Introduction to Research, Week 1
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  • Quote from Professor Wallace’s Master’s Thesis.
  • Exercise done in class with data uploaded immediately for top two categories and a graph created. Students will then be given 20 minutes (max) to describe what the graph tells them.
  • Discussion
  • Discussion
  • Hyperlink to RSA Animate graphic of Pink speaking on YouTube.
  • Quote from the book.
  • At a 2011 presentation at the ODF, another Dr. requested that Professor Wallace used the 4 I’s of Transformational leadership in the PowerPoint. Professor Wallace argued that academia doesn’t speak in the same terms that business owners/entrepreneurs do, and so the terms were changed to reflect the above.
  • Author and leader Margaret Wheatley in “Crucial Conversations) lays out guidelines with which we will base this class for the rest of the term.
  • Human knowledge (on average) doubles every five years (depending on the specific field). How do we tell good information from bad information?
  • Example: Your company makes dog food and you want to develop the highest, most cost effective dog food. How would you approach this experimentally?
  • Example: Could a math teacher predict which sorts of students are likely to have trouble learning algebra? [Collect data on students’ computational skills, ability to solve word problems, math concept understanding, study habits, early experiences with math courses and math teachers, #s and kinds of math courses taken, etc.]
  • Example: A manufacturer wants to find out how consumers in a different market would react to their products if introduced there.
  • If you don’t work in children’s health care or child psychology, then a paper on childhood obesity or children’s behavior and television violence has no relevance. You’re in a leadership degree field your understanding of trends for leading a team in your industry or that gives you a knowledge advantage over a competitor (be that employee or separate organization) is what you should desire.
  • Remember Gardner? How can you improve your mental discipline to synthesize volumes of data in a creative way that is respectful of others and ethically sound?
  • Quote from the book.
  • Remember Gardner? How can you improve your mental discipline to synthesize volumes of data in a creative way that is respectful of others and ethically sound?
  • We’ll conclude this class brainstorming topics and doing online research.

Introduction to Research, Week 1 Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Introduction to Research GRS 602 LDR - Wallace
  • 2. Not as it is, but as it could be . . .• Leadership never occurs in a vacuum. Organizational culture change improving results and profitability require engaged followers whose hearts have been moved by a vision communicated and demonstrated by those in power. (Deal, 1982; Avolio 1999; Senge, Kleiner, Roberts, Ross, & Smith, 1994; Kouzes & Posner, 2007).
  • 3. Buckets - not individually rankedGardner, H., Csikszentmihalyi, M., & Damon, W. (2001). Good work, when excellence and ethics meet. New York, NY: Basic Books.
  • 4. Buckets - not individually ranked Insert graph after class exercise for individual writing analysis followed by group discussion.Gardner, H., Csikszentmihalyi, M., & Damon, W. (2001). Good work, when excellence and ethics meet. New York, NY: Basic Books.
  • 5. Why are you here?
  • 6. Why are you here?• Because you have a vision (clear or cloudy) of greatness beyond who you are today.• Because you want to compete in a global marketplace, whether your business/organizational level ever extends beyond this region.• Because you believe you can have a positive impact.
  • 7. Daniel Pink - Drive
  • 8. Five Minds for the Future (Gardner)• Disciplined Mind• Synthesizing Mind• Creative Mind• Respectful Mind• Ethical Mind
  • 9. Academia vs. Reality Full Range of Leadership
  • 10. Transformational Leadership (4 I’s) • Intellectual Stimulation • Individualized Consideration • Inspirational Motivation • Idealized Influence (Attributes and Behavior)
  • 11. Margaret Wheatley
  • 12. BreakSource
  • 13. Information Overload
  • 14. The Scientific Method
  • 15. Scientific Research• Must always be able to be replicated by others (open and public as possible).• Today more than ever a global perspective is needed for local application.• In research, results often lead to new questions. – This cycle = dynamic, growing body of knowledge in a field or discipline
  • 16. Types of Research• Experimental – The researcher(s) establishes treatments and then studies their effects – Leads to the most clear-cut interpretations – Control group and experimental group – Only change one (1) variable at a time
  • 17. Types of Research Qualitative Quantitative• Generates non-numerical • Generates numerical data or data. It focuses on gathering information that can be of mainly verbal data rather converted to numbers than measurements. • Creates statistical models Gathered information is then analyzed in an interpretative manner, subjective, impressionistic or even diagnostic ways.
  • 18. Types of Research• Ethnographic – Is an emphasis on documenting or portraying the everyday experiences of individuals by observing and interviewing them and relevant others – Qualitative: grounded in the assumption that individuals construct social reality in the form of meanings and interpretations, and that these constructions tend to be transitory and situational. – Includes historical research, biography, phenomenology (focus on a particular phenomenon like Board conflict), case studies.
  • 19. Types of Research• Correlational - Determining relationships among two (2) or more variables and explore implications for cause and effect. – Helps us make more intelligent predictions – Requires no manipulation or intervention by researcher other than administering an instrument to collect data – Usually used when looking for and describing relationships among naturally occurring phenomena
  • 20. Types of Research • Survey Research - Obtains data to determine specific characteristics of a group. – Written questionnaire (MLQ, LPI, Zoomerang, Survey Monkey, etc.) – Interviews & Focus Groups – Closed and open-ended questions
  • 21. Types of Research• Action Research - Conducted by one or more individuals or groups for the purpose of solving a problem or obtaining information in order to inform local practice – Generalization to other persons/settings/situations not important – Active involvement of participants or stakeholders; levels of engagement can vary
  • 22. Types of Research • Evaluation Research - Makes judgments about the quality of particular programs, procedures, materials, etc. – Data collected then compared against a set of criteria used to indicate qualityhttp://www2.bakersfieldcollege.edu/assessment/CLIPs/EvalResearchMethods.htm
  • 23. Systematic Reviews, Meta-Analysis,and Research Synthesis• Involves searching the literature, assembling studies for review, coding and combining studies, and interpreting and reporting the results. The rationale behind using this approach is that examining many related, well-conducted studies is more productive than relying on a single study.• This is your focus for this class.
  • 24. Your Research• The syllabus• A meta-analysis/literature review topic that is both passionate for you and has implications for your career and life.• Wikipedia is not a source (Dept of Labor).• Siena Heights Databases• MEL - Academic OneFile• http://scholar.google.com/
  • 25. Words to GraphicsCan you synthesize your research intoan easy understandable graphic?
  • 26. Five Minds for the Future (Gardner)• Disciplined Mind• Synthesizing Mind• Creative Mind• Respectful Mind• Ethical Mind
  • 27. Words to GraphicsCan you synthesize your research intoan easy understandable graphic?
  • 28. I have not failed . . .I’ve just found a thousandways that didn’t work.Thomas Alva Edison