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Perkins iv power point Perkins iv power point Presentation Transcript

  • Career and Technical Education in Minnesota Minnesota Perkins State Career and Technical Education Plan 2006 Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act Presentation to the Governor’s Workforce Development Council March 13, 2008
  • 2006 Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education ActPurpose of 2006 Perkins Act (Perkins IV)• Perkins IV Directs The Operation of Secondary, Postsecondary, and Adult Career and Technical Education Programs for the Period from July 1, 2007 to June 30, 2013• Perkins IV Requires Career And Technical Education (CTE) to Have a Renewed and Strengthened Focus on Collaborative Partnerships and the Development and Implementation of Programs Spanning Secondary And Postsecondary Education for Students Wishing to Combine Academic and Technical Preparation DRAFT
  • The 21st Century Career and Technical Education Framework: The National ContextThe Intent of Perkins IV jointly addresses the three prominentnational education and workforce development policy issuesfacing the United States in the DRAFTst century 21
  • Minnesota’s New Direction for CTE Scope of the Perkins Act• Minnesota will receive approximately $20 million in FY08: of which 85% goes to system colleges and high schools, with 15% remaining at OOC and the Minnesota Department of Education• Of the 85% allocated to system colleges and high schools: 90% will be allocated using a formula based on CTE participation and poverty measures 10% will be allocated using formula based on CTE participation and the geographical spread (in area) of a consortium• Of the 85% allocated to system colleges and high schools: 58% will go to system colleges and 42% to high schools DRAFT
  • Minnesota’s New Direction for CTE Scope of the Perkins Acto While this is a relatively small investment when compared to education spending as a whole (the state’s K-12 education budget is about $15 billion, and the higher education budget is around $3 billion)o The federal investment (Perkins) does much to provide a direction for state and local expenditures on CTEo This makes the information in the State Plan critical for career and technical education to be successful in Minnesota DRAFT
  • Minnesota’s New Direction for CTE State Plan Components• Planning, Coordination and Collaboration Prior to Plan Submission• Program Administration under a New Consortium Structure• Service to Special Populations• Accountability and Evaluation• Tech Prep Roll-in• Financial Provisions and Assurances• AppendicesDraft State Plan available at www.perkinsplan.project.mnscu.edu DRAFT
  • Minnesota’s new Direction for CTE What is New for Minnesota State CTE Plan Under Perkins IV• Established formal consortia of secondary and postsecondary partners to receive Perkins funds, jointly administering programs and support services for all secondary and post-secondary CTE students through a single joint local consortium plan. DRAFT
  • Minnesota’s New Direction for CTE Program Administration under a New Consortium StructureMinnesota, then, isforwarding a structuralchange under PerkinsIV that has established26 local consortia ofsecondary schooldistricts and two-yearSystem colleges. DRAFT
  • Minnesota’s new Direction for CTE What is New for Minnesota State CTE Plan Under Perkins IV• Each local consortium submits a local plan on May 8, 2008 to design, develop and implement programs of study/career pathways than span at least two years of high school and the first two years of post-secondary education to meet a new requirement under Perkins IV. DRAFT
  • Minnesota’s New Direction for CTELocal Consortium Application Plan DRAFT
  • Minnesota’s New Direction for CTE Programs of StudyThis chartdescribesMinnesota’sCareer Fields,CareerClusters andCareerPathways DRAFT
  • Minnesota’s New Direction for CTE Accountability and Evaluation Secondary Post-Secondary• Academic Attainment – Reading/ • Technical Skill Attainment Language Arts• Academic Attainment – Mathematics • Certificate Diploma, AAS, or• Technical Skill Attainment AS Completion• Secondary School Completion • Student Retention or Transfer• Student Graduation Rates • Placement into Employment• Secondary Placement into Higher • Nontraditional (Gender-Based) Ed, Military, or Employment Participation• Nontraditional Gender-Based) • Nontraditional (Gender-Based) Participation Completion• Nontraditional (Gender-Based) Completion DRAFT
  • Minnesota’s new Direction for CTE What is New for Minnesota State CTE Plan Under Perkins IV• The accountability provisions have more indicators, a greater degree of precision, and higher reporting requirements than under Perkins III. Under Perkins IV the accountability provisions include requiring: – The development of separate technical skill attainment measures as part of the overall accountability requirements. – Measuring of secondary CTE performance using the No Child Left Behind accountability measures. – Post-Secondary CTE success measure has been expanded beyond just graduation to include retention and transfer – The negotiation between the each local consortia and the state on all accountability indicator targets and performance. DRAFT
  • Minnesota’s new Direction for CTE What is New for Minnesota State CTE Plan Under Perkins IV• While ensuring the continued provision of programs and services to special populations, which has been the hallmark of the Perkins legislation, both at the state and local levels, consortia must address through their local plan: – The targeting of under-served and special populations, by advocating the use of the same strategies and measurement outcomes that apply to all other student populations, and, – Preparing non-traditional students for high-skill, high-wage, or high-demand employment in the region. DRAFT
  • Policy Implications Resulting from Implementing the Minnesota Five-Year State Career and Technical Education Plan• Redirect how Minnesota designs its CTE programs to support programs of study/career pathways implementation.• Establish a differentiated system of accountability for all CTE programs that distinguishes between technical skill proficiency and conventional graduation outcomes, significantly affecting how learner outcomes are assessed in high school and college CTE programs. DRAFT
  • Policy Implications Resulting from Implementing the Minnesota Five-Year State Career and Technical Education Plan• Strengthen secondary and postsecondary collaboration by requiring high schools and colleges to expend Perkins funds as a consortium of high schools and colleges who together will meet the intent of the Perkins Law through a single joint local plan.• Determine the process for allocating Perkins funds to high schools and colleges based on a rationale agreed to by the Chancellor of the Minnesota State Colleges and Universities and the Commissioner of the Minnesota Department of Education. DRAFT
  • Policy Implications Resulting from Implementing the Minnesota Five-Year State Career and Technical Education Plan• Explore coordinated data systems that allow for a wider array of accountability measures as students move directly from high school to college, in and out of education, and transition between education and employment.• Require that dual enrollment and articulation strategies be addressed as consortia are implementing programs of study/career pathways. DRAFT
  • Policy Implications Resulting from Implementing the Minnesota Five-Year State Career and Technical Education Plan• Support the goal of improving college readiness by identifying the high school academic and CTE courses that are preparatory to college programs as an integral part of implementing programs of study/career pathways.• Target Perkins funds to complement state and other federal programs that focus primarily on student support services to the underserved student, including those classified as special populations. DRAFT
  • Minnesota’s New Direction for CTE Looking Towards ImplementationWhen put into practice, the Minnesota Five-Year StateCTE Plan will make one thing clear, CTE in Minnesotawill reinforce what was already begun under the lastState Plan: The expectation of developing efficient systems, policies, processes andprocedures that increasingly intertwinelearning with work; and, where increasingachievement, greater opportunities,and varied options are not just choicesbut are objectively- determined outcomesthat will first and foremost benefit allstudents DRAFT