A Scientist in Your Event Fundraising Department:Segmenting messagesCustomizing contentDelivering results
© Event 360 | Page 2
Why Am I Here? OBJECTIVE:   Strengthen your effectiveness in your event fundraising    communications OUTCOME:   A few...
© Event 360 | Page 4
© Event 360 | Page 5
© Event 360 | Page 6
Situation Problem: How do I use online communications effectively to  increase my event fundraising? Hypothesis: Persona...
PROBLEM:How do I utilize onlinecommunications to generate realevent fundraising results?              © Event 360 | Page 8
© Event 360 | Page 9
The first rule of fundraising is to ASK.                  © Event 360 | Page 10
Long-time major donor,                                Participated in a different  milestone birthday approaching.        ...
HYPOTHESIS:Personalizing eventcommunications strategies andtactics through segmentation willincrease your fundraising resu...
What is segmentation?                                       Understand what makes                                        ...
What happens if I don’t segment? Oversaturate people  with information. Hit or miss on your  messaging = no  constituent...
What happens if I do segment?                                    Right message to the                                    ...
PROCEDURE:Identify groups within your eventaudience with uniquecharacteristics and talk to thembased on what motivates the...
Step 1: Collecting Data Keep it simple, start with WHY.   What’s your connection to the cause?   Why did you choose to ...
Case Study:Komen Global Race for the Cure, Year One Existing database was inconsistent. Added a question to registration...
Step 2: Descriptive Analysis Focus on donor  characteristics. Evaluate what they have  done in the past. Segment based ...
Case Study: Komen Global Race for the Cure Went beyond the standard split of fundraisers versus non-fundraisers. Discove...
Case Study: PetSmart Charities PetWalk                      © Event 360 | Page 21
Step 3: Predictive Analysis                                      Use your constituent                                    ...
Case Study:Komen Global Race for the Cure, Year Two At registration asked:   “Do you plan on fundraising?”   “Are you i...
Step 4: Building Strong Messaging                                     Build a clear case for                             ...
Step 4: Lessons on Messaging Make a specific ask. Be simple and concise – attention  spans are short.   o Mission always...
Case Study: Susan G. Komen 3-Day for the Cure                                                              Acknowledgement...
RESULTS:More meaningful connections withyour event participants and moremoney raised for your mission.             © Event...
How do you measure results? Evaluate click-through and open rates.  o Compare to number of gifts and actions taken (e.g. ...
Case Study: Komen Global Race for the Cure   Fundraising average per registrant up 10 %   Fundraising average per fundra...
Case Study: Komen Global Race for the Cure Interest in fundraising rewards was a key indicator. Affirmative answer to “a...
Case Study: Komen Global Race for the Cure Messages about incentives were the most engaging. Tested messages using incen...
CONCLUSION:  You have a diverse group of event participants.      Long-time major donor,                                Pa...
CONCLUSION:Using your data to segment your messages will bring themtogether to raise more money for your cause.           ...
READY FOR RESULTS? Come and chat with us.                www.event360.com/RWR2011 Download slides from today’s presentat...
© Event 360 | Page 35
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A Scientist in Your Event Fundraising Department

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Presented at the 2011 Run Walk Ride Fundraising Conference in Atlanta, Georgia.

Sure, you have a plan for communicating with your constituents online, but are you doing it in the most analytical way possible? Different people respond to different messages in different ways, based on their affinity to your cause and their past or current behaviors. This session will share lessons learned from segmenting online communications for some of the largest fundraising events in the country. From identifying audience segments, to targeting communications, to tracking the final results of each campaign, this session will feature strategies for increasing your marketing and fundraising results through more targeted online communication.


This session will be targeted to organizations who are already utilizing basic e-mail communications methods with their constituent populations. We will give you strategies and tactics to take your communications to the next level.


