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Introduction to Research (wk 3)
 

Introduction to Research (wk 3)

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The week 3 presentation for Introduction to Research, a Lit Review class. Simply an introduction to reading, interpreting and then being able to communicate professional and academic research by ...

The week 3 presentation for Introduction to Research, a Lit Review class. Simply an introduction to reading, interpreting and then being able to communicate professional and academic research by others.

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  • The purpose of this class is for you to improve your skills at finding, interpreting and communicating the professional and academic ideas and research of others. We are all connected and build upon the findings of others to create our own interconnected competences.
  • As we discussed in week 1, Human knowledge doubles every two years (most subjects). Your ability to discern what is good and usable, as well as communicate what you’ve learned to others is a foundation of your ability to succeed. It’s also important to understand that there may be slightly competing concepts that each have validity, particularly in the social sciences, depending on the individual or group cultures. What works for Teri is not necessarily what works for LeAnne and doesn’t have to be.
  • 40+ minute round table discussion of all students after two weeks of seeking to increase interpersonal comfort, collaboration and assess progress.
  • There have been a couple of changes to Ecollege: Webliography and a student Pdf's folder under Doc Sharing (show both). In the week 3 section there is a 10 minute video on writing a literature from YouTube (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t2d7y_r65HU) and the link is also included here. I’m hopeful that you’ve done enough database searching so far that Reading Response 2 will be a fairly quick exercise. Question: Why is what you say, how you say it and what you share with each other important? Student response: Simply because it demonstrates your ability to communicate sometimes complex information in your own words, professionally, with proper spelling and grammar. How you communicate here is another competence with ties to organizational email, memos, and creating corporate reports. That’s why it’s graded, though not at a level high enough to dramatically effect your grade. I’ve left Dr. Cichy’s (chicky) presentation (Funnel) up because it may be of more use to you than mine and gives you another look at the information. She created the coursepacks, but remember I’ve asked you to read those a week ahead of time in our syllabus so you can ask questions and I can prepare for our in class time. And finally there is a place for you to upload your APA formatted resources page as well as paste it into a Discussion Thread. You do need to look at and make minor comments about what you see. You do not need to download anyone else’s pages. I will make any needed comments and upload it back to you. With permission we’re going to look at Barbara’s post later on.
  • Math for many of us can make our heads explode just looking at the numbers. Yet, math is inescapable in our personal and professional lives, and we have to learn to at some basic level, how to understand, read and interpret the validity of numbers which can be manipulated. This isn’t a higher level statistics class, but there are real world implications to our being able to comprehend why math is important. If you’ve never visited www.ted.com, you should. This talk is from Kevin Slavin.
  • Straightforward explanation, with the note for Median that if there is an even number of entries, the total number of entries is divided by 2 which provides a result. The Median with an odd number of entries is the next highest entry from that result.
  • Measure of Dispersion and Range both describe the distance (spread) among the set of numbers in a report.
  • Standard deviation is commonly used to measure confidence in statistical conclusions. For example, the margin of error in polling data is determined by calculating the expected standard deviation in the results if the same poll were to be conducted multiple times. (Typically the reported margin of error is about twice the standard deviation, the radius of a 95% confidence interval.) In science, researchers commonly report the standard deviation of experimental data, and only effects that fall far outside the range of standard deviation are considered statistically significant. Standard deviation is also important in finance, where the standard deviation on the rate of return on an investment is a measure of the risk.
  • Standard deviation is commonly used to measure confidence in statistical conclusions. For example, the margin of error in polling data is determined by calculating the expected standard deviation in the results if the same poll were to be conducted multiple times. (Typically the reported margin of error is about twice the standard deviation, the radius of a 95% confidence interval.) In science, researchers commonly report the standard deviation of experimental data, and only effects that fall far outside the range of standard deviation are considered statistically significant. Standard deviation is also important in finance, where the standard deviation on the rate of return on an investment is a measure of the risk. http://www.childrensmercy.org/stats/definitions/stdev.htm http://www.robertniles.com/stats/stdev.shtml
  • During the break have conversations with each other about partnering for peer review based on logical collaborations. There will be one group of 3 (11 students). Decisions to be finished by the end of the night.
  • You’ll notice at the top of this sample “running head”. The term “running head” only appears on the first page, after that the title and the page number are on every page. Within MS Word Header/Footer you’ll simply need to check the box that says “different first page”. Resources as a “title” is centered, but not all topic headings are. After that the citations are alphabetical with a ½ inch reverse indent. Barbara was kind of us to let her use her post for this week as a sample so let’s look at the version I uploaded with the MS Review Function in the threaded discussion.
  • Funneling is the concept of taking a huge amount literature – chunking into a small/important focus – evaluating it with a critical eye. Successful focus/evaluation leads to discovery, not frustration. It is also a continual loop in that the better you become at it, the more adaptable you become to organizational, environment, cultural and global change because you can in a relatively short period of time acquire the knowledge you need to act, even if you’re not in a structured class.
  • Where does your topic belong (leadership, health care, psychology, etc.) Why should you care about this topic? How many people are impacted by this? How much money is being spent and/or wasted on this? How often does it occur?
  • Remember that research must be significant, relevant, and original to both the author or author (s) and to the reader. Funneling is about focusing the lens. Some of your declared topics are rather broad, which is fine as long as you’re aware of it. Others, like Russell’s are extremely specific, and readily applicable to his responsibilities for Lakeland. So his research will not only increase his competences, it should result in higher performance within his current organization, with opportunities for further growth.
  • Dr. Cichy’s slide mentions this research, which I was able to find just by typing Meyer & Rowan in about thirty seconds. It has been listed as a resource in over 11,000 other published articles (up from the 3500 listed in her slide). It is highly important, foundational and clearly led to mountains of other research. If that many published articles have used it, you know it’s valid, safe and worth paying attention to. It’s also been uploaded into Doc Sharing already, so don’t look for it. It may be useful for those of you taking Culture though if you’re reading Schein.
  • Self Explanatory
  • Self Explanatory
  • Repeating what was discussed in the first week.
  • Remember that this curriculum was created for both 602 (non thesis) and 605 (thesis). If you find over the course of your literature review that there is an opportunity for you to do a Master’s thesis, as one of us already has, that discussion can be had with Dr. Cichy and Dr. Hooghart and your advisor so that as you progress you have the proper academic supervision.
  • Don’t follow this path.
  • Questions? The library’s still open tonight.

