What Museums Learn by Making Games - Serious Play Conference 2013

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My presentation at Serious Play Conference 2013 in Redmond, WA. August 19, 2013

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  • Shedd in CHicago
  • With Tate Trumps, visitors to the Tate Modern museum in London can experience the artworks displayed in the galleries from a different perspective, becoming directly involved and invested in them. The app “transforms the Tate Modern’s permanent collection into a game,” explain the designers, that is available in Battle, Mood, or Collector modes. In the first, players imagine scenarios where artworks would attack each other; the Mood mode guides players in contemplating which artworks elicit the most intense emotions; and the Collector mode allows players to assemble their own virtual galleries. Once players have chosen a roster of artworks in any of these modes, they can meet other participants for a competitive card game based on their choices. In this way, Tate Trumps infuses the museum experience with interactive, social elements.
  • - Insecurity - We are insecure about how fun we are. We think games will make us fun- Attendance – younger, new audiences. We think it will bring in new physical visitors and an increase in attendance, online + off innovation - We think it will make us look innovative and current Social - We think games will encourage social engagement around our collection and our brand Learning - Games are good teachers
  • - Insecurity - We are insecure about how fun we are. We think games will make us fun- Attendance – younger, new audiences. We think it will bring in new physical visitors and an increase in attendance, online + off innovation - We think it will make us look innovative and current Social - We think games will encourage social engagement around our collection and our brand Learning - Games are good teachers
  • - Insecurity - We are insecure about how fun we are. We think games will make us fun- Attendance – younger, new audiences. We think it will bring in new physical visitors and an increase in attendance, online + off innovation - We think it will make us look innovative and current Social - We think games will encourage social engagement around our collection and our brand Learning - Games are good teachers
  • - Insecurity - We are insecure about how fun we are. We think games will make us fun- Attendance – younger, new audiences. We think it will bring in new physical visitors and an increase in attendance, online + off innovation - We think it will make us look innovative and current Social - We think games will encourage social engagement around our collection and our brand Learning - Games are good teachers
  • - Insecurity - We are insecure about how fun we are. We think games will make us fun- Attendance – younger, new audiences. We think it will bring in new physical visitors and an increase in attendance, online + off innovation - We think it will make us look innovative and current Social - We think games will encourage social engagement around our collection and our brand Learning - Games are good teachers – forwards mission
  • Primarily about broadening our brand
  • Primarily about broadening our brand
  • Systems = game mechanicsFun + Engagement = learning by doingFailure = redefining what this means – building resiliency to experiment
  • Systems = game mechanicsFun + Engagement = learning by doingFailure = redefining what this means – building resiliency to experiment
  • Systems = game mechanicsFun + Engagement = learning by doingFailure = redefining what this means – building resiliency to experiment
  • Game mechanics are a system – Games build skills in levels – building blocks, learning one small skill at a time
  • Game mechanics as system designBuild skills in levels – building blocksMuseums (Art museums) aren’t very good at simpleAttempts at simplifying get labeled “dumb-ing down”Building games requires a team of experts Even simple games can be very complex
  • Making these games isn’t about making “chocolate covered brocoli” – Danny BirchallThey brought neuroscientists together with game designers and had them all start with identifying basic rules governing brain development.
  • – it has to work – technically, design, game play, messaging, all part of it. Sometimes solution is gameplay, s.t. technical, s.t. design…. It’s a system, and all parts of the system are keyCross-discipline skills building
  • Audience – part of the system is the audience too – but we’ll go into that in more depth in a bit…
  • Sometimes being literal, and factual isn’t so fun. Sometimes fixing things that are wrong is fun and engaging.
  • Sometimes being literal, and factual isn’t so fun. Sometimes fixing things that are wrong is fun and engaging.
  • Games are all about iterative learning. Most games are engaging precisely because you fail…..but you can still see what you have to learn in order to win, so you try again.
  • We thought this was it – audio tours are random access, the idea of telling someone on vacation that they have to follow an exact pathway through the museum seemed wrong
  • Example LESSON 1 - They want professional dev help - Whyville
  • Sometimes being literal, and factual isn’t so fun. Sometimes fixing things that are wrong is fun and engaging.
  • Systems = game mechanicsFun + Engagement = learning by doingFailure = redefining what this means – building resiliency to experiment
  • Systems = game mechanicsFun + Engagement = learning by doingFailure = redefining what this means – building resiliency to experiment
  • What Museums Learn by Making Games - Serious Play Conference 2013

