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Literate environment analysis

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    Literate environment analysis Literate environment analysis Presentation Transcript

    • By: Jomayra I TorresWalden UniversityEDUC6706:The Beginning Reader, Pre-K-3
    • “The GOAL of literacy instruction isto ensure that all students achievetheir full literacy potential “(Tompkins, 2010)
    • NON COGNITIVE COGNITIVE ASSESSMENTS ASSESSMENTS Non Cognitive  Cognitive assessments Assessments focus on the provide teachers with student’s motivation to read, self- the ability to concept, attitudes about understand each reading and how they feel student’s growth and about themselves as challenges as a reader readers (Afflerbach, 2007) (Afflerbach, 2007) Examples: Motivation to Read Survey, Classroom  Examples: Standardized Observation, Conversatio tests, reading ns with students inventories
    • ELEMENTARY READING ATTITUDE SURVEY  The Purpose of the ERAS is to measure attitude toward recreational and academic reading.  The assessment contains simple questions with visuals to aid all students in answering the questions as honestly as possible.
    • Elementary Reading Attitude Survey AnalysisThe ERAS allowed me to gain insight into eachchild’s motivation for reading and attitudetowards reading. Using an inventory such as thisenables me to gear lessons and units to eachstudents individual interest and needs. TheERAS, coupled with other assessments, can alsobe used to gain insight into students cognitiveand noncognitive learning.
    • Linguistic (Word Orientation)Narrrative Informational Semiotic (Pictures, etc)
    • Selecting TextsDifficulty Considerations Readability (sentence length, number of syllables, concept density) Text length Text structure Size of print Visual supports
    • Learners Texts Instructional Practices Affective and cognitive aspects of Text structures, types, genres, and Developmentally appropriate literacy learning difficulty levels matched to research-based practices used literacy learners and literacy goals with appropriate texts to facilitate and objectives affective and cognitive aspects of literacy development in all learnersInteractive PerspectiveReading and writing Use a variety of informal and Determine texts of the appropriate Use instructional methods thataccurately, fluently, and with formal assessments to determine types and levels of difficulty to address the cognitive andcomprehension areas of strength and need in meet literacy goals and objectives affective needs of students and literacy development. for the demands of the particular text.Being strategic and students.metacognitive readers and Promote students’ independentwriters use of reading strategies and skills.Critical PerspectiveJudging, evaluating, and Find out about ideas, issues, and Select texts that provide Foster a critical stance by teachingthinking critically about text problems that matter to students. opportunities for students to judge, students how to judge, evaluate, evaluate, and think critically. and think critically about texts. Understand the learner as a unique individual.Response Perspective Find out about students’ interests Select texts that connect to Provide opportunities forReading, reacting, and and identities. students’ identities and/or students to read, react, andresponding to text in a variety interests and that have the formulate a personal response toof meaningful ways Understand what matters to potential to evoke an emotional or text. students and who they are as personal response. individuals.
    • Learners Texts Instructional Practices Affective and cognitive aspects Text structures, types, genres, Developmentally appropriate of literacy learning and difficulty levels matched research-based practices used to literacy learners and literacy with appropriate texts to goals and objectives facilitate affective and cognitive aspects of literacy development in all learnersInteractive PerspectiveReading and writing Use a variety of informal and Determine texts of the Use instructional methodsaccurately, fluently, and formal assessments to appropriate types and levels of that address the cognitive andwith comprehension determine areas of strength difficulty to meet literacy goals affective needs of students and need in literacy and objectives for and the demands of theBeing strategic and development. students. particular text.metacognitive readers andwriters Promote students’ independent use of reading strategies and skills.
