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SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013
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SFU Symposium / Keynote October 3rd, 2013

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  • JonathanLearning Intentions, Universal Designs for Learning, Backwards Design, Essential Questions, Enduring UnderstandingsWhatever way teachers choose to do it we are planning with the end mind.
  • JonathanLearning Intentions, Universal Designs for Learning, Backwards Design, Essential Questions, Enduring UnderstandingsWhatever way teachers choose to do it we are planning with the end mind.
  • JonathanLearning Intentions, Universal Designs for Learning, Backwards Design, Essential Questions, Enduring UnderstandingsWhatever way teachers choose to do it we are planning with the end mind.
  • BK – Junior Program at Grade 9 will assume certain skills etc that are continuing to be developed from grade 8.
  • BK – Junior Program at Grade 9 will assume certain skills etc that are continuing to be developed from grade 8.
  • Reading comprehension = Thinking
  • BothWhy assessment has become foundational to our teaching. “It’s the glue...”
  • Nancy
  • JonathanLearning Intentions, Universal Designs for Learning, Backwards Design, Essential Questions, Enduring UnderstandingsWhatever way teachers choose to do it we are planning with the end mind.
  • JonathanLearning Intentions, Universal Designs for Learning, Backwards Design, Essential Questions, Enduring UnderstandingsWhatever way teachers choose to do it we are planning with the end mind.
  • Practice with out penalty.Descriptive feedback related to agreed upon criteria / performance standards.Raises level of student attainment, and helps struggling students the most.
  • BothWhy assessment has become foundational to our teaching. “It’s the glue...”
  • Transcript

    • 1. Assessment and Grading Presented by: @jonathanvervaet SFU Symposium October 3rd, 2013
    • 2. How the worlds best schools come out on top. Individual Teachers •Aware of areas to grow in their practice •Gain understanding of best practice that is research based (meta-analysis) •Are motivated to improve •Have high expectations •Have a shared purpose
    • 3. “If students have not been told where they are going, it is unlikely that they will arrive.” – Shirley Clark
    • 4. Learning Intentions “I can become curious about something in the research I want to inquire further into.”
    • 5. Learning Intentions “I can outline the key principals of AFL and articulate what that looks like in practice.”
    • 6. Proficient Readers Research Successful readers – regardless of age – are active, purposeful, strategic, and metacognitive.
    • 7. Proficient Readers Research They construct meaning and learn from text by using cognitive strategies before, during, and after reading.
    • 8. “No matter what grade level you teach, no matter what content you teach, no matter what you teach with, your goal is to improve students’ comprehension and understanding.”
    • 9. “Student learning is enhanced when teachers at all grades, teaching all subjects, see themselves as teachers of literacy.”
    • 10. Instructional Design The 8 Cognitive Functions Good Readers Use
    • 11. 1. Setting a purpose / Reading with purpose in mind 2. Activating background knowledge to enhance understanding 3. Monitoring comprehension and awareness of how to repair comprehension problems 4. Determining what’s important
    • 12. 5. Making inferences and drawing conclusions 6. Visualizing mental images 7. Synthesizing and accurately summarizing information 8. Making connections
    • 13. “Assessment is the beginning and the end of my teaching. It defines my culture, my relationships, my learning community, my values, and my beliefs about teaching and learning.” - Matt Rosati
    • 14. Our Traditional System • Students are penalized if the don’t learn fast enough... Even though we know learning is an individual / developmental process. • What you do at the beginning of the course will always count against you... Despite the fact the student might now understand what they did wrong and how to prevent it in the future. • Grades include all student attributes... Even though we know grades should reflect the
    • 15. Inside the Black Box: Raising Standards Through Classroom Assessment
    • 16. When carried out effectively, informal classroom assessment with constructive feedback will raise levels of attainment. We know from research that effective assessment for learning can Improve student achievement substantially, and helps low achievers the most. Source: Black and William, Inside the Black Box 1998
    • 17. The effect sizes, that is the student gains in learning triggered by formative assessment, were among the largest ever reported for educational interventions. Source: Black and William, Inside the Black Box 1998
    • 18. Assessment for Learning 1. Learning Intentions 2. Success Criteria 3. Descriptive Feedback 4. Questioning 5. Peer / Self Assessment 6. Ownership
    • 19. Formative Ongoing Ungraded and Descriptive (uses words) Provides feedback to students and teacher Examples: -Oral questioning -Draft work -Reflections -Portfolio reviews -Peer / self assessments Summative Occurs at the end of a learning progression Graded to determine achievement level Evaluative Examples: -Inquiry projects -Presentations -Grade conferences -Portfolio reviews -Tests and quizzes
    • 20. Assessment for Learning 1. Learning Intentions 2. Success Criteria 3. Descriptive Feedback 4. Questioning 5. Peer / Self Assessment 6. Ownership
    • 21. Learning Intentions: What are we learning? Vs. Learning Activities: What are we doing?
