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Women's rights
Women's rights
Women's rights
Women's rights
Women's rights
Women's rights
Women's rights
Women's rights
Women's rights
Women's rights
Women's rights
Women's rights
Women's rights
Women's rights
Women's rights
Women's rights
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Women's rights

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  • 1. Ali Jonny Katie Mitch
  • 2. Rights <ul><li>1848 - Women’s Rights Convention was founded by Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Lucretia Mott, Martha Wright, Mary Ann M’Clintock and Jane Hunt </li></ul><ul><li>Group was designed to promote women’s rights </li></ul><ul><li>The Convention gave women more rights in the office, school, community, and government. </li></ul>
  • 3. Education <ul><li>The 1800’s brought the most changes to Women’s education </li></ul><ul><li>Secondary schools became an option for women - The Young Ladies Academy </li></ul><ul><li>At the time they studied the same subjects as men did </li></ul><ul><li>The number of women who attended the school increased dramatically because of the want for an education. </li></ul>
  • 4. Social
  • 5. Legal History of Women Early 1800’s <ul><li>1777 All states pass laws which take away women ユ s right to vote. </li></ul><ul><li>1789 United States Constitution ratified. The terms “ p ersons, ” “ p eople ” and “ e lectors ” are used, allowing the interpretation of those beings to include men and women. </li></ul><ul><li>1839 The first state (Mississippi) grants women the right to hold property in their own name, with their husbands ’ permission. </li></ul><ul><li>1848 At Seneca Falls, New York, 300 women and men sign the Declaration of Sentiments, a plea for the end of discrimination against women in all spheres of society. </li></ul>
  • 6. Legal History of Women Late 1800’s <ul><li>1869 The first woman suffrage law in the U.S. is passed in the territory of Wyoming. </li></ul><ul><li>1873 Bradwell v. Illinois, 83 U.S. 130 (1872): The U.S. Supreme Court rules that a state has the right to exclude a married woman (Myra Colby Bradwell) from practicing law </li></ul><ul><li>1875 Minor v Happersett, 88 U.S. 162 (1875): The U.S. Supreme Court declares that despite the privileges and immunities clause, a state can prohibit a woman from voting. </li></ul><ul><li>1890 The first state (Wyoming) grants women the right to vote in all elections. </li></ul>
  • 7. Racial
  • 8. Suffrage
  • 9. Influential Women
  • 10. Margaret Chase Smith first woman to run for President
  • 11. Susan B. Anthony helped get women the right to vote
  • 12. Lydia Darragh acted as a spy for the Americans during the Revolutionary War, carrying vital intelligence to George Washington
  • 13. Ida Wells-Barnett black journalist and activist, campaigned for women's suffrage
  • 14. Abigail Adams wife of John Adams, who famously advised her husband to 'remember the ladies' when he was helping to write the Declaration of Independence
  • 15. Rosa Parks Dared to sit in white only part of the bus, starting integration reform
  • 16. Works Cited <ul><li>Skylar, Kathryn K., and Thomas Dublin. &quot;Women and Social Movements in the United States.&quot; The Journal for MultiMedia History . Binghamton University, State University of New York, 1999. Web. 20 Oct. 2009. </li></ul>

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