What is the Gospel? What are the Gospels?
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

What is the Gospel? What are the Gospels?

on

  • 350 views

Keynotes used in class for WTC residential.

Keynotes used in class for WTC residential.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
350
Views on SlideShare
350
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
4
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • (1) Family, 3 kids, I’m also a curate. I was a teacher in (2) St Georges Church (3) Nicodemus who came by night Acts 1:1 (ESV) 1 In the first book, O Theophilus, I have dealt with all that Jesus began to do and teach, (4) Scripture.... was a teacher but over the last 10 years have studied a number of things Maths, catholic college.... Sheffield.... Theology/Biblical Studies Trinity Bristol.... MLitt 100,000 including footnotes entitled death of the divien warrior
  • (S to F, Daily, Thematically, w/ commentary, (face to Face, Email, Skype, Twitter, hub nights)
  • Next Slide is Prayer Video.
  • Toplady prayer Teach us, O Lord, the way of your statutes, and make us keep it unto the end. Incline our hearts to your testimonies, and cause us to go in the path of your commandments, for therein is our desire. May the law of your mouth be dearer unto us than thousands of gold and silver; and let your Holy Spirit accompany your Word with saving power to our souls, through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.
  • Under a blanket? Question to Students: What is the Gospel? (1) God loves you and offers a wonderful plan for your life. (2) Man is sinful and separated from God. Therefore, he cannot know and experience God's love and plan for his life. (3)Jesus Christ is God's only provision for man's sin. Through Him you can know and experience God's love and plan for your life. (4)We must individually receive Jesus Christ as Savior and Lord; then we can know and experience God's love and plan for our lives.
  • gospel: about 100 times in the new testament gospel. 66 as noun times, 21 as euangelizomai proclaim annoucne good news
  • gospel: 97 times in NT euangelizomai proclaim annoucne good news
  • Priene Inscription , one example somewhere near Ephesus, erected on stone blocks and placed int he ciites of the roman world.Augustus Ruled from 27 BC until his death in 14 AD encouarge switch from a lunar to a solar calender Pax Romana http://glenandpaula.com/wordpress/archives/2010/02/25/pre-christian-uses-of-gospel google: pre christian uses of gospel NEWS OF VICTORY IN BATTLE, BIRTH OF A GREAT PERSON, DEATH OF SOMONE, APPROACHIGN WEDDING, SPECIAL MESSANGER -------- In the LXX, Septuagint it also used to when talkign about the coming reign of God. ISaiah 40:0,   How beautiful upon the mountains are the feet of him who brings good news, who publishes peace, who brings good news of happiness, who publishes salvation, who says to Zion, “Your God reigns.” 8  The voice of your watchmen—they lift up their voice; together they sing for joy; for eye to eye they see the return of the Lord to Zion. (Isaiah 52:7-8 Isaiah 40:9 9  Go on up to a high mountain, O Zion, herald of good news; lift up your voice with strength, O Jerusalem, herald of good news; lift it up, fear not; say to the cities of Judah, “ Behold your God!”
  • The letter was written during this time in Ephesus, which is usually dated as being in mid 50’s... so just 20 years after the death of Jesus.
  • Date: late 55/early 56 or late 56/early 57 City of a million, to a church of maybe 100. Do the tour of Acts.....
  • Acts 2:14-39 The story of Israel is the story of God in the world, and Israel’s story finds its completion in Jesus. The story of Jesus brings Israel’s story to its completion. Christ died “for our sins” Jesus is the Messiah, King of God’s kingdom, Saviour, Son of God and Lord. Unlike the Soterian gospel (which is more ‘me’ oriented), the authenti c gospel b eing depicted by McKnight is one that is more likely to lead to discipleship and being active in the Kingdom. When people can see themselves in the story, it’s easy for them to relate and be drawn into the larger story. When we understand our ongoing role in the Kingdom of God here on Earth, our existing missional work and callings (whether it is justice-based, or environmentally-based etc.) become something for eternity.