    • 22. Learning Intentions  I can statements…  try and use child friendly language  separate from the activity instructions  make it visible  discuss with students why they are learning it
    • 23. Most students can hit the target if they can see it clearly and if it stays still. -Rick Stiggins
    • 24. Assessment for Learning 1. Learning Intentions 2. Success Criteria 3. Descriptive Feedback 4. Questioning 5. Peer / Self Assessment 6. Ownership
    • 25. Determine Acceptable Evidence
    • 26. Performance Tasks
    • 27. What does good look like? What does good look
    • 28. Success Criteria and the Use of Performance Standards
    • 29. Beginning Developed Accomplished Exemplary
    • 30. Reading Performance Standard Grade 2
    • 31. Thinking Rubric: Grade 9 Assignment: Name: Aspect Approaching Expectations Meeting Expectations Fully Meeting Expectations Exceeding Expectations Meaning Purpose Ideas and information; use of details Purpose is unclear; unfocused. Details, examples and quotations are missing or are not clearly linked to topic. Purpose is clear; may lose focus. Accurate details, examples and quotations; may not clearly link to the purpose. Mainly summary and may rely on general knowledge or emotion. Purpose is clear; focus is kept throughout. Accurate details, examples and quotations clearly linked to topic with conclusions or opinions attempted. Purpose and focus are clear throughout the entire assignment. Details, examples and quotations are fully explained with logical conclusions or opinions. Connections / Conclusions Connections Conclusions Connections between ideas are missing or very weak. No conclusions attempted or arrived at. Connections between ideas are attempted, but weak / simplistic. Little or no attempt at conclusions about the topic. Makes clear connections between ideas beyond the obvious. Has attempted to come to conclusions about the topic. Can relate the topic to a broader idea or other situations. Makes meaningful and deep connections throughout. Has come to clear and concise conclusions about the topic Comments / Suggestions:
    • 32. Summative Assessment Rubric: Athenian Democracy Is justice / freedom key for a society to be civilized? Approaching Expectations Meeting Expectations Fully Meeting Expectations Exceeding Expectations Snapshot Does not accomplish the basic task; may be flawed or incomplete. Ideas may be misinterpreted or overly simplistic. Accomplishes the purpose at a basic level with some gaps. Ideas are minimal and lack support. Accomplishes the purpose showing some complexity and maturity. Ideas are clear and well- developed . Exceeds the requirements of the task, showing complexity and maturity. Ideas are thoroughly developed, specific and economical. Meaning -Focus -Understand -Development - Specific details/support · Lacks focus and purpose · Minimal understanding of topic · Inadequate development · Some focus around a specific topic; purpose may be unclear · Basic understanding with minimal analysis · Development and support are evident but simplistic · Clearly focused around a specific purpose, audience · Understanding and analysis are generally evident · Tightly focused around a specific topic, purpose, audience · Interpretation and analysis demonstrate control and complexity Support -Detailed and specific information to support argument · Limited recall of factual content (lacks details/support) · May not be clearly linked to the topic · Minimal recall of support/details · References need further explanation. · Ideas are clearly developed and explained with appropriate support. · Ideas are thoroughly developed, strongly supported, well explained. I can describe the development of Athenian democracy and compare it to democracy in the present day. I can describe how Athenian democracy is a reflection of Athenian values. Comments:
    • 33. Summative Assessment Rubric: The Russian Revolution Approaching Expectations Meeting Expectations Fully Meeting Expectations Exceeding Expectations Snapshot Does not accomplish the basic task; may be flawed or incomplete. Ideas may be misinterpreted or overly simplistic. Accomplishes the purpose at a basic level with some gaps. Ideas are minimal and lack support. Accomplishes the purpose showing some complexity and maturity. Ideas are clear and well- developed. Exceeds the requirements of the task, showing complexity and maturity. Ideas are thoroughly developed, specific and economical. Comprehension -Identify main ideas - Define key terms or phrases Struggles to identify some main ideas; skips over difficult parts; doesn’t define key terms or phrases. Identifies some main ideas, may skip over some parts; attempts to define some key terms or phrases. Clearly and accurately identifies most of the main ideas; defines most key terms or phrases. Accurately identifies the main ideas; defines all key terms and phrases. Makes logical connections to other key events in the Russian Revolution. Makes few or no connections to other key events in the Russian Revolution. Makes some connections to other key events in the Russian Revolution. Makes logical connections to other key events in the Russian Revolution. Makes insightful and original connections to other key events in the Russian Revolution. Comments:
