Jonathan Hassell
Design for all vs. Design for me: the limits of Inclusive Design
Session 6
jonathan@hassellinclusion.com
...
About me
• >12 years experience in accessibility and inclusion
• lead author of British Accessibility Standard BS 8878
• f...
More details on design for all and design for me
in my forthcoming book
• the full guide on how to transform your organisa...
1Difference is normal
Difference in task
– which one of its parts do you want?
Difference in context
– wherever & however you want it
Difference in context
– with whoever you want
Difference in screen size
– and how close you are to it
Difference in user
– confidence, preferences, capabilities
2Universal or
Inclusive Design
Inclusive design is all around us…
© 2011 Centre for Business Innovation Ltd
- 12 -
Centre for Business Innovation
“Connected Communities, helping you Do mor...
So, yes, I‟m a fan…
But it does have its problems
BBC iPlayer
disability focus group (2009)
• Vision impaired / dyslexic
• “I like the black –...
“It’s busy. There is no list... It’s a bit
difficult. Once I’ve closed the boxes, it’s
much better for me. I can see all t...
“You can‟t do that…” “You must do this…”
Why have „design for all‟…
when you can have „design for me‟?
And, because we‟re designing software,
it can go more than skin deep…
3Personalised design
models
Adaptation
From catastrophic early lunacy…
We‟ve been doing this poorly for years…
Things are getting better (and brighter)…
Do it once… use it everywhere…
Alternatives
cf.
How about… IPTV as „simple version‟
cf.
or mobile version as „simple version‟
cf.
or mobile app as „simple version‟
cf.
Or you might get…
„someone else‟s version‟ as „simple version‟
4So, be more creative…
Include personalisation in your toolbox…
02 Inclusive design
It might just be your…
And turn “you can‟t”
into “let‟s see what we can do…”
With full backing of Accessibility Standards
• the full guide on how to transform your organisation
to achieve the consistent creation of web sites and
apps that are u...
Training &
support for
BS8878
Standards
Innovation
www.hassellinclusion.com
Strategy &
research
e: jonathan@hassellinclusion.com
t: @jonhassell
w: www.hassellinclusion.com
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Design for all vs. Design for me: the limits of Inclusive Design

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Over the last few years accessibility has been usefully rebranded as ‘universal or inclusive design’, to emphasise its obvious link with usability and UX. But ‘universal design’ (design for everyone) is an unattainable ideal, and ‘inclusive design’ (design for as many people as you reasonably can) falls down where people’s needs cannot all be supported by one design. In this UCD-13 presentation, Jonathan Hassell discusses why we are settling for ‘design for all’ when the personalisation capabilities of digital software mean we can ‘design for me’, which is really what everyone wants anyway.

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  • it can be:reductiveconstraininglowest common denominatora compromiseit can constrain creativity & innovation - new technologies and techniques
  • Websites all for the same audience that need this stuff – all members of Vision 20:20 group
  • Design for all vs. Design for me: the limits of Inclusive Design

    1. 1. Jonathan Hassell Design for all vs. Design for me: the limits of Inclusive Design Session 6 jonathan@hassellinclusion.com @jonhassell #a11y @ucduk #ucd2013
    2. 2. About me • >12 years experience in accessibility and inclusion • lead author of British Accessibility Standard BS 8878 • former Head of Usability & Accessibility, BBC Future Media • led work to embed accessibility across BBC web, mobile and IPTV production teams • won BIMA 2008 & Access-IT@Home awards for the accessibility features of BBC iPlayer • Product Manager of innovative, award-winning products: • now advisor to:
    3. 3. More details on design for all and design for me in my forthcoming book • the full guide on how to transform your organisation to achieve the consistent creation of web sites and apps that are usable and accessible to all your customers, at the most efficient cost • with practical case-studies from leading accessibility experts worldwide, including: • Jennison Asuncion (Canada), • Debra Ruh & Jeff Kline (USA), • Andrew Arch (Australia) • David Banes (Qatar) • Axel Leblois (UN) For information on the book’s publication, free access to video case-studies, and a chance of winning the book… click below
    4. 4. 1Difference is normal
    5. 5. Difference in task – which one of its parts do you want?
    6. 6. Difference in context – wherever & however you want it
    7. 7. Difference in context – with whoever you want
    8. 8. Difference in screen size – and how close you are to it
    9. 9. Difference in user – confidence, preferences, capabilities
    10. 10. 2Universal or Inclusive Design
    11. 11. Inclusive design is all around us…
    12. 12. © 2011 Centre for Business Innovation Ltd - 12 - Centre for Business Innovation “Connected Communities, helping you Do more with Less” Engineering Design Centre OXO Good Grips • Well-known pioneer of Inclusive Design in the USA • Sam Farber’s wife, a keen cook, suffered from arthritis “Why do ordinary kitchen tools hurt your hands?” • First 15 products launched in 1990 • Sales growth over 35% per year from 1991 to 2002 • The line has now grown to over 500 products • Over 100 design awards received And its wins are impressive…
    13. 13. So, yes, I‟m a fan…
    14. 14. But it does have its problems BBC iPlayer disability focus group (2009) • Vision impaired / dyslexic • “I like the black – it’s cool” • “I hate it – I find it really tiring” • Aging / learning difficulties • “it was just too overwhelming”
    15. 15. “It’s busy. There is no list... It’s a bit difficult. Once I’ve closed the boxes, it’s much better for me. I can see all the options. I don’t need to scroll.” BBC homepage user testing 2009 “That’s good – it gives everything. 95% appeals to me” And not only for disabled people…
    16. 16. “You can‟t do that…” “You must do this…”
    17. 17. Why have „design for all‟… when you can have „design for me‟?
    18. 18. And, because we‟re designing software, it can go more than skin deep…
    19. 19. 3Personalised design models
    20. 20. Adaptation
    21. 21. From catastrophic early lunacy…
    22. 22. We‟ve been doing this poorly for years…
    23. 23. Things are getting better (and brighter)…
    24. 24. Do it once… use it everywhere…
    25. 25. Alternatives
    26. 26. cf. How about… IPTV as „simple version‟
    27. 27. cf. or mobile version as „simple version‟
    28. 28. cf. or mobile app as „simple version‟
    29. 29. cf. Or you might get… „someone else‟s version‟ as „simple version‟
    30. 30. 4So, be more creative…
    31. 31. Include personalisation in your toolbox…
    32. 32. 02 Inclusive design It might just be your…
    33. 33. And turn “you can‟t” into “let‟s see what we can do…”
    34. 34. With full backing of Accessibility Standards
    35. 35. • the full guide on how to transform your organisation to achieve the consistent creation of web sites and apps that are usable and accessible to all your customers, at the most efficient cost • with practical case-studies from leading accessibility experts worldwide, including: • Jennison Asuncion (Canada), • Debra Ruh & Jeff Kline (USA), • Andrew Arch (Australia) • David Banes (Qatar) • Axel Leblois (UN) For information on the book’s publication, free access to video case-studies, and a chance of winning the book… send us your details via the form on the next slide Many more details, and help for your journey towards accessibility maturity, in my forthcoming book
    36. 36. Training & support for BS8878 Standards Innovation www.hassellinclusion.com Strategy & research
    37. 37. e: jonathan@hassellinclusion.com t: @jonhassell w: www.hassellinclusion.com

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