which ensure that students and staff developtheir digital capabilities in the context of their owndisciplines Focus is on digital scholarship, collaboration across thecurriculum, and postgraduate researchers as changeagents Needed to find out how digital scholarship is perceivedand understood, how it is practiced, and how it issupported by policy, infrastructure, and professionalservices
    • 8. Methods Closely followed JISC structure and audit tools Review of existing policies, strategies andprofessional services, plus Online survey distributed to PGRs in fivecolleges: 169 responses 3 focus groups totalling 13 PGRs Interviews with 18 individual PGRs Interviews with 16 academic and 11 professionalstaff
    • 9. Key messages Strategic focus on research excellence, global position Push for digital scholarship to support innovation in research,teaching, and knowledge transfer Infrastructure issues: network being upgraded, move to bring yourown device/ service (BYOD/BYOS) Culture is collegial and devolved: limited control from centre Expertise: PGRs are using a wide range of technologies esp social,third-party/cloud, mobile Particularly pioneering in their approaches to data capture, datavisualisation, virtual collaboration and digital networking PGRs develop expertise: thru exploration, self-reliance, peers, butneed more structured support for advanced uses Potential for PGRs to be 360-degree change agents (but...) Professional/support services also have key role to play
    • 10. Professionalism in the Digital Environment (PriDE)University of BathProject manager: Kyriaki AnagnostopoulouK.Anagnostopoulou@bath.ac.ukProject officer: Julian Prior J.Prior2@bath.ac.ukProject officer (Dissemination): Sarah TurpinProject Adviser: Matt Benkahttp://digilitpride.wordpress.com/
    • 11. Digital environmentForStaffStudentsOther stakeholdersWhenPre-entryWhilst at uniAlumniManifestsOnlineIn physicalspacesNeed todevelopSkills, competenciesand capabilities Infrastructureand systemsProvidesaccessInfoResourcesAdministrationLearning ExperiencesResearchFunctionsCommunicationCollaborationAdministrationLearning
    • 12. BASELINE METHODOLOGY1. Semi-structuredinterviews2. Scoping andHorizon Scanning4. Faculty LearningCommunities3. Website andDocument Audit
    • 13. FLCFLCFLCFLCInstitutionalLearningCommunityUKOLNVITAESCAPSUETCStudent engagementFaculty LearningCommunities (FLCs)Define and articulate ‘digitalliteracies’ in the disciplinesAudit and carry out needsanalysis for students/staff
    • 14. Lessons learnedo Strategic documentation refers explicitly to provision ofaccess and implicitly to skills development – but not todeveloping practiceso Digital literacy skills/practices not routinely designed intocurriculumo Provision of hardware/software and support for non-standard users – including user expectationso Barriers to supporting students in digital literacy – timeand ‘not knowing what I need to know’o Development of Digital Environment - DL part of the widerpicture
    • 15. 13/06/12Prof Neil WittHead of Technology Enhanced LearningDigital Literacy - Baseline
    • 16. 13/06/12Domains of interest•In relation to support for staff and students•In relation to teaching staff•In relation to curriculum design•In relation to student and staff skills•In relation to the Plymouth University offer•In relation to systems
    • 17. 13/06/12Building the evidence base•Survey response from 2000+ students•Focus groups with students and staff•Review of policies and strategies•Stakeholder engagement across the institution•Embedding Digital Literacy into PersonalDevelopment Review Process•Informs our new Digital Strategy•Baseline summary athttp://hdl.handle.net/10293/1580
    • 18. 13/06/12Ready to move ahead•New department from August 2012Academic Support, Technology and Innovation (ASTI)–Digital Literacy Team–Engagement and Support Team–eAssessment Team–Projects/Innovation Team–Inputs into Curriculum Design•ASTI structure informed by SEEDPOD baseline–ensures the embedding of DL into Curriculum Design andStaff Development & Support
    • 19. Baselining your own institutional experienceIf you are online it might help to look at the baselineframework for institutions: http://bit.ly/KCACYaand/or at the audit tools: http://bit.ly/LB58EkAlso look at the tools provided on your table
    • 20. Activity (alone or in pairs/threes)Choose an audit area:1.Policy and strategy2.Infrastructure3.Support and professional services4.Practices in the curriculum5.Developing capability and expertise6.Cultures and attitudesConsider/discuss:- What do we need to know?- How could we find out?- Who would need to be involved?- What would be the benefits of an audit?
    • 21. Feedback- What do you need to know?- How could you find out?- Who would need to be involved?- What would be the benefits of an audit?
    • 22. FeedforwardWhat kind of outcomes/resources would you find mosthelpful from the programme?- resources for direct access by students- resources for embedding into the curriculum- resources for curriculum teams- resources for professional services- resources for strategic managersThere are some early examples on yourtables to explore
    • 23. Further information on baseliningSummary of the project baseline reports:http://bit.ly/JiUV0mSummary of the professional association baselinereports: http://bit.ly/KWFJUoInstitutional videos from the Developing DigitalLiteracies projects visit http://bit.ly/jiscdlprogvideos tohear about how they are implementing digital literaciesat a strategic levelBaselining resources from the JISC Design Studioincluding institutional audit tools: http://bit.ly/Nz1g8t
    • 24. Programme information and resourcesProgramme blog - http://elearningprogs.jiscinvolve.orgDigital Literacies Webinars - http://bit.ly/HKbYoyJoin JISC-DIGLIT-PUBLIC@jiscmail.ac.ukFollow #jiscdiglitCome and speak to us at the Blended Learning Conference, HEAConference, Greenwich e-Learning Conference, ALT-C, SEDA...JISC on Air online radio programmes:http://www.jisc.ac.uk/jisconairDeveloping Digital Literacies webinar – Where are we now andwhat have we learnt? – Helen Beetham, date tbc early July
    • 25. Developing Digital Literaciesbriefing paper.Developing Digital Literacies Briefingpaper available in June 2012, fromhttp://bit.ly/ddl-prog and available toorder from publications@jisc.ac.ukProvides a summary of the contextand emerging outcomes of theprogramme together with links torelevant resources“Digital literacy is the intersection betweendigital knowhow and academic practice.Or, if you want to frame it differently, theability to learn, the ability to learn well.”Helen Beetham, Synthesis consultant