    • 34. Quick Scale: Reading Literature (Grades 10-12) Comments: Aspect Approaching Expectations (I range) Minimally Meeting Expectations (C- to C range) Fully Meeting Expectations (C+ to B+ range) Exceeding Expectations (A range) SNAPSHOT You offer an illogical and/or underdeveloped explanation and interpretation of texts. You offer a limited or surface-level explanation and interpretation of texts. You offer a logical explanation and interpretation of texts. You offer an analytic, thorough explanation and interpretation of texts. EXPLAIN àshow your work Even though I am thinking, I have difficulty and/or don’t understand how to explain or give examples about my process. I can attempt to explain my thinking, but have trouble clarifying my process. I may use examples, but they may be limited. I can explain my thinking process and use specific examples. I can explain my thinking process in detail, including the small steps or subtleties in my process. COMPREHEND àwho, what, when, where and how (W4 H): context Even though I can identify the W 4 H, I may misread, confuse and/or omit some key elements. My examples may be limited or flawed. I can identify the W 4 H and attempt to explain a basic understanding of their relationship. I can use some examples. I can identify and explain the relationships between the W 4 H. I can use explicit examples. I can identify and explain the relationships and subtleties between and amongst the W 4 H. I can effectively use explicit and/or implicit examples. CONNECT àtext to self, text to text, text to world Even though I attempt to make connections, they may be flawed, irrelevant, and/or incomplete. My examples may be limited, flawed and/or unjustifiable. I can establish and may be able to explain basic connections between the text and myself, other texts and/or the world. I can use some examples. I can establish and explain clear connections between the text and myself, other texts and/or the world. I can use explicit examples. I can establish and synthesize insightful connections between the text and myself, other texts and/or the world. I can effectively use explicit and/or implicit examples. INTERPRET àthe “why?”, drawing conclusions: inferences BK + TE = I Even though I attempt to use my background knowledge and/or evidence from the text, my interpretations may be general, unsupported and/or irrelevant. I can use my background knowledge and/or evidence from the text to make simple and/or obvious interpretations. I can use my background knowledge and/or evidence from the text to make clear, logical interpretations. I can effectively use my background knowledge and/or evidence from the text to make thoughtful, insightful interpretations.
    • 35. If students don’t understand the words used in the rubric, it might as well be written in a foreign language.
    • 36. Assessment for Learning 1. Learning Intentions 2. Success Criteria 3. Descriptive Feedback 4. Questioning 5. Peer / Self Assessment 6. Ownership
    • 37. Formative Assessment = Descriptive Feedback Informs the student Informs the teacher Informs Learning
    • 38. Descriptive Feedback Another way of thinking about feed back is… What’s working? How do I know? What’s not? Why not? What’s next? What is the fix?
    • 39. Self and Peer Assessment Student self-reflection on the helpfulness of feedback
    • 40. Carol Dweck (2006) Fixed vs. Growth Mindset. Fixed – Believe they have to work with whatever intelligence they have because it can’t be increased. They resist novel challenges if they can’t succeed immediately. They’d rather not try than be perceived as dumb.
    • 41. Carol Dweck (2006) Fixed vs. Growth Mindset. Growth – Believe intelligence can be built through life. See working harder as a way to improve. They persist and try a wide variety of solutions when given novel tasks.
    • 42. Carol Dweck (2006)
    • 43. Csikzentmihalyi (1990) Flow Theory – The exhilarating moments when we feel in control, full of purpose, and in the zone.
