• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content

Loading…

Flash Player 9 (or above) is needed to view presentations.
We have detected that you do not have it on your computer. To install it, go here.

Like this presentation? Why not share!

The New Intermediaries & Future Of Advertising

on

  • 446 views

How disintermediation is creating new intermediarioes and changing advertising

How disintermediation is creating new intermediarioes and changing advertising

Statistics

Views

Total Views
446
Views on SlideShare
445
Embed Views
1

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
7
Comments
0

1 Embed 1

http://www.linkedin.com 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • Clearly advertising has ‘died’… it’s just not enough anymore. What we mean by “post-advertising” is that, today, the only messages people will see and hear are the ones they choose to see and hear.Anything that isn’t interesting and relevant will be ignored. Especially marketing. Nearly everyone in marketing understands this at some level. But for us, it’s the reason we came into existence – to create campaigns and content that people will actually want to engage and interact with.
  • “ marketers should see themselves as trying to manipulate culture; being social engineers, not brand managers;manipulating cultural forces, not brand impressions”Guy Murphy, global planning Director for JWTFrom channel loyalty to talent loyalty
  • http://www.warc.com/News/TopNews.asp?ID=27337&Origin=WARCNewsEmail Word of mouth proves powerful in UKLONDON: The average consumer in the UK talks about 70 brands each week, a greater number than their US counterparts, new figures show.Word of mouth consultancy the Keller Fay Group researched nearly 2,600 British adults, covering over 26,000 online and offline conversations.It reported that the typical participant directly discussed 70 brands each week, measured against the total of 65 delivered in the US.Female shoppers mentioned 74 products by name per seven days, eight more than males, according to the company.Some 64% of respondents spoke about food and dining brands at least daily, with media and entertainment scoring 63% and beverages on 57%.Technology posted 48%, the same rating as retail and apparel, and ahead of telecoms' 47%, financial services' 43%, healthcare's 41% and automotive's 36%.Household goods came in further back on 30%, while personal care registered 29% and children's products recorded 18%.British consumers aired their views regarding the travel sector much more regularly than Americans, a gap standing at 24 percentage points.This disparity reached 12 percentage points for retail and ten percentage points for financial services and technology.Overall, 90% of brand-based WOM in the UK occurs offline, especially face-to-face, declining to 3% via email, 2% through instant messaging or SMS, and 1% on social networks, chatrooms and blogs.Encouragingly, 62% of such interactions were defined as "mostly positive", compared with just 9% in the "mostly negative" category.In 83% of discussions concerning specific goods, one contributor, at minimum, had previously used the brand in question."Both credibility and WOM impact are far higher in these situations than when nobody has had personal brand experience," said Ed Keller, ceo of the Keller Fay Group."The British might be known for being masters of understatement, but when it comes to word of mouth they are anything but reserved."Advertising featured in 17% of relevant interactions, with online the "most referenced medium" on 15% and TV on 13%, reversing US positions.Tesco, the retailer, headed the list of companies mentioned by UK customers, electronics manufacturer Sony claimed second spot and telecoms provider BT took third.Asda, another supermarket chain, and Apple, maker of the iPhone and iPad, closed out the top five.Data sourced from Keller Fay Group; additional content by Warc staff, 07 October 2010 
  • A blog post that’s commented on. A game that’s passed from friend to friend. A tweet that sends people to a piece of useful content. A survey that allows people to be heard. A free app that helps people accomplish something. A film that sits on YouTube and tells part of your story. A helpful Facebook tool that carries your brand in its DNA. A piece on HuffPost carrying your CEO’s byline. An ebook that…
  • The dream of a “perfect market”first effect of Web 1.0 was to , wherever it could, remove intermediaries i.e last minute, money supermarket etc.Typically creating price comparison sites & the first globally crowd determined “perfect markets” i.eThere are many buyers and sellers so that no one individual can influence market price. Reference Adam Smith wealth of NationsAuthority to publish is vested in people you don’t know and the wisdom of crowdsIntermediaries being people you don’t know; Search Brands moving to Marx’s notion of the Commodity described in Das KapitalThere are many buyers and sellers so that no one individual can influence market priceProducers and consumers have perfect knowledge of events in the market and act upon it.The product is homogeneous so that customers are indifferent between the produce of alternative suppliersFirms and customers act individually to maximise their position.There are no barriers to the movement of goods or factors of production.
  • Closing the content loopNatural search vs paid for Search will flip in importance

The New Intermediaries & Future Of Advertising The New Intermediaries & Future Of Advertising Presentation Transcript

  • CREATING CUSTOMERS WHO CREATE CUSTOMERS
  • Today, the only messages people see and hear are the ones they choose to see and hear. The most influential messages are from friends and online strangers.1
    the world has entered the post-advertising age.
    1Nielsen Global Online Consumer Survey, 2009, “Global Advertising: Consumers Trust Real Friends and Virtual Strangers the Most” http://bit.ly/9rSpU0
  • A Traditional customer journey
    Interruptive mass media…
    Display Ad
    PR
    TV
    Collateral
    POS
    DM
    Outdoor
    Radio
    Conversion
    Consideration
    Phoner
    Promotions
    … 2%, 10% conversion?
  • A Non-Traditional customer journey
    Content and experiences create brand conversations
    NON- TRADITIONAL CUSTOMER JOURNEY
    Google alerts
    Digg
    Animated fantasy
    Multi-player game
    YouTube
    Brand web site
    Digg
    Delicious
    Community
    Magazine editorial
    Online news
    Cable coverage
    Flickr photos
    POS
    iAd
    Purchase
    Advocacy
     
     
     
     
     
    Magazine AD
    Custom publishing
    Blog Post
    book
    Mini
    Documentary
    Facebook Fan Page
    Delicious
    TV & Event programming
    Search
    Brand Web Site
    Twitter
    MobileVideo
    YouTube
    Online News
    Magazine Editorial
    Banner
    AD
    POS
    Purchase
    Community
    Flickr
    Photos
    MobileCoupon
    Newspaper
    AD
    … 98% engagement.
  • THE PRIMARY OBJECTIVE OF A BUSINESS ( & SO, ADVERTISING)
    19th Century: was to create markets
    20th Century: was to create a customer
    21st Century: is to create a customer
    who creates a customer
    • lumpen masses
    • the century of the self
    • tribal communities
  • But paid media stops working when you stop pouring money into it. So it’s lifetime is finite and its main function now is to jumpstart earned media.
    Paid media is not going to disappear.
  • From channel loyalty to talent loyalty
    Earned media is free, infinite and VIRAL.IT EMPOWERS your customers to create more customers (at no cost to you).
  • Disintermediationand the rise of NEW intermediaries
    8
    BRAND
    BRAND
    (EARNED)
    NEW
    Inter-
    mediaries
    (Paid )
    Inter-
    mediaries
    (Paid)
    Inter-
    mediaries
    customers
    customers
    Ad-Age
    Broadcasting
    Post-Ad Age
    Storytelling
  • Fu
    MAKE FANS FROM YOUR FANS
    Funnel flipping metaphor from Seth Godin
  • The future OF ADVERTISING
    Closethe content
    loop