Introduction to Research (wk 3) Introduction to Research (wk 3) Presentation Transcript

  • Narrowing Your Focus GRS 602 – Siena Heights @ Lake Michigan College
  • Thomas Jefferson
    • He who receives an idea from me, receives instruction himself without lessening mine; as he who lights his taper at mine, receives light without darkening me.
    • That ideas should freely spread from one to another over the globe, for the moral and mutual instruction of man, and improvement of his condition, seems to have been peculiarly and benevolently designed by nature, when she made them, like fire, expansible over all space, without lessening their density in any point, and like the air in which we breathe, move, and have our physical being, incapable of confinement or exclusive appropriation. (1854, pp. 180-181)
  •  
  • What Have You Discovered? And how does it apply to your life?
  • Where Are We Timeline My Siena Writing a Literature Review (YouTube)
  • How Math Shapes Our World Ted Talks: Kevin Slavin
  • Statistics Basics
    • MEAN: The average of the set.
    • MEDIAN: The center of the set.
    • MODE: The number that occurs most often in the group.
    • MEAN: 100/16 = 6.25
    • MEDIAN: 7
    • MODE: 7 (occurs 5x)
    2 5 6 7 7 4 1 9 8 7 9 6 5 7 7 10
  • Statistics Basics
    • Measure of Dispersion – a number that describes how the numbers of a set of data are spread out or dispersed.
    • Range – The difference between the two extreme values (highest and lowest) in a group of values or a set of data.
    Range = Highest value – Lowest value Find the range of the following values: 83.6, 77.3, 69.2, 93.1, 85.4, 71.6 Range = 93.1 – 69.2 = 23.9
  • Standard Deviation Standard deviation tells us the strength (confidence) of the data. Step 1. Find the mean of the set of data Step 2. Compute the deviation by subtracting the mean from each value Step 3. Square each deviation Step 4. Add up the squared deviations Step 5. Divide by one less than the sample size Step 6. Find the square root (√ ) of the number obtained in Step 5. This is the standard deviation
  • Standard Deviation
    • How spread out is the data? (SD1, SD2, SD3 bell curves to the right).
    • In science, researchers commonly report the standard deviation of experimental data, and only effects that fall far outside the range of standard deviation are considered statistically significant (95% falls within an SD of 3).
    http://www.childrensmercy.org/stats/definitions/stdev.htm http://www.robertniles.com/stats/stdev.shtml
  • Don’t Get Lost in the Math!
  • Break – Who is Your Peer? Classmate Topic Conflict Resolution from Female Perspective Educational Leadership Engagement, Trust and Leader Effectiveness Health Care Gender Leadership Health Care Real Time Location Systems Hospitality Leadership Leadership Serving Elderly Populations Pre-Adolescent Health Preferential Leadership? Rural Health Care The Impact of the Electronic Health Record.
  • APA Resources Style Image Source: http://0.tqn.com/d/psychology/1/0/m/8/references2.jpg My Siena
  • Funneling
  • Funneling Your Search & Writing
  • Funneling = > Focusing Your Lens
  • Important Literature
    • Institutionalized Organizations: Formal Structure as Myth and Ceremony
    • glennschool.osu.edu/faculty/brown/home/.../ Meyer 1977.pdf
    • File Format: PDF/Adobe Acrobat - Quick View by JW Meyer - 1977 - Cited by 11511 - Related articles
    Google (not even Google Scholar)
  • The Lit Review Journey It’s not a race among each of you because the only prize for finishing first is being done.
  • The Lit Review Journey It’s a five week marathon to go from broad and unfocused to a specific personal understanding that you can apply as well as share with others. It’s a skill you will use again and again the rest of your life.
  • The Lit Review Journey
    • 3 Books
    • 10-15 Academic journal articles
    • Read selectively and wisely
      • Write a summary paragraph immediately
    • Why? Why? Why?
    • Applies to me how?
    • Focus, Focus, Focus
  • The Lit Review Journey
    • There is no hypothesis now, because you’re not conducting an experiment.
    • If you have an “aha” moment, share it with the rest of us.
    • Make decisions, and ask for help. Don’t wait.
    • A teaspoon of sugar
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