Assessment in It's Many Guises

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Assessment Presentation given to SFU PDP Secondary Module on March 31st, 2014

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  • JonathanLearning Intentions, Universal Designs for Learning, Backwards Design, Essential Questions, Enduring UnderstandingsWhatever way teachers choose to do it we are planning with the end mind.
  • JonathanLearning Intentions, Universal Designs for Learning, Backwards Design, Essential Questions, Enduring UnderstandingsWhatever way teachers choose to do it we are planning with the end mind.
  • JonathanLearning Intentions, Universal Designs for Learning, Backwards Design, Essential Questions, Enduring UnderstandingsWhatever way teachers choose to do it we are planning with the end mind.
  • JonathanLearning Intentions, Universal Designs for Learning, Backwards Design, Essential Questions, Enduring UnderstandingsWhatever way teachers choose to do it we are planning with the end mind.
  • BothWhy assessment has become foundational to our teaching. “It’s the glue...”
  • Practice with out penalty.Descriptive feedback related to agreed upon criteria / performance standards.Raises level of student attainment, and helps struggling students the most.
  • Assessment in It's Many Guises

    1. 1. “If students have not been told where they are going, it is unlikely that they will arrive.” – Shirley Clark
    2. 2. Learning Intentions “I can find evidence of current assessment research in my initial practice.”
    3. 3. Learning Intentions “I can identify ways to use assessment to inform my instructional decisions .”
    4. 4. Learning Intentions “I can become curious about something in the research I want to inquire further into.”
    5. 5. “Assessment is the beginning and the end of my teaching. It defines my culture, my relationships, my learning community, my values, and my beliefs about teaching and learning.” - Matt Rosati
    6. 6. Motivation 2.0 True or False: Rewarding an activity will get you more of it. Punishing an activity will get you less of it.
    7. 7. Harlow (1949) Radical finding, there was a third drive. The performance of the task provided intrinsic reward. The monkeys solved the problem simply because they found it gratifying to solve the puzzle.
    8. 8. 2 Harlow (1949) Rewarded the monkey with raisons. “Introduction of food in the present experiment served to disrupt performance, a phenomena not reported in the literature.” The monkeys made more errors and solved the puzzles less frequently.
    9. 9. Deci (1969) – Carnegie Melon Soma Block Experiment
    10. 10. Deci (1969) Day 1 Day 2 Day 3 Group A No reward Cash Reward No reward Group B No reward No reward No reward
    11. 11. Deci (1969) – Carnegie Melon Soma Block Experiment “When money is used as an extrinsic reward for some activity, the subjects lose intrinsic interest for the activity.” Rewards give you a short term boost, but the effect wears off and can reduce long term motivation.
    12. 12. Commissioned vs. Non- Commissioned Art
    13. 13. Rewards transform interesting tasks into drudgery.
    14. 14. Offering an award signals that the task is undesirable.
    15. 15. Focus on Short Term vs. Long Term Benefits
    16. 16. When goals are imposed and incentivized… Focus is narrowed on achieving only that goal.
    17. 17. and… Here’s the kicker…
    18. 18. It leads to unethical behaviour in an attempt to reach the goal. aka..
    19. 19. Cheating…
    20. 20. When rewards do work… With routine and mechanical tasks.
    21. 21. You can’t undermine intrinsic motivation in boring tasks.
    22. 22. Instructional Design The Science of Learning
    23. 23. Instructional Design 90% of what we know about the brain we have learned in approximately the last 2 years
    24. 24. Instructional Design The same will be true 10 years from now
    25. 25. Carol Dweck (2006) Fixed vs. Growth Mindset. Fixed – Believe they have to work with whatever intelligence they have because it can’t be increased. They resist novel challenges if they can’t succeed immediately. They’d rather not try than be perceived as dumb.
    26. 26. Carol Dweck (2006) Fixed vs. Growth Mindset. Growth – Believe intelligence can be built through life. See working harder as a way to improve. They persist and try a wide variety of solutions when given novel tasks.
    27. 27. Carol Dweck (2006)
    28. 28. Csikzentmihalyi (1990) Flow Theory – The exhilarating moments when we feel in control, full of purpose, and in the zone.
    29. 29. Csikzentmihalyi (1990) Skill Level Challenge Level
    30. 30. Daniel Pink (2009) Autonomy – People need autonomy over task (what they do), time (when they do it), team (who they do it with), and technique (how they do it).
    31. 31. Daniel Pink (2009) Mastery – Becoming better at something that matters.
    32. 32. Daniel Pink (2009) Purpose – Humans want to make a contribution and to be part of a cause greater and more enduring than themselves.
    33. 33. Inside the Black Box: Raising Standards Through Classroom Assessment
    34. 34. When carried out effectively, informal classroom assessment with constructive feedback will raise levels of attainment. We know from research that effective assessment for learning can Improve student achievement substantially, and helps low achievers the most. Source: Black and William, Inside the Black Box 1998
    35. 35. The effect sizes, that is the student gains in learning triggered by formative assessment, were among the largest ever reported for educational interventions. Source: Black and William, Inside the Black Box 1998
    36. 36. Formative Assessment: 5 Key Strategies… sometimes 6! Dylan Wiliam “Embedded Formative Assessment” (2011)
    37. 37. Formative Assessment: 1.Learning Intentions and Success Criteria 2.Activities Designed to Elicit Evidence of Learning 3.Feedback that Moves Learning Forward 4.Peer Assessment 5.Student Ownership of Learning
    38. 38. Formative Assessment: 1.Learning Intentions and Success Criteria 2.Activities Designed to Elicit Evidence of Learning 3.Feedback that Moves Learning Forward 4.Peer Assessment 5.Student Ownership of Learning
    39. 39. Formative Assessment: 1.Learning Intentions and Success Criteria 2.Activities Designed to Elicit Evidence of Learning 3.Feedback that Moves Learning Forward 4.Peer Assessment 5.Student Ownership of Learning
    40. 40. Formative Assessment: 1.Learning Intentions and Success Criteria 2.Activities Designed to Elicit Evidence of Learning 3.Feedback that Moves Learning Forward 4.Peer Assessment 5.Student Ownership of Learning
    41. 41. Formative Assessment: 1.Learning Intentions and Success Criteria 2.Activities Designed to Elicit Evidence of Learning 3.Feedback that Moves Learning Forward 4.Peer Assessment 5.Student Ownership of Learning
    42. 42. Summative Assessme
    43. 43. Preparing for the ‘TEST’
    44. 44. Summative Assessment Activities - Students demonstrate knowledge / skills on which they have had opportunity to practice - Are based on known criteria - Focus primarily on individual student performance - Usually broader – integrate important skills and knowledge - Inform report cards Ken O’Connor, How to Grade for Learning
    45. 45. Triangulation of Data Damien Cooper, Talk About Assessment
    46. 46. Performance Task, Oral Conference, Written Test Data
    47. 47. Authentic Tasks = What Big People Do Grant Wiggins
    48. 48. The Benefits of Formative Assessment Constantly weighing the pig won’t make it fatter...
    49. 49. The Latin root word for assessment is "assidere" which means to sit beside.
    50. 50. "We must constantly remind ourselves that the ultimate purpose of evaluation is to have students become self evaluating. If students graduate from our schools still dependent upon others to tell them when they are adequate, good, or excellent, then we’ve missed the whole point of what education is about.” - Costa and Kallick (1992)
    51. 51. Contact Information Jonathan Vervaet Email: jonathanvervaet@gmail.com Twitter: @jonathanvervaet Blog: jonathanvervaet.wordpress.com

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