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What if the Internet's effects on society are like those of the Plague on medieval Europe? We might look at our 2010 marketing budgets a little differently...

What if the Internet's effects on society are like those of the Plague on medieval Europe? We might look at our 2010 marketing budgets a little differently...

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  • 1. The Digital Plague Jonathan Salem Baskin December 4, 2009
  • 2. Three Ideas The Marketplace Your Consumer An Opportunity
  • 3. 1. We don’t understand the nature of change. The Marketplace
  • 4. 2. We need a new view of our consumers. Your Consumer
  • 5. 3. The New Renaissance offers a new opportunity for marketers. An Opportunity
  • 6. The Black Death
  • 7. 40+ Years Later
  • 8. The Digital Plague
  • 9. 40+ Years Later
  • 10. Now
  • 11. The Marketplace Your Consumer An Opportunity
  • 12. 1. Content is no longer king. The Marketplace
  • 13. 1. Content is no longer king. • The Internet levels your communications • Your brand can’t be funnier or sexier than another • Your branding can’t own these attributes • Any nuanced differences are transitory, by definition The Marketplace
  • 14. 1. Content is no longer king. • The Internet levels your communications • Your brand can’t be funnier or sexier than another • Your branding can’t own these attributes • Any nuanced differences are transitory, by definition • It destroys all boundaries that differentiate audiences • Between your customers and employees • Between your employees and suppliers/vendors • Between suppliers/vendors and customers The Marketplace
  • 15. 1. Content is no longer king. • The Internet levels your communications • Your brand can’t be funnier or sexier than another • Your branding can’t own these attributes • Any nuanced differences are transitory, by definition • It destroys all boundaries that differentiate audiences • Between your customers and employees • Between your employees and suppliers/vendors • Between suppliers/vendors and customers • Your brand becomes narration, not promise or experience • The marketplace recognizes actions • It evidences its recognition through behaviors • Platforms/technology are artificial distinctions The Marketplace
  • 16. 2. You can’t declare truth. Your Consumer
  • 17. 2. You can’t declare truth. • Institutions (and brands) need to rediscover credibility • From your actions • From your critics • Keeping your branding and marketing from ruining it Your Consumer
  • 18. 2. You can’t declare truth. • Institutions (and brands) need to rediscover credibility • From your actions • From your critics • Keeping your branding and marketing from ruining it • All activities are local • Production • Consumption • Impact Your Consumer
  • 19. 2. You can’t declare truth. • Institutions (and brands) need to rediscover credibility • From your actions • From your critics • Keeping your branding and marketing from ruining it • All activities are local • Production • Consumption • Impact • Branding is a distributed experience • Tools related to context • All-inclusive record and framework • We should measure utility, not awareness or engagement Your Consumer
  • 20. 3. We need to change what, not how. An Opportunity
  • 21. 3. We need to change what, not how. • You need a business strategy, not a digital strategy • Stop buying technology, SEO, or “social” solutions • Start understanding underlying consumer needs • Base your planning on proven norms, not exceptions An Opportunity
  • 22. 3. We need to change what, not how. • You need a business strategy, not a digital strategy • Stop buying technology, SEO, or “social” solutions • Start understanding underlying consumer needs • Base your planning on proven norms, not exceptions • Understand media consumption • Relevance matters; exposure and distraction don’t • No medium is outdated or rejected; only bad usage • Every experience is mediated An Opportunity
  • 23. 3. We need to change what, not how. • You need a business strategy, not a digital strategy • Stop buying technology, SEO, or “social” solutions • Start understanding underlying consumer needs • Base your planning on proven norms, not exceptions • Understand media consumption • Relevance matters; exposure and distraction don’t • No medium is outdated or rejected; only bad usage • Every experience is mediated • Stop denying reality, and change marketing • Operational facts trump creative fiction • Don’t protect your budget; let collaborators add to it • Marketing isn’t a function as much as an ongoing aspect of An Opportunity every business practice
  • 24. Monday
  • 25. Challenge the next declaration of how ‘up’ is the new ‘down’ with a question about what has stayed the same. The Digerati
  • 26. Stop measuring ROI for a moment, and identify marketing tactics that can be measured by everyone else in the enterprise. ROI
  • 27. Replace an expectation of what consumers are supposed to think with a statement of what you know they will likely do. Planning
  • 28. Label an action in another department branding, and come up with 3 reasons why/how it matters. Transformation
  • 29. Focus on the reality of change, not the symptoms. A New Renaissance
  • 30. JonathanSalemBaskin
  • 31. JonathanSalemBaskin m: +1 312 725 0261 e: jsb@baskinbrand.com t: @jonathansalem S: baskinjs b: dimbulb.typepad.com w: jonathansalembaskin.com
  • 32. The Digital Plague