Session Takeaways:

1) How to segment with descriptive analysis

2) How to target with predictive analysis

3) How to analyze the impact of your segmentation & targeting strategy

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A Scientist in Your Event Fundraising Department

  1. 1. A Scientist in Your Event Fundraising Department:Segmenting messagesCustomizing contentDelivering results
  2. 2. © Event 360 | Page 2
  3. 3. Why Am I Here? OBJECTIVE:  Strengthen your effectiveness in your event fundraising communications OUTCOME:  A few good ideas to test when you get back to the office  A business case for data-driven event communications AGENDA:  How to segment with descriptive analysis  How to target with predictive analysis  How to analyze the impact of your segmentation & targeting strategy DOES THIS WORK? © Event 360 | Page 3
  4. 4. © Event 360 | Page 4
  5. 5. © Event 360 | Page 5
  6. 6. © Event 360 | Page 6
  7. 7. Situation Problem: How do I use online communications effectively to increase my event fundraising? Hypothesis: Personalizing event communications through segmentation will generate results. Procedure: Identify groups within your event audience with unique characteristics and talk to them based on what motivates them. Results: More meaningful connections with your event participants and more money raised for your mission. © Event 360 | Page 7
  8. 8. PROBLEM:How do I utilize onlinecommunications to generate realevent fundraising results? © Event 360 | Page 8
  9. 9. © Event 360 | Page 9
  10. 10. The first rule of fundraising is to ASK. © Event 360 | Page 10
  11. 11. Long-time major donor, Participated in a different milestone birthday approaching. event with siblings, lives with parents at home.Team captain for top Board Member, fundraising team, married, no kids. thinking about retirement.New volunteer with your Directly affected by your organization, parent. cause, city-dweller. “Likes” you on Facebook Lapsed participant, but because a friend consistent donor. participated in an event, lives abroad. The key is to ask in a PERSONAL way. © Event 360 | Page 11
  12. 12. HYPOTHESIS:Personalizing eventcommunications strategies andtactics through segmentation willincrease your fundraising results. © Event 360 | Page 12
  13. 13. What is segmentation?  Understand what makes your constituents tick. o Group them together based on similar characteristics. o Identify your highest potential groups. o Forecast future behavior based on information.  Speak to each group differently. © Event 360 | Page 13
  14. 14. What happens if I don’t segment? Oversaturate people with information. Hit or miss on your messaging = no constituent action. Lose the opportunity to build a meaningful connection. © Event 360 | Page 14
  15. 15. What happens if I do segment?  Right message to the right person at the right time.  Create a connection and generate a response.  Deepen relationships with people who care about your mission. © Event 360 | Page 15
  16. 16. PROCEDURE:Identify groups within your eventaudience with uniquecharacteristics and talk to thembased on what motivates them. © Event 360 | Page 16
  17. 17. Step 1: Collecting Data Keep it simple, start with WHY.  What’s your connection to the cause?  Why did you choose to donate? Use the donor information you already have:  Address information  Gift history (how much, how many, to what projects)  Gender, birthdate (age) Group based on basic information, identify trends and adjust communications based on trends. Work towards standardizing your process, your questions and your data entry to make measurement and evaluation easier. © Event 360 | Page 17
  18. 18. Case Study:Komen Global Race for the Cure, Year One Existing database was inconsistent. Added a question to registration form: “What is your connection to the cause?” Focused on building our understanding of who was actually coming and why, instead of deciding we already knew. © Event 360 | Page 18
  19. 19. Step 2: Descriptive Analysis Focus on donor characteristics. Evaluate what they have done in the past. Segment based on characteristics and past activity. © Event 360 | Page 19
  20. 20. Case Study: Komen Global Race for the Cure Went beyond the standard split of fundraisers versus non-fundraisers. Discovered clustering of fundraising around specific levels. o Allowed for tiered segmentation below this fundraising level and above this level (high potential fundraisers). o Tailored communication to each of these audiences’ fundraising behaviors and motivations. Combined cause connection information with the amount actually raised to create blended messages that spoke to very specific situations. Don’t forget donors!  Created targeted asks based on the previous year’s average donation (social norms) to encourage donors to give more. © Event 360 | Page 20
