The art of story telling
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

The art of story telling

on

  • 305 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
305
Views on SlideShare
305
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
12
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

The art of story telling The art of story telling Document Transcript

  • Personal Branding Ref: 0027 The Art of Story Telling!Characteristics of a good story:  A single theme, clearly defined  A well developed plot  Style: vivid word pictures, pleasing sounds and rhythm  Characterisation  Faithful to source  Dramatic appeal  Appropriateness to listenersAdapting to our audiences:The audience has a very important role in storytelling - for their minds are the canvas onwhich the teller paints his tale. Oral storytelling involves much interaction between teller andhearer. Research indicates that audiences have lost some of the skills to follow a narratedstory and see things in their minds. Storytelling has become more difficult. Attention spansare shorter and more demanding, more sophisticated, yet less able to independently imagineor visualize. People seem to need more visual stimulation.  Take the story as close to them as you can.  Keep it brief and simple- especially for younger children - pare down to the heart of the story.  Stimulate their senses so they feel, smell, touch and listen and see vivid pictures.  Describe the characters and settings, and help them sympathise with the characters feelings.  Aim your story at the younger ones when telling to a audience of mixed ages!  Preparation: Once you settle on a story, you will want to spend plenty of time with it. It will take a considerable period of time and a number of tellings before a new story becomes your own.  Read the story several times, first for pleasure, then with concentration.  Analyse its appeal, the word pictures you want your listeners to see, and the mood you wish to create.  Research its background and cultural meanings.  Live with your story until the characters and setting become as real to you as people and places you know.  Visualise it! Imagine sounds, tastes, scents, colours. Only when you see the story vividly yourself can you make your audience see it! Page 1 of 3 For further information on this handout and the consulting and coaching programs available please contact: Image Group International Asia Pacific Head Office T: (+61 3) 9820 4449 W: www.imagegroup.com.au E: info@imagegroup.com.au ©2010
  • Delivery elements: Sincerity and whole heartedness (Be earnest!), Enthusiasm (This does not mean artificial or noisy excitement), Animation (in your gestures, voice, facial expressions)Stories are more interesting when there is animation and variety in the voice of the teller.Particular Oral Storytelling Skills:A Storyteller’s skills include: emphasis, repetition, transition, pause and proportion. Dialog should make use of different voices for different characters and using the Storytelling "V" - where you will shift your facing (or posture) as the dialog switches from character to character. Use your voice to create the atmosphere or tension as the story progresses. Use gestures and facial expressions add much to the visualization of the story. Be sure they are appropriate and natural. Practice them! Pacing involves both the volume and rate at which you speak, and the progression of the action in the story. Dialog slows a storys pace down, while narrating action speeds it up. Repetition and Exaggeration have always been basic elements of story telling.Experience will hone these skills, and when - and how - to use them most effectively.Bringing Stories Alive Express feelings  voice  face  body  hands Develop characters  little human details  have your characters speak - what did they say?  what did they do  habits  clothes Develop settings  paint a picture with words  sounds  smells  details that help the listener feel like they are there  tell with the fresh eyes of the outsider but the love of the insider Page 2 of 3 For further information on this handout and the consulting and coaching programs available please contact: Image Group International Asia Pacific Head Office T: (+61 3) 9820 4449 W: www.imagegroup.com.au E: info@imagegroup.com.au ©2010
  • Use props sparingly or create them with your words Variety of pace, volume, pitch Sound effects, repetition, rhymes Tell your own version of the story - put yourself in the story Keep any problem or tension in the story Involve audience - satisfy their curiosity Have fun - enjoy telling the story so your audience can enjoy listening Have a satisfying ending, a resolution, to your story“Study the past, live in the present, create your future” Jon-Michail Page 3 of 3 For further information on this handout and the consulting and coaching programs available please contact: Image Group International Asia Pacific Head Office T: (+61 3) 9820 4449 W: www.imagegroup.com.au E: info@imagegroup.com.au ©2010