Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Cilip Seminar 6th October - Integrating With Open Source
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Introducing the official SlideShare app

Stunning, full-screen experience for iPhone and Android

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Cilip Seminar 6th October - Integrating With Open Source

456
views

Published on

Published in: Technology, Education

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
456
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
8
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Integrating with Open Source Nick Dimant – Managing Director, PTFS Europe Jonathan Field – Technical Director, PTFS Europe
  • 2.
    • Who we are
    • Current frustrations
    • Is open source the answer?
    • Open source support companies
    • Implementing an open source solution
    • Conclusion
    Integrating The Open Source Option
  • 3.
    • Encouraging you to see open source software as a valid, sustainable option
    Purpose of presentation
  • 4.
    • Nick Dimant
    • Managing Director, PTFS Europe
    • Jonathan Field
    • Technical Director, PTFS Europe
    Who we are
  • 5.
    • The leading provider of digital archiving solutions in North America
    • Formed in 1995 - desktop imaging, integrated library systems and custom search systems
    • First release of ArchivalWare digital archiving solution – 2000
    • June 2008 – Support of open source library management software
  • 6.
    • A company formed in 2007 to distribute and support open source library products and the software products of PTFS, Inc
    • Local presence
    • Local expertise
    • Local training
    • Local support
    • Focused on European context
    • Backed up by major US presence
    PTFS Europe
  • 7.
    • Representative of
    • open source support companies
    PTFS Europe
  • 8. Current state of the Library Management System market
    • Stagnant, mature market
    • A few main vendors
    • Domination of private equity companies
    • Confusion over product direction
      • Discontinuation of systems
  • 9.
    • Slow pace of development
    • Functionality lag
      • Lack of Web 2.0 capability
    • Obsolete technologies
    • Declining levels of customer service
    • Increasing costs
    Current LMS Frustrations
  • 10.
    • Is open source the answer?
  • 11. What is Open Source Software (OSS)?
    • A worldwide community develops and maintains it
    • You can download, instal and modify it yourself
    • There are companies whose business model is to help you implement and support it, e.g.:
      • Biblibre
      • Equinox
      • PTFS
      • Alpha G
    • Free from lock in with single supplier
    • Tend to use next generation technologies
    • The software is free
  • 12. Kittens are Free
  • 13. There is a cost of ownership
    • Staff time
    • Support costs
    • Infrastructure
  • 14. So, it’s not free, but ....
    • Lower implementation costs
    • Cheaper on-going costs
    • Freedom to move between vendor
    • Freedom to develop what you want
    • Freedom to collaborate and share
    • Freedom to move quickly
  • 15. Market share
    • OSS LMS is now largest single source of new name installations in North America – outstripping proprietary vendors
    • Good presence in Indian market
    • Good presence in France
    • Minimal presence in UK until recently
  • 16. Open Source LMS software
    • Koha for special, government, legal, college libraries?
    • Evergreen for university and public libraries?
  • 17. Where is OSS successful?
    • Where there are capable local support bases:
      • USA
      • Canada
      • India
      • France
      • Australia and NZ
      • Growing in the UK
  • 18. How an open source support company can help
    • Expertise with open source LMS software
    • Experience in library automation
    • Commercial organisation with proven track record
  • 19. Procurement
    • Procurement can be a major obstacle;
    • PTFS Europe can make contractual commitments
    • Tender response
    • Functionality
    • Timescales
    • Cost
    • Support contract
  • 20. Financial benefits
    • No software license costs
    • Major savings on annual maintenance
    • Significantly lower hosting costs
    • Lower daily rate for professional services
      • Implementation
      • Training
      • Custom work
      • Software development
  • 21.
    • Unanticipated Efforts
    • Lack of coordination
    • Inadequate technical support
    • Customisation needed, lack of technical skill
    • How to implement, train, support?
    Addressing Disadvantages of Open Source Software
  • 22.
    • There are companies whose business model is to help you implement and support open source software
    Addressing Disadvantages of Open Source Software
  • 23. What to look for from a commercial organisation offering assistance
  • 24.
    • Knowledge of library environment
    • Commitment to library sector
    • Support organisation already in place
    • Implementation package
    • Ongoing support
    • Hosting (SaaS)
    • Software development capability
    What to look for from a commercial organisation offering assistance
  • 25.
    • Installation and configuration of LMS
    • Data extraction from current LMS
    • Data conversion and loading into LMS
    • Training
    Implementation package
  • 26.
    • Ensure there is a solid, resilient support infrastructure in place
    Ongoing support
  • 27.
    • Server managed for you
    • You still manage and control your LMS
    • LMS upgraded for you
    • Annual fee
    Hosting
  • 28. Software development
    • When is a bug not a bug?
    • Refine the workflow
    • Develop functionality
    • Provide whole new capabilities
    • Integration and interoperability
    • FAST development and lead times
  • 29.
    • A survey November-December 2008
    • Carried out by Ian Haydock, Keele University
    The use of Open Source software by UK Higher  Education libraries
  • 30.
    • We are unaware of what software is available
    • We need software which is not currently available via Open Source
    • We don't have time or staffing to set up these applications
    • We don't have time or staffing to maintain these applications
    • Paid-for systems offer better support in a crisis
