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A is for attitude
A is for attitude
A is for attitude
A is for attitude
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A is for attitude

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  • 1. Personal Branding Ref: 0091A is for AttitudeBy Matt Windley | November 19, 2012A player once mused an AFL list is much like a PE class at school. You have your teacher’spets, leaders, jokers, nerds and those who sit at the back of the class and insist on muckingabout.And while the latter are tolerated as long as they fall back into line, those prone to detentionare not.Brendan Fevola and Daniel Connors are two players who have fallen out of the systembecause of behavioural issues.Thursday’s national draft is a critical filtering point where clubs can make sure “bad eggs”are kept out.As Essendon captain Jobe Watson told the Herald Sun, clubs cannot afford to waste time onplayers who aren’t of a certain disposition.“Any time you bring someone into your club, you want to know that they aren’t going to bepeople who hold you back,” Watson said. For further information on this handout and the consulting and coaching programs available please contact: Image Group International Asia Pacific Head Office T: (+61 3) 9824 0420 E: info@imagegroup.com.au www.imagegroup.com.au ©2012 Page 1 of 4
  • 2. Personal Branding Ref: 0091“You want to know that they are willing to fulfill and embrace what the ethos of the team is.The amount of energy that you might spend trying to manage people and get them to dowhat you want is really wasted, so clubs and even teammates now aren’t prepared to put upwith people who they have to constantly manage.”Never has being a “good bloke” in the eyes of a prospective coach, footy manager orrecruiter been so important.AFL talent manager Kevin Sheehan says the sport requires players and staff to worktogether productively for up to 50 hours a week.So attitude is the NO.1 thing that Michael Turner, regional manager of TAC Cup teamGeelong Falcons, tells his players to focus on.“And that’s a whole range of things,” Turner said.“It’s being prepared to work hard, to fit in with the team, follow instructions, be coachable.That is 100 percent the key area with AFL clubs now. Once they tick off on the (playingability) then that’s what they come home in on.”Recruiters are under enormous pressure to get the right people to their club. Severalrecruiting departments have access to a psychologist to help assess the characteristics ofpotential players.Parents, teachers and employers are all interviewed to get a better idea of the man behindthe footballer.Collingwood recruiting manager Derek Hine says no stone can be left unturned to find theright player for the club – on and off the field.“Because clubs are becoming more and more accountable, and as a consequence, it’s justcritically important that you are able to profile the athlete and be able to substantiate the pickthat you make,” Hine said.“It obviously matters if the pick is right or wrong, but it’s extremely important that you’re ableto get in front of the board and say ‘these are the reasons we actually picked this particularplayer.”“It’s obviously about looking at the athlete, his strengths and weaknesses in both a physicalsense and psychological sense. Then you look at the resources that you’ve got in yourorganisation to say: ‘OK, if I end up brining player X in, can I do so in confidence, knowingthat we’ve got the support structure in place to be able to address any particular weaknesseshe might have in his game or psyche?”“If you don’t think you can turn him around, then you may as well not bring the athlete in.” For further information on this handout and the consulting and coaching programs available please contact: Image Group International Asia Pacific Head Office T: (+61 3) 9824 0420 E: info@imagegroup.com.au www.imagegroup.com.au ©2012 Page 2 of 4
  • 3. Personal Branding Ref: 0091Former Hawthorn president Jeff Kennett confirms there is pressure from board level to bringquality people into the club.“It’s terribly important,” Kennett said.“Recruiters spend a great deal of time not only assessing the individual’s football abilities,but whether he is going to fit in well as a member of the team and within the culture of theclub. It wouldn’t have mattered how good a footballer they were, if they were not able to be apart of the team they will not be selected.”“All recruiters, and certainly at Hawthorn, spend a great deal of time with the individual, withhis family, before making recommendations that they should be drafted. So it’s not just onfootball ability.”Psychological assessments and interviews with clubs are critical when determining if aplayer is the right fit.Some try to meet players before they are “coached” to give good answers in interviews,while others wait until after the under-18 national championships.But if clubs want to get the full picture, Turner said they should look no further than theplayer’s TAC Cup of state league club “because they see them in a football atmosphere andknow how they react to the scenarios.”“Some AFL clubs are very good at doing that and some clubs are very poor,” Turner said.“We all give an honest appraisal.”He said players know what to expect when interviewed – Geelong’s Billie Smedts addressedFalcon players on the subject this year – but above all they are urged not to feel intimidated.“We only encourage them to be themselves,” Turner said. “That’s what the clubs want. Thryjust want an honest assessment.” For further information on this handout and the consulting and coaching programs available please contact: Image Group International Asia Pacific Head Office T: (+61 3) 9824 0420 E: info@imagegroup.com.au www.imagegroup.com.au ©2012 Page 3 of 4
  • 4. Personal Branding Ref: 0091 Geelong Falcons player Mason Wood who will be drafted into the AFL. Picture: Cormac Hanrahan.A POOR attitude may see potential draftees plummet in draft calculations, butplayers of exceptional character can rocket upwards.Take Geelong Falcon Mason Wood for example.Falcons regional manager Michael Turner believed that Wood, 19, (right) was nomore than a middle-of-the-road draft candidate at the start of the season.A stellar year on the field for the Falcons and Vic Country has undoubtedly helpedthe 189cm forward, but Turner said Woods off-field qualities had enhanced hischances of being selected early in Thursday nights draft."A kid like Mason Wood was probably going to get drafted at 30-40," Turner said."But if a kid tests really well and interviews really well, then hell go up in draftcalculations."So Mason Wood has probably gone from pick No.40 to around the 20s because heinterviews really well."After the draft combine, they sort of fine-tune it a bit, the AFL clubs, and things canchange pretty dramatically." For further information on this handout and the consulting and coaching programs available please contact: Image Group International Asia Pacific Head Office T: (+61 3) 9824 0420 E: info@imagegroup.com.au www.imagegroup.com.au ©2012 Page 4 of 4

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