  • Acts 2:14-39 The story of Israel is the story of God in the world, and Israel’s story finds its completion in Jesus. The story of Jesus brings Israel’s story to its completion. Christ died “for our sins” Jesus is the Messiah, King of God’s kingdom, Saviour, Son of God and Lord. Unlike the Soterian gospel (which is more ‘me’ oriented), the authentic gospel being depicted by McKnight is one that is more likely to lead to discipleship and being active in the Kingdom. When people can see themselves in the story, it’s easy for them to relate and be drawn into the larger story. When we understand our ongoing role in the Kingdom of God here on Earth, our existing missional work and callings (whether it is justice-based, or environmentally-based etc.) become something for eternity.
  • Each of the four Gospels— Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John —paints a unique portrait of Jesus Christ. Each provides special insight into who he is and what he accomplished. The Gospels exhibit both unity and diversity , bearing witness to the same Jesus (unity) but viewing him from unique perspectives (diversity). What are these four unique portraits? At the risk of oversimplifying, we may say that Matthew presents Jesus as the Jewish Messiah , the fulfillment of Old Testament hopes; ( 14 Times) English Standard Version 16 results in 16 verses Matt 1:22 All this took place to fulfill what the Lord had spoken by the prophet: Matt 2:15 and remained there until the death of Herod. This was to fulfill what the Lord had spoken by the prophet, “Out of Egypt I called my son.” Matt 2:17 Then was fulfilled what was spoken by the prophet Jeremiah: Matt 2:23 And he went and lived in a city called Nazareth, so that what was spoken by the prophets might be fulfilled , that he would be called a Nazarene. Matt 3:15 But Jesus answered him, “Let it be so now, for thus it is fitting for us to fulfill all righteousness.” Then he consented. Matt 4:14 so that what was spoken by the prophet Isaiah might be fulfilled : Matt 5:17 “ Do not think that I have come to abolish the Law or the Prophets; I have not come to abolish them but to fulfill them. Matt 8:17 This was to fulfill what was spoken by the prophet Isaiah: “He took our illnesses and bore our diseases.” Matt 12:17 This was to fulfill what was spoken by the prophet Isaiah: Matt 13:35 This was to fulfill what was spoken by the prophet: “I will open my mouth in parables; I will utter what has been hidden since the foundation of the world.” Matt 21:4 This took place to fulfill what was spoken by the prophet, saying, Matt 26:54 But how then should the Scriptures be fulfilled , that it must be so?” Matt 26:56 But all this has taken place that the Scriptures of the prophets might be fulfilled .” Then all the disciples left him and fled. Matt 27:9 Then was fulfilled what had been spoken by the prophet Jeremiah, saying, “And they took the thirty pieces of silver, the price of him on whom a price had been set by some of the sons of Israel, -----
  • Mirrors the Pentateuch? (Bacon Studies in Matthew 1930)
  • Mark portrays him as the suffering Son of God , who offers himself as a sacrifice for sins; Martin Kahler called Mark a "passion narrative with a long introduction.. From chapter eight onwards he is on his way to Jeruslaem. Mark 10:45 ‘Ransom for Many’ , three Passion Predictions Cry from the Cross Short Ending. No Witnesses to the Resserection style and wording are different not there in the the best and ancient biographies awkard, why is MAry identified as the one who demons were cast out of 15.47 and 16.1 -------- Most Dramatic (1) Jesus is Emotionalluy Intense (cf. impassability) a. Sighing deeply in His spirit -- 7:34; 8:12. b. Moved with compassion -- 6:31. c. Marvelling at their unbelief -- 6:6. d. Moved with righteous anger -- 3:5; 8:33; 10:14. e. Looking with love on the rich young ruler -- 10:21. f. Feeling the pangs of hunger -- 11:12. g. Becoming tired and needing rest -- 6:31. God is passionate about , shows Jesus’ humaness YHWH is an emotional God, Classic theism teaches that God is impassible — not subject to suffering, pain, or the ebb and flow of involuntary passions. In the words of the Westminster Confession of Faith, God is "without body, parts, or passions, immutable. Classical theism, God is immutable... God does not change. God grievesd when someon does of a heroine overdoze. Mark portrays Jesus in action and urgent action at that.  In the first chapter alone we can sense the urgency and immediacy of Jesus' work and mission. Mark uses the word  "immediately" no less than eight times.  For example, he says the "Spirit immediately drove him out into the wilderness" (Mark 1:12).  "And immediately he called them" (Mk 1:20); "and immediately on the sabbath he entered the synagogue and taught" (Mk 1:21); "and immediately the leprosy left him" (Mk 1:42).