    1. 1. What Museums Learn by Building Games Susan Edwards J. Paul Getty Trust sedwards@getty.edu @jolifanta
    2. 2. Ten years of museums games
    3. 3. Ten years of museums games Build-a-Fish – Shedd Aquarium 2003 Image: Courtesy of eduweb
    4. 4. Ten years of museums games Art Sets on Whyville – J. Paul Getty Museum 2004
    5. 5. Ten years of museums games Knucklebones – J. Paul Getty Museum 2004
    6. 6. Ten years of museums games GettyGames – J. Paul Getty Museum 2006
    7. 7. Ten years of museums games Launchball – Science Museum, London 2007 Image: Businessweek.com
    8. 8. Ten years of museums games Minnesota 150 Challenge – Minnesota Historical Society 2008 Image: Minnesota Historical Society on Flickr
    9. 9. Ten years of museums games Spy in the City – International Spy Museum 2008 Images: International Spy Museum
    10. 10. Ten years of museums games WolfQuest – Minnesota Zoo 2008 Image: wolfquest.org
    11. 11. Ten years of museums games Tate Kids – Tate Gallery, London 2008 Image: Tate Kids
    12. 12. Ten years of museums games Ghosts of a Chance ARG – Smithsonian American Art Museum 2008 Image: Ghost sofa chance.com
    13. 13. Ten years of museums games Tate Trumps – Tate Gallery, London 2010 Image: Tate Trumps on iTiunes
    14. 14. Ten years of museums games Art Game Lab – San Francisco Museum of Modern Art 2012 Image: SFMOMA
    15. 15. Ten years of museums games Murder at the Met mobile– Metropolitan Museum 2012 Image: Metmuseum.org
    16. 16. Ten years of museums games Switch mobile– J. Paul Getty Museum 2012
    17. 17. Why Do Museums Want to Make Games? + =?
    18. 18. Relevance Attendance Innovation Social Interaction Learning Why Do Museums Want to Make Games?
    19. 19. Relevance Attendance Innovation Social Interaction Learning Why Do Museums Want to Make Games?
    20. 20. Relevance Attendance Innovation Social Interaction Learning Why Do Museums Want to Make Games?
    21. 21. Relevance Attendance Innovation Social Interaction Learning Why Do Museums Want to Make Games?
    22. 22. Relevance Attendance Innovation Social Interaction Learning Why Do Museums Want to Make Games?
    23. 23. Relevance Attendance Innovation Social Interaction Learning Why Do Museums Want to Make Games? Outward facing goals
    24. 24. Marketing PR Education Outward facing goals.
    25. 25. Let’s Look Inward. What do we learn about ourselves?
    26. 26. Let’s Look Inward. What do we learn about ourselves? Professional Development HR Leadership
    27. 27. Play as Practice Photo by arbyreed on Flickr
    28. 28. 1. A game is a SYSTEM 2. Games are FUN and ENGAGING 3. In a game you FAIL often in order to succeed Play as Practice Photo by arbyreed on Flickr
    29. 29. 1. Building SYSTEMS 1. Infusing FUN and ENGAGEMENT 2. Learning to FAIL in order to succeed Play as Practice Image: The Moffatt Girls blog
    30. 30. 1. A game is a system.
    31. 31. 1. A game is a system. Images: iMore.com
    32. 32. LESSON: Simplify! 1. A game is a system. Art Sets on Whyville– J. Paul Getty Museum
    33. 33. LESSON: Simplify! 1. A game is a system. Axon – Wellcome Collection Image: Wellcome Trust
    34. 34. LESSON: Collaboration 1. A game is a system. Pheon – Smithsonian American Art Museum Images: Courtesy of Smithsonian American Art Museum
    35. 35. LESSON: Collaboration 1. A game is a system. Image of staff talking to visitors . (removed)
    36. 36. 2. A game is a fun and engaging. Something about engagement
    37. 37. LESSON: Re-think the Museum 2. A game is a fun and engaging. Ghosts of a Chance ARG – Smithsonian American Art Museum Images: Georgina Goodlander, Slideshare, courtesy of Smithsonian American Art Museum
    38. 38. LESSON: Re-think the Museum 2. A game is a fun and engaging. Ghosts of a Chance ARG – Smithsonian American Art Museum Images: Georgina Goodlander, Slideshare, courtesy of Smithsonian American Art Museum
    39. 39. LESSON: Learn to fib a bit 2. A game is a fun and engaging. Switch mobile game – J. Paul Getty Museum Images: J. Paul Getty Museum
    40. 40. 3. Games require failure. http://www.mandible.net/ Image: Dungeons of Dredmore. review, firsthour.net
    41. 41. LESSON: Fail often 3. Games require failure.
    42. 42. LESSON: Fail often 3. Games require failure.
    43. 43. LESSON: Fail often Games require failure.
    44. 44. LESSON: Rapid prototype 3. Games require failure. Images: Polgara on Flickr
    45. 45. LESSON: Listen Games require failure. Image of staff talking to visitors . (removed)
    46. 46. LESSON: Listen Games require failure.
    47. 47. LESSON: Resilience 3. A games require failure. Early early version of switch with no narrative
    48. 48. 1. Building SYSTEMS 2. Infusing FUN and ENGAGEMENT 3. Learning to FAIL in order to succeed Play as Practice Image: The Moffatt Girls blog
    49. 49. Thank You Susan Edwards J. Paul Getty Trust sedwards@getty.edu @jolifanta

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