    • Our institution restricts use of Open Source software
    Why doesn't your Library make more use of Open Source software?
  • 31.
    • We are unaware of what software is available (9)
    • We need software which is not currently available via Open Source (4)
    • We don't have time or staffing to set up these applications (19)
    • We don't have time or staffing to maintain these applications (23)
    • Paid-for systems offer better support in a crisis (8)
    • Our institution restricts use of Open Source software (4)
    Why doesn't your Library make more use of Open Source software?
  • 32.
    • Opportunity:
    • Benefits of open source software and next generation technologies
    • High quality implementation and support services
    • Reduced cost
    • Increased autonomy
    • Opportunities to collaborate
    • Fast development
    • Low risk
    Conclusion
  • 33. You don’t have to do it yourself!
  • 34. Nick Dimant – Managing Director [email_address]
  • 35. Technical Integration Jonathan Field
  • 36. Anyone use Facebook?..
  • 37.
    • Do you use Facebook?
    • Do your children use Facebook?
    • Do your grandchildren use Facebook?!
    • Why does this matter to libraries?
      • 300 million people around the world are now actively using Facebook and almost half of them are using Facebook every day
      • If Facebook were a country, it would be the eighth most populated in the world, just ahead of Japan, Russia and Nigeria
      • Facebook hit 150,000,000 just about two months after reaching 120 million and about four months after reaching 100 million. The site hit 140 million in the middle of December 2008 and has 300 million at September 2009.
    Facebook
  • 38.
    • Facebook is a huge success story in Web 2.0
      • It has made it mainstream
    • How does your LMS compare with Facebook?
    • How many Web 2.0 features can you find in your current LMS or OPAC?
    Web 2.0
  • 39.
    • Characteristics of Web 2.0
      • Social networking
      • Folksonomies (Tagging)
      • Software application through a browser (no client software)
      • Interfaces and applications based on technologies such as Ajax
      • Content syndication
      • Plugins and extensions
      • Authoring (comments, suggestions etc.)
      • XML and RSS
      • Web APIs
    Open Source LMS’s are leading the way in bringing Web 2.0 to libraries
  • 40.
    • No access to source code
    • “ hooks” often not there
    • Lack of publicly available documentation for DB schema/API etc.
    • Lack of modern integration tools
    • Slow take-up of standards
    • Cost – You may have to pay your provider to develop what you need
    • Lack of interest in third party applications / projects
    Integration Barriers of traditional LMS systems
  • 41. Examples of how an Open Source LMS can be integrated with these technologies and bring Library 2.0 to your library Koha ILS ( www.koha.org ) Evergreen ILS ( www.open-ils.org )
  • 42. Tagging
  • 43. Hey! I got tagged (mediated by me)...
  • 44. Patrons tag items...
  • 45. We build up a “tag cloud” or folksonomy...
  • 46. Tagging from LibraryThing (Mashups) ... With tagging it’s hard to build meaningful data from small communities, so..
  • 47.  
  • 48. Software Application through a browser
  • 49. My whole application through the browser... No client software to load...
  • 50. Software Application through a mobile device
  • 51. Content Syndication
  • 52. Integration with Enriched Content Google Books, Amazon etc.
  • 53. Integration with Enriched Content Google Books, Amazon etc.
  • 54. Integration with Enriched Content Google Books, Amazon etc.
  • 55. Integration with Enriched Content Google Books
  • 56. Integration with Enriched Content Amazon Reviews
  • 57. Plugins and extensions
  • 58.  
  • 59. Integration with Enriched Content Amazon Descriptions
  • 60. Integration with Citations Zotero (http://www.zotero.org/)
  • 61. Integration with Citations Zotero (http://www.zotero.org/)
  • 62.  
  • 63.  
  • 64. Authoring
  • 65. Hey! I got commented on (mediated by me)...
  • 66.  
  • 67.  
  • 68. Staff mediated comments
  • 69.  
  • 70.  
  • 71. XML and RSS
  • 72. Integration with Output Formats
  • 73. Integration with Output Formats MARCXML
  • 74. Integration with OAI-PMH Open Archives Initiative (http://www.openarchives.org/)
  • 75. Integration with RSS
  • 76. All my news comes via my RSS Reader...
  • 77. Integration with RSS
  • 78. Integration with RSS
  • 79.  
  • 80. Integration with RSS – Reading Lists
  • 81. Integration with RSS
  • 82. Integration with xISBN (FRBR)
    • ThingISBN
    • xISBN
      • (WorldCat)
    • PINES OISBN
  • 83.  
  • 84.  
  • 85.  
  • 86. Web APIs
  • 87. Integration with Digital Archive
  • 88. Integration with Federated Searching - Commercial
  • 89. Integration with Federated Searching – Open Source (http://dbwiz.lib.sfu.ca/dbwiz/)
  • 90. Integration with Google Scholar
  • 91.
    • Authentication
      • LDAP
        • Well documented, open, proven, tools. LDAP Perl module
    • SIP2
      • Self Checkout machines
      • PC Reservation
    • z39.50
    • SQL
    • EDI
    Of course we can still do all the standard integration (the “old” stuff!)
  • 92. But that’s so last century!
  • 93.
    • Developers working in disparate locations
    • Projects can just “die”
    • Support issues
    • Not knowing that someone else in the world has the same requirement as you
    Disadvantages
  • 94.
    • Availability of source code
    • Forum for democratic action
    • Lots of opportunities for Mashups
    • Parallel development programmes (e.g. Koha currently has at least 2 Acquisitions modules)
    • Opportunities to leverage Web 2.0 trends
    • Fast development
    • Exciting!
    Advantages
  • 95.
    • Integration can make all the difference to the success or failure of an open source project
    • Corporate integration enables open source software to sit comfortably within the overall corporate context
    • Technical integration ensures the system inter-operates with other resources and maximises the potential offered by the technologies used
    Conclusion
  • 96. Integrating with Open Source Nick Dimant – Managing Director, PTFS Europe Jonathan Field – Technical Director, PTFS Europe