  • Luke: The Gospel of the Saviour fo All People Saviour for All People: Gentiles Luke 2:32 ‘all peoples’, ‘light for revelation to Gentiles’ Luke 3:5 (cites Isa. 40:5) : 5  And the glory of the Lord shall be revealed, and all flesh shall see it together, for the mouth of the Lord has spoken.” 0 Luke 4:25-27 .... but excludes     ‘’and the day of vengeance of our God’, it is fullfilled, prophet not accepted in his own town, mentions gentiles (outsiders from the covenenat community) Luke 10:1-16 (Luke 9:1-6). 70 number of nations (gen 10: 70 names in Hebrew, 72 in LXX) Luke 14:16-24, v22 absent in Matt 22:1-14 Luke 24:47 (all nations)
  • Lukan Themes: Salvation for Outsiders (Poor and Oppressed, Sinners and Tax Collectors, Samaritans)
  • popular folk literature? fairy tales? straight history? anicient biography βίοι. ... there is a family resemblance narrative focused on a main character , who models virtue.... shows the essence of the main figure, by recounting incidents and sayings that display and prove his charcetr not neccesarily chronological not whole of the life regarding birth often mention ancestrry (family, cirty)...but narrtaive moves wuicly to the persons public life aims: apologetuc, polemic (attack reivals), didactic (teach about him) attention stays on oner person fit on a single scroll focsu on death of the character See Dictionary New Tesmant Background : Anicent Biography, Richard Burridge
  • popular folk literature? fairy tales? straight history? anicent biography ... there is a family resemblance narrative focused on a main character , who models virtue.... shows the essence of the main figure, by recounting incidents and sayings that display and prove his charcetr not neccesarily chronological not whole of the life regarding birth often mention ancestrry (family, cirty)...but narrtaive moves wuicly to the persons public life aims: apologetuc, polemic (attack reivals), didactic (teach about him) attention stays on oner person fit on a single scroll focsu on death of the character See Dictionary New Tesmant Background : Anicent Biography, Richard Burridge
  • Historical: The need for a faithful and authoritative record of the words and deeds of Jesus . The apostles would not live forever, and the Gospel writers wanted to preserve the traditions that had been entrusted to them. Catechetical: The need to instruct converts in the Christian faith . New believers coming into the church needed to be instructed concerning the words and deeds of Jesus. Like a “new believers class” offered by a church today, the Gospels provided summaries of Jesus’ life and teaching. Scholars sometimes distinguish between the kerygma —the essential “preaching” of the message of salvation—and the didache —the “teaching” of the Gospel traditions about Jesus. Liturgical: The need for worship material in the church . The Hebrew Scriptures (the Old Testament) were read in the synagogues, but for Christians, this was only half the story. The promise had to be supplemented with the fulfillment. Some scholars have argued that the Gospels were written to provide a Christian liturgy. Exhortatory: To encourage and assure believers in their faith . As a small and persecuted minority, the early believers needed reassurance of the truth and reliability of the story of Jesus. Theological: The need to settle internal disputes . From time to time, false teaching arose in the church. The Gospels may have been written in part to counter false teaching about Jesus or to combat an alternate religious worldview like Gnosticism . Apologetic: The need to respond to external attacks on the church . The church was under attack from its enemies, and the Gospels may have been written in part to respond to these attacks. Matthew’s Gospel appears to be responding to accusations made by the Jewish community against Jesus’ messiahship and against the Jewish-Christian church. Evangelistic : The need to call people to faith in Jesus . While the Gospels were written primarily to believers, all of them contain an implicit call to faith in Jesus Christ. John’s Gospel cites this as one of its purposes (20:31).0
  • Why might it be a problem to have four gospels? What si teh advantage of having four gospels? That there are four gospels standing side by side in the canon, none of which has been subordinated to another, is an invitation to recognize that teh truth about Jesus to which the gospels bear witness is irreducibly plural without being either incoherent or completely elastic. The fourfold gospel points to the profundity of Jeuss’ impact on his followers, the inexhaustibility of the truth about him, and the way in which knowldge of Jesus is necessarily self evolving’ Barton. Many GHsopels one Jesus in Cambridge Comapnion to Jesus, 170