  21. 21. Case Study: PetSmart Charities PetWalk © Event 360 | Page 21
  22. 22. Step 3: Predictive Analysis  Use your constituent knowledge and information about past activities as indicators of potential future activity.  Identify a predisposition towards a specific action, give them messaging and tools to get there faster. © Event 360 | Page 22
  23. 23. Case Study:Komen Global Race for the Cure, Year Two At registration asked:  “Do you plan on fundraising?”  “Are you interested in incentives?” From 2009, knew that “Yes, I plan on fundraising” was an indicator of someone who would be a good fundraiser.  Combined with an interest in incentives, this was a predictor of a strong fundraiser. Received different messaging based on what we expected them to do, versus what they had already done. © Event 360 | Page 23
  24. 24. Step 4: Building Strong Messaging  Build a clear case for your event.  NEED: What problem are you trying to solve?  IMPACT: What difference will you be making? © Event 360 | Page 24
  25. 25. Step 4: Lessons on Messaging Make a specific ask. Be simple and concise – attention spans are short. o Mission always front and center. o Demonstrate a donation’s impact. In peer-to-peer event fundraising: o Relationship with the participant is the donation driver. o Strong case for your mission at time of donation may increase the donation amount. o Follow-up donor messaging is equally important, use the opportunity to educate. Say THANK YOU. © Event 360 | Page 25
  26. 26. Case Study: Susan G. Komen 3-Day for the Cure Acknowledgement of past participation. Specific, realistic ask that is tied to event. © Event 360 | Page 26
  27. 27. RESULTS:More meaningful connections withyour event participants and moremoney raised for your mission. © Event 360 | Page 27
  28. 28. How do you measure results? Evaluate click-through and open rates. o Compare to number of gifts and actions taken (e.g. event registration). After your event or campaign is complete, review the median gift size. o If the asks are more powerful through segmentation, there will be a rise in the median gift size. o Begin with measuring against year-ago to ensure change. Results provide important data for you to make adjustments and changes for campaigns in following years. o Make note of trends and adjust your strategies accordingly. © Event 360 | Page 28
  29. 29. Case Study: Komen Global Race for the Cure Fundraising average per registrant up 10 % Fundraising average per fundraiser up 16% Median fundraising per fundraiser up 20%, from $100 to $120 Median donation up 20%, from $50 to $60 Event raised more money through fewer participants. 70 270 65 250 60 230 55 210 50 190 45 170 40 150 2009 2010 2009 2010 Average per Registrant Average per Fundraiser © Event 360 | Page 29
  30. 30. Case Study: Komen Global Race for the Cure Interest in fundraising rewards was a key indicator. Affirmative answer to “are you interested in earning rewards” second largest indicator of fundraising potential. In some cases, the group who answers “yes” is twice as likely to fundraise as those who answer “no.” 10% yes 21% maybe no 69% © Event 360 | Page 30
  31. 31. Case Study: Komen Global Race for the Cure Messages about incentives were the most engaging. Tested messages using incentives, stats, stories and tools as motivators. 50% Incentives 40% Stats 30% Stories 20% Tools 10% 0% Open Rate Click Forward Through Rate Rate © Event 360 | Page 31
  32. 32. CONCLUSION: You have a diverse group of event participants. Long-time major donor, Participated in a different milestone birthday approaching. event with siblings, lives with parents at home.Team captain for top fundraising team, Board Member, thinking about married, no kids. retirement.New volunteer with your Directly affected by your organization, parent. cause, city-dweller. “Likes” you on Facebook Lapsed participant, but because a friend consistent donor. participated in an event, lives abroad. © Event 360 | Page 32
  33. 33. CONCLUSION:Using your data to segment your messages will bring themtogether to raise more money for your cause. WE CARE ABOUT YOUR CAUSE. © Event 360 | Page 33
  34. 34. READY FOR RESULTS? Come and chat with us. www.event360.com/RWR2011 Download slides from today’s presentation. Sign up for a complimentary session with our fundraising consultants. © Event 360 | Page 34
  35. 35. © Event 360 | Page 35

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