    • Teacher: Jomayra Torres; Carina GomesDate: March 21, 2012Age/Grade Range; Developmental Level(s): 5-6/K; Pre-K-1st Grade LevelsAnticipated Lesson Duration: 90 Mins Lesson FoundationsPre-assessment (including cognitive and non-cognitive measures): KWL chartCurricular Focus, Theme, or Subject Area: Lang. Arts/Science; Penguins (Focus on Emperor Penguins)State/District Standards: 5.10.2.A.1. Natural Systems and Interactions: Associate organisms basic needs with how they meet thoseneeds within their surroundingsLearning Objectives: Students will be able to:*Explain the differences between penguins and birds*Discuss facts about Emperor Penguins*Identify Antarctica’s location on the map*Demonstrate what a father penguin does to take care of its eggAdaptations for ELLs, Students with Special Needs, and/or Struggling Readers: Teacher’s translate text; paired with a resourceteacher throughout group work; difficult words are introduced and repeated regularlyPerspective(s) addressed in this lesson (Interactive, Critical, and/or Response): Critical and ResponsiveTexts: The Emperor’s Egg by Martin Jenkins, 2001 , Chillin’ with Mumble: The Truth about Penguins by Price Stern Sloan,2006, UsborneChildren’s Picture Atlas by Ruth BrocklehurstOther Materials/Technology/Equipment/Resources: Emperor Penguin Posters, KWL on Chart Paper, small ballGrouping structures (one-on-one, small group, whole class): Whole Class, small group
    • Lesson Sequence Learning Activities Assessment OpportunitiesIntroduction/Anticipatory Set Assess students background 1. Re-introduce KWL chart procedures knowledge of penguins through 2. Fill in chart with what students know about discussion penguins and what they would like to learn about themSynthesis/Closure Students will be assessed during observations made during whole and 1. After K and W on the KWL Chart is filled, students small group discussions will be introduced to words that are new or challenging. We will then read The Emperor’s Egg and re-read Chillin’ with Mumble: The Truth about Penguins as a class. Students will choral read when presented with the new words so that they become familiar with the words. 2. After we have read the two books, we will browse the Usborne Children’s Picture Atlas . Children will be re-introduced to the parts of an Atlas and what they are used for. 3. Children will be asked to recall where the Emperor penguins live (Antartica). They will also be asked to describe the habitat in which the Penguins live and how they survive. Students should be able to recall the new words that were presented at the beginning of the lesson. 4. Utilizing the Emperor Penguin Posters that contains pictures of various Emperor Penguins, students will be placed in 3 groups with a teacher and one of the texts read. First students will be engage in grand conversations in their small groups, with the teacher as their recorder. They will discuss how they felt about reading books about penguins and their comments will lead the discussion. 5. At the conclusion of the grand conversation, each group will get 5 minutes with each book in order to fill in the penguin poster with important facts they learned from the texts with help from the teacher. I will be looking to see if students can identify, classify and comprehend the new words presented in the text. 6. Students will return to whole class instruction seating and utilizing the charts they made in their small groups, we will fill in the L on the KWL chart.
    • “Determinetexts of theappropriatetypes and levelsof difficulty tomeet literacygoals andobjectives forstudents. “
    •  Use a variety of informal and formal assessments to determine areas of strength and need in literacy developmentAnalysis:For this lesson, students were assessed throughobservations in whole group and small groupdiscussions, as well as through observations oftheir interactions with the texts. The Frameworkas well as the literacy matrix helped with thefacilitation of the lesson because it helpedpinpoint areas of weakness as well as the areasthat are most influential in creating a literateenvironment.
    • Critical PerspectiveJudging, evaluating, and Find out about ideas, issues, Select texts that provide Foster a critical stance bythinking critically about and problems that matter to opportunities for students to teaching students how totext students. judge, evaluate, and think judge, evaluate, and think critically. critically about texts. Understand the learner as a unique individual.Response Perspective Find out about students’ Select texts that connect to Provide opportunities forReading, reacting, and interests and identities. students’ identities and/or students to read, react, andresponding to text in a interests and that have the formulate a personalvariety of meaningful ways Understand what matters to potential to evoke an response to text. students and who they are as emotional or personal individuals. response. The Critical Perspective involves our students assessing a text as they are reading (Laureate Education, 2010). The response perspective allows students to experience the text through making connections.
    • Building/Applying Knowledge and Skills As students are working, teachers will circulate the groups and ask students questions on what they are1. Review what are non-fiction/informative texts and what are their purposes.2. Students will be informed that they will be working in small groups to skim through the finding. various non-fiction texts, if necessary in order to create a list on chart paper for the What I Learned section of the class KWL chart. Students are encouraged to talk about the information while they skim/read, look for interesting information in pictures, maps and Students will be assessed during observations made other visual aids, and change books when they feel they have enough information for their chart. during whole and small group discussions3. In their journals, students are encouraged to keep a list of questions they have either to the author or about penguins in general.4. After about 20 minutes, we will return to whole class instruction and we will write down on chart paper next to the KWL chart some of the questions students have.Synthesis/Closure Observe for reading fluency and comprehension1. Students will be divided into new groups, where they will re-read the books in detail Observe for students ability to summarize information looking for answers to their questions.2. In their groups, students will create a Question and Answer book. Each member of the book is required to make a page for their groups book, utilizing visuals or words. Assess quality of workExtension/Enrichment/Transfer of Generalization of Knowledge:As a class we will complete the What I learned section of the KWL to complete the unit and its activities Analysis: A literate environment consist of being critical and being able to be responsive to texts. In this lesson, students are given the opportunity to do both. Using the resources, I was able to develop a lesson that allows even the lower level students to break out of their shells and experience texts in a variety of ways. To establish a literate environment, teachers must promote the development of all learners . This lesson adds to my literary toolkit, as well as promotes motivation to read and write.