What is the Gospel? What are the Gospels? What is the Gospel? What are the Gospels? Presentation Transcript

  • Introducing the Synoptic GospelsCOURSE TH4903 Rev. Jon SwalesDATE JAN 2013 LOCATION WTC RESIDENTIAL
  • AIMS 1. To introduce students to a systematic critical study of Jesus and the gospels in their ancient literary, theological and historical context payingparticular attention to the way in which the meaning of NT texts is determined by to the challengesC1st 2. To sensitize students OT tradition and and problems presentedJudaism. by an historical study of thegospels; their principal themes, interpretative puzzles and the theological issues they raise. 3. 2.ToTo sensitize students to the challenges textual provide students with foundational NT and problems presented a the formation of a biblical resources towards by an historical study of thegospels; theirwhich impacts discipleship, ministry, theology principal themes, interpretative puzzlesleadership, mission and Christian they raise. in the and the theological issues engagement public square. 3. To provide students with foundational NT textual resources towards a the formation of a biblical theology which impacts discipleship, ministry,leadership, mission and Christian engagement in the
  • HOW DO DO WELL IN THIS MODULE•Read the Synoptics•Keep up with course reading•Read the Synoptics•Ask questions•Active engagement in lectures.•Begin thinking about Essays soonerrather than later•Read good secondary literature•Refer to primary source material•PrayIntroducing the Synoptic Gospels
  • QuickTime™ and a decompressorare needed to see this picture.
  • WHAT IS THE GOSPEL? •Sin Management •4 Spiritual Laws •Bridge Diagram •Conversion Process •Justification by Faith•Rhetorical Package•Personal Salvation •Do we need Matthew, Mark, Luke & John?
  • WHAT IS THE GOSPEL?Gk: euangellion (noun)Gk: euangelizomai (Verbal Cognate: gospelize, preach/bring goodnews) Matthew 24:14 (ESV) 14 And this gospel of the kingdom will be proclaimed throughout the whole world as a testimony to all nations, and then the end will come. Acts 15:7 (ESV) 7 And after there had been much debate, Peter stood up and said to them, “Brothers, you know that in the early days God made a choice among you, that by my mouth the Gentiles should hear the word of the gospel and believe.
  • WHAT IS THE GOSPEL? Romans 1:16 (ESV) 16 For I am not ashamed of the gospel, for it is the power of God for salvation to everyone who believes, to the Jew first and also to the Greek. Galatians 1:6–9 (ESV) 6 I am astonished that you are so quickly deserting him whocalled you in the grace of Christ and are turning to a differentgospel— 7 not that there is another one, but there are somewho trouble you and want to distort the gospel of Christ. 8 But even if we or an angel from heaven should preach to you a gospel contrary to the one we preached to you, let him be accursed. 9 As we have said before, so now I say again: Ifanyone is preaching to you a gospel contrary to the one you received, let him be accursed.
  • PRIENE INSCRIPTIONIt seemed good to the Greeks of Asia, in the opinion of the high priestApollonius of Menophilus Azanitus: Since providence, which has ordered allthings and is deeply interested in our life, has set in most perfect order bygiving us Augustus, whom she filled with virtue that he might benefithumankind, sending him as a savior, both for us and for our descendants, thathe might end war and arrange all things, and since he, Caesar, by hisappearance excelled even our anticipations, surpassing all previousbenefactors, and not even leaving to posterity any hope of surpassing what hehas done, and since the birthday of the god Augustus was the beginning ofthe good tidings for the world that came by reason of him, which Asiaresolved in Smyrna.
  • 1 Corinthians 15:1–8 (ESV)1 Now I would remind you, brothers, of the gospel I preached to you, which you received, in which you stand, 2 and by which you are being saved, if you hold fast to the word I preached to you—unless you believed in vain. 3 For I delivered to you as of first importance what I also received: that Christ died for our sins in accordance with the Scriptures, 4 that he was buried, that he was raised on the third day in accordance with the Scriptures, 5 and that he appeared to Cephas, then to thetwelve. 6 Then he appeared to more than five hundred brothers at one time, most of whom are still alive, though some have fallen asleep. 7 Then he appeared to James, then to all the apostles. 8 Last of all, as to one untimely born, he appeared also to me. Last of all, as to one untimely born, he appeared also to me. Last of all, as to one untimely born, he appeared also to me.