    • 44. Csikzentmihalyi (1990) Skill Level Challenge Level
    • 45. Daniel Pink (2009) Autonomy –over task, time, team, and technique. Mastery – Becoming better at something that matters. Purpose
    • 46. Harlow (1949) Radical finding, there was a third drive. The performance of the task provided intrinsic reward. The monkeys solved the problem simply because they found it gratifying to solve the puzzle.
    • 47. 2 Harlow (1949) Rewarded the monkey with raisons. “Introduction of food in the present experiment served to disrupt performance, a phenomena not reported in the literature.” The monkeys made more errors and solved the puzzles less frequently.
    • 48. Deci (1969) – Carnegie Melon Soma Block Experiment
    • 49. Deci (1969) Day 1 Day 2 Day 3 Group A No reward Cash Reward No reward Group B No reward No reward No reward
    • 50. Deci (1969) – Carnegie Melon Soma Block Experiment “When money is used as an extrinsic reward for some activity, the subjects lose intrinsic interest for the activity.”
    • 51. Commissioned vs. Non- Commissioned Art
    • 52. Marks & Grades as Rewards and Punishments
    • 53. Rewards transform interesting tasks into drudgery.
    • 54. Offering an award signals that the task is undesirable.
    • 55. Focus on Short Term vs. Long Term Benefits
    • 56. When goals are imposed and incentivized… Focus is narrowed on achieving only that goal.
    • 57. and… Here’s the kicker…
    • 58. It leads to unethical behaviour in an attempt to reach the goal. aka..
    • 59. Cheating…
    • 60. When rewards do work… With routine and mechanical tasks.
    • 61. You can’t undermine intrinsic motivation in boring tasks.
    • 62. Curriculum Mapping Learning Intentions – PLOs Big ideas / Enduring Understandings Essential Questions Concepts – Things to know Skills / Strategies Formative Assessments / Instructional Activities Summative Assessment(s) Resources
    • 63. Curriculum Map Unit of Study Learning Intentions – PLOs Big Ideas / Enduring Understandings Essential ?s Concepts (What students need to know) Skills & Strategies Speaking and Listening: Reading and Viewing: Writing and Representing: Metacognition: Formative Assessments / Instructional Activities Summative Assessments Resources Adapted from Pulling Together: Integrating Inquiry, Assessment, and Instruction in Today's English Classroom by Leyton Schnellert, Mehjabeen Datoo, Krista Ediger, Joanne Panas
    • 64. The Benefits of Formative Assessment Constantly weighing the pig won’t make it fatter...
    • 65. The Latin root word for assessment is "assidere" which means to sit beside.
    • 66. Assessment is done with, and not to, students to help them grow in their learning.
    • 67. "We must constantly remind ourselves that the ultimate purpose of evaluation is to have students become self evaluating. If students graduate from our schools still dependent upon others to tell them when they are adequate, good, or excellent, then we’ve missed the whole point of what education is about.” - Costa and Kallick (1992)
    • 68. “Assessment is the beginning and the end of my teaching. It defines my culture, my relationships, my learning community, my values, and my beliefs about teaching and learning.” - Matt Rosati
    • 69. The Paradigm Shift • Learning vs. Teaching • Outcomes / Standards vs. Tasks • Quality vs. Quantity • If students learn vs. When students learn • Confidence vs. Anxiety • Practice vs. One Chance • Improvement vs. Coverage Tom Schimmer
    • 70. Reflection: How is seeing ourselves as learners important for us as teachers?
    • 71. “Teaching is a vital and purposeful pursuit. We need to be working toward something and we need to know what that something is. Then we can consider how to best get there... I believe we should publish our goals and argue for their importance.” - Jeffrey D. Wilhelm
    • 72. #1 Priority
    • 73. You must use the research to support your practice to avoid being a well intentioned “Enthusiastic Amateur.” - Fullan and Hargraeves “Professional Capital”
    • 74. Don’t come into the profession to replicate current practice. Strive for excellence.
    • 75. Teaching is not rocket science. It is, in fact, far more complex and demanding work than rocket science. - Richard Elmore (Professor of Education Leadership at Harvard Graduate School of Education)
    • 76. Contact Information Jonathan Vervaet Email: jonathanvervaet@gmail.com Twitter: @jonathanvervaet Blog: jonathanvervaet.wordpress.com

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