  • Romans 1:1–6 (ESV)1 Paul, a servant of Christ Jesus, called to be an apostle, setapart for the gospel of God, 2 which he promised beforehandthrough his prophets in the holy Scriptures, 3 concerning hisSon, who was descended from David according to the flesh 4and was declared to be the Son of God in power according tothe Spirit of holiness by his resurrection from the dead, JesusChrist our Lord, 5 through whom we have received grace andapostleship to bring about the obedience of faith for the sakeof his name among all the nations, 6 including you who arecalled to belong to Jesus Christ,
  • APOSTOLIC PREACHING(1) Acts 2:14-39(2) Acts 3:12-26(3) Acts 4:8-12(4) Acts 5:29-32(5) Acts 10:34-43(6) Acts 13:16-42(7) Acts 17:22-31
  • 1.The story of Israel is the story of God in the world, and Israel’s story finds its completion in Jesus.2.The story of Jesus brings Israel’s story to its completion.3.Christ died “for our sins”4.Jesus is the Messiah, King of God’s kingdom, Saviour, Son of God and Lord.
  • Four Gospels, One Jesus UNITY AND DIVERSITY
  • Structure of Matthew 5 Blocks of Teaching 1. The Sermon on the Mount (5:1‑7:28) 2. The Missionary Discourse (10:1‑42) 3. The Parable Discourse (13:1‑53) 4. The Community Discourse (17:22‑18:35) 5. The Apocalyptic Discourse (24:1‑25:46) Structural Markers“when Jesus finished saying these things…” (7:28, 11:1, 13:53, 19:1, 26:1).
  • Four Gospels One Jesus UNITY AND DIVERSITY
  • Four Gospels One Jesus UNITY AND DIVERSITY
  • Luke refers to thirteen women not mentioned elsewhere in theGospels.•Birth Narratives: Mary, Elizabeth, and Anna.•The widow of Nain (7:12–15),•The woman who anointed Jesus’ feet (7:36–50), the women whosupported Jesus (8:1–3),•The woman with a blood disease (8:43–48),•Mary and Martha (10:38–42),•the “daughter of Abraham” (13:10–17),• the poor widow (21:1–4),•the “daughters of Jerusalem” who lament Jesus (23:27–31), thosewho watched the crucifixion (23:49),•those who report the resurrection (23:55–24:11).
  • Four Gospels One Jesus UNITY AND DIVERSITY
  • Synoptics (ViewTogether)
  • What is the genre of the gospels?Richard A. Burridge, What Are The Gospels?, page 218(emphasis his):Thus, there is a high degree of correlation between thegeneric features of Graeco-Roman βίοι and those of thesynoptic gospels; in fact, they exhibit more of the featuresthan are shown by works at the edges of the genre, such asthose of Isocrates, Xenophon, and Philostratus. This is surelya sufficient number of shared features for the genre of thesynoptic gospels to be clear: while they may well form theirown subgenre because of their shared content, thesynoptic gospels belong within the overal genre ofβίοι.
  • What is the genre of the gospels?‘Our canonical gospels are the theological, historical, and artological(virtue-forming’ biographical narratives that retell the story andproclaim the significance of Jesus Christ, who through the power of theSpirit is the Restorer of God’s reign’ Pennington‘In summary, we can classify the Gospels as historical narrativemotivated by theological concerns. Their intention is not only to conveyaccurate historical material about Jesus but also to explain andinterpret these salvation-bringing events. The Gospels were written notby detached uninterested observers but by Evangelists, ‘proclaimers ofgood news,’ announcing the good news of Jesus CHrist and callingpeople to faith in him’ Strauss
  • Why were the Gospels Written? •Historical •Catechetical •Liturgical •Exhortatory •Theological •Apologetic •Evangelistic
  • Why do